Did you know Duncan Edwards

Discussion in 'Manchester United Forum' started by MancunianAngels, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Feb 5, 2018
    #1

    MancunianAngels Full Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2013
    Messages:
    1,234
    Location:
    Manchester
    Not mine obviously but always worth a post.

    Did you know Duncan Edwards Dad, I mean really really know? It’s just you’ve kept so many cuttings from all those years ago. And were the babes the greatest, the greatest ever team? Or just enshrined here in this history, just a bygone boyhood dream.

    Now I know you idolised them Dad, you gave each one their own page, the pictures are well faded now, but I suppose that comes with age. Dad, did Tommy Taylor really head a ball against the bar, which Harry Gregg collected, it had rebounded back so far? And was Duncan Edwards really, the greatest of them all, with silken skills and feathery touch, thirteen stone and six foot tall?

    Now there’s a contradiction surely Dad, but I’m going to let it pass, but Billy Whelan must have played once, without first going to Mass. And was Harry Gregg a goalkeeper supreme? Were Eddie Coleman’s hazy runs like red blurs on swards of green?

    And Dad can you explain to me how it ever came to pass, that Roger Byrne, just five foot nine, covered every blade of glass? Or how David Pegg whose swerving runs, like a scorpion you said, always struck the ball with venom, yet left no one for dead? Or how it was that big Mark Jones could soar into the sky, yet still patrol his area, so that nobody got by?

    Then there’s the team of Sixty Eight, and Dad I’d like to know, how George Best was always missing, yet played five hundred games or so? And how was it Bobby Charlton, who played so many vital roles, could be both a great goalscorer and a scorer of great goals? Or how Denis Law had chipped a ball from forty yards or more, it came back off the crossbar, and yet Law was there to sc ore?

    What use was it that Pat Crerand could split defences with one pass, when the ball only ever landed on a sixpence on the grass? And was Stepney’s save at Wembley, the best you’ve ever seen, or was it just that it resulted in the fulfilment of a dream? So now to Matt Busby, or Sir Matt as he’s now known, from a mining town in Scotland, yet still one of our own?

    Then finally there’s the Munich clock, the disaster time still shown. why do people say that they never intended coming home? The boy looked up with pleading eyes, and his father gently said.

    There’s a lifetime of old memories in the scrapbook you’ve just read. And of course there is some fiction, most fact, some strange yet true, that’s what makes players into legends, now I’ve passed them on to you.

    Those pictures may be faded son, but I can see them all so clear, as if it were just yesterday, and I hold each memory dear. Now I’ve passed this scrapbook on to you, to treasure for all time, And you too will find your heroes and build to them a shrine, and you’ll add your bits of fiction, but don’t worry son that’s fine, to make legends of your heroes and then place them alongside mine.

    And you’ll understand in years to come, as you watch great United teams, why it is we call Old Trafford, The Theatre of Dreams.
  2. Feb 5, 2018
    #2

    Denis79 Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,332
    Such beautiful writing, full of respect and fitting to commemorate the 60th anniversary. They will never be forgotten.
  3. Feb 5, 2018
    #3

    Random Task Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    4,985
    Location:
    Chester, UK
    I'm pretty sure that piece was originally intended to be a poem and it really should be structured as such.

    I don't mean to be an ass, it really is a great poem, it's just a little incoherent in its current format.
  4. Feb 6, 2018
    #4

    Foxbatt Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    879
    How good was he? I know Sir Bobby always say he was the best he has seen. Was he really better than a developed Bobby Charlton?
  5. Feb 7, 2018
    #5

    Offsideagain New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    206
    Location:
    Cheshire
    As posted elsewhere, I was 5 when the crash occurred. You must remember that TV was not in every home, maybe one in ten in our street so it was newspapers and radio that gave the info. I did keep newspaper cuttings and cards you could get with comics. My Dad and an Uncle of mine that was a professional footballer in the late 30’s with Preston would tell me all about Duncan Edwards and co . I didn’t get to OT until 1st Feb 1964 when I did see the Best, Law and Charlton who all looked so big and fast to an 11 yr old.

    Never be forgotten.
  6. Feb 8, 2018
    #6

    Bestietom Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    Messages:
    1,076
    Location:
    Ireland
    I was 7 when the crash occurred and only went to my first game in Old Trafford the following year 1959. But all my family never stopped talking about Duncan Edwards and Coleman as well as others. I can recall my 2 brothers coming back after games and telling how well all these superstars played. They will never be forgotten.
  7. Feb 8, 2018
    #7

    RuudVomMistelroum New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Being from Blackpool, my Granddad remembered him coming down to Bloomfield Road and commanding the games he played in. He said he was the best player alongside Sir Stanley Matthews that he had ever seen
  8. Feb 8, 2018
    #8

    dave1956 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2016
    Messages:
    56
    He played in every position for utd., including goal keeper. That says a lot about his footballing qualities. He was 16 when he made his debut for the first team, a number of clubs tried to get him banned from playing for the youth team, saying that he was a first team player.
    He was 18 when he made his England debut, and in my humble opinion had he survived, it would have been Duncan who would have been lifting the world cup in 1966 and not Bobby Moore.
  9. Feb 8, 2018
    #9

    Eyepopper Lowering the tone since 2006

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    60,937
    Johnny Giles was on the radio earlier talking about Munich. He was 17 and a youth player at Utd at the time. He said Edwards was just phenomenal, had everything and would've been one of the all time greats.

    He also spoke glowingly about Liam Whelan, something I'd never realised, in the season before Munich Whelan scored 26 league goals from midfield, he was 21 :eek:

    Giles said that but for Munich, Whelan would've been Ireland's greatest ever player.
  10. Feb 8, 2018
    #10

    Gary_Walsh_Nou_Camp_Hell New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2015
    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Whalley Range
    I've no intention for this to sound disrespectful at all but just a question in general about the memorials of tragic events like Munich or Hillsborough etc.

    Will the anniversaries be widely marked forever, I mean for the rest of time? Or will these tragic events fade in the public consciousness once there is no body alive with living memory or even second hand accounts?
  11. Feb 8, 2018
    #11

    dave1956 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2016
    Messages:
    56
    Yes, Liam was a fine midfield player, scored a hat trick if I remember against Burnley at Turf Moor. Utd, won 3 1. I think we forget that the home international sides also suffered, not only because of those who died but those players who never played again, Jackie Blanchflower springs immediately to mind plus John Berry and Kerry Morgan who would have played for Wales.
  12. Feb 8, 2018
    #12

    Eyepopper Lowering the tone since 2006

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    60,937
    I'm pretty sure they'll be remembered and honoured forever (as they should be).

    Its been 60 years since Munich, not as if was yesterday, and its viewed as the catalyst for what Utd have gone on to achieve.

    Hillsborough will never be forgotten either because of the magnitude of the tragedy, and everything that followed in the pursuit of justice.

    If anything I think both remembered both events will become even bigger as time goes on.
  13. Feb 8, 2018
    #13

    dave1956 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2016
    Messages:
    56
    Sorry previous thread should have read Kenny Morgans, and although he did play again he never reached the levels he did prior to Munich and finally leaving Utd., in 1961.
    He was one of the last survivors to have been recovered from the wreckage, some 5 hours after the initial impact. However, I still maintain that it was a player that was lost to the international team.
  14. Feb 9, 2018
    #14

    SalfordRed1960 Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,402
    Location:
    Miami Beach, FL 33139
    There have been quite a few disasters over the years that will be remembered for some time. This link shows someone's view of worst disaster, but I think Hampden Park and Bradford should be on the list as well.

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/foot...-in-history/story-UWsncKO2iC7ebMaXvVHPfL.html
  15. Feb 9, 2018
    #15

    Red Diva Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,019
  16. Feb 9, 2018
    #16

    SalfordRed1960 Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,402
    Location:
    Miami Beach, FL 33139
    You are right, my bad.
  17. Feb 9, 2018
    #17

    Fitchett Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    601
    Location:
    Manchester
    I remember the late comedian Bernard Manning, who was a City fan, stating that the best player he had ever seen was a Red, Duncan Edwards.
  18. Feb 11, 2018
    #18

    Denis' cuff Full Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Messages:
    6,081
    Location:
    here
    Always remember, as a little kid, the time after the crash. Duncan Edwards was the name on everybody’s lips, even those who didn’t follow the game were aware of his impact. But he wasn’t the only star. My first real United hero was Denis Law. I was just fascinated by his lightening movement and aggressive, acrobatic play but more than anything, his heading... my old fella just agreed he was some player but said he couldn’t head a ball like Tommy Taylor. That just astounded me that anyone could possibly be better than Denis, so, allowing for differences of opinion, he was obviously some player. (Denis was EFOTY) His goals tally stands with the best, too. One player who possibly gets mentioned more than any other, apart from big Dunc, by those who saw them play was Roger Byrne. The team’s leader and England captain, when they actually had a decent team. Strong, skilled and reliable. The old fella (season ticket holder until 10 yrs ago - his fave team was actually the ‘48 side, probably because he was young then) always maintained he was our GOAT left back and by some distance. My brother was named after him. Anyway, that was just three of the 8 that died.

    United we’re heading for a third consecutive title with an average age of 22. That’s how good they were.
  19. Feb 11, 2018
    #19

    Regulus Arcturus Black Full Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    5,485
    Agreed @Random Task

    Did you know Duncan Edwards Dad, I mean really really know?
    It’s just you’ve kept so many cuttings from all those years ago.
    And were the babes the greatest, the greatest ever team?
    Or just enshrined here in this history, just a bygone boyhood dream.

    Now I know you idolised them Dad, you gave each one their own page,
    the pictures are well faded now, but I suppose that comes with age.
    Dad, did Tommy Taylor really head a ball against the bar,
    which Harry Gregg collected, it had rebounded back so far?
    And was Duncan Edwards really, the greatest of them all,
    with silken skills and feathery touch, thirteen stone and six foot tall?
    Now there’s a contradiction surely Dad, but I’m going to let it pass,
    but Billy Whelan must have played once, without first going to Mass.
    And was Harry Gregg a goalkeeper supreme?
    Were Eddie Coleman’s hazy runs like red blurs on swards of green?

    And Dad can you explain to me how it ever came to pass,
    that Roger Byrne, just five foot nine, covered every blade of glass?
    Or how David Pegg whose swerving runs, like a scorpion you said,
    always struck the ball with venom, yet left no one for dead?
    Or how it was that big Mark Jones could soar into the sky,
    yet still patrol his area, so that nobody got by?

    Then there’s the team of Sixty Eight, and Dad I’d like to know,
    how George Best was always missing, yet played five hundred games or so?
    And how was it Bobby Charlton, who played so many vital roles,
    could be both a great goalscorer and a scorer of great goals?
    Or how Denis Law had chipped a ball from forty yards or more,
    it came back off the crossbar, and yet Law was there to score?
    What use was it that Pat Crerand could split defences with one pass,
    when the ball only ever landed on a sixpence on the grass?
    And was Stepney’s save at Wembley, the best you’ve ever seen,
    or was it just that it resulted in the fulfilment of a dream?
    So now to Matt Busby, or Sir Matt as he’s now known,
    from a mining town in Scotland, yet still one of our own?

    Then finally there’s the Munich clock, the disaster time still shown.
    Why do people say that they never intended coming home?

    The boy looked up with pleading eyes, and his father gently said.
    There’s a lifetime of old memories in the scrapbook you’ve just read.
    And of course there is some fiction, most fact, some strange yet true,
    that’s what makes players into legends, now I’ve passed them on to you.
    Those pictures may be faded son, but I can see them all so clear,
    as if it were just yesterday, and I hold each memory dear.
    Now I’ve passed this scrapbook on to you, to treasure for all time,
    and you too will find your heroes and build to them a shrine,
    and you’ll add your bits of fiction, but don’t worry son that’s fine,
    to make legends of your heroes and then place them alongside mine.
    And you’ll understand in years to come, as you watch great United teams,
    why it is we call Old Trafford, The Theatre of Dreams.
  20. Feb 11, 2018
    #20

    Random Task Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    4,985
    Location:
    Chester, UK
    Yeah that's the one.

    Good work.