2021 German Federal Election - who will replace Merkel - 6 different government coalitions possible

OleBoiii

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So if I understand correctly, Germany will go from having a center-right coalition in charge of the country to a center-left coalition?

If so: well done, Germany! :)
 

hellhunter

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So if I understand correctly, Germany will go from having a center-right coalition in charge of the country to a center-left coalition?

If so: well done, Germany! :)
Both options are still very much realistic and possible, but center-left won the election. Since both need partners to form a government, the decision is still up in the air and will be for a few weeks.
 

stefan92

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So if I understand correctly, Germany will go from having a center-right coalition in charge of the country to a center-left coalition?

If so: well done, Germany! :)
I don't think so. Problem is that the SPD won the election with Scholz as chancellor candidate, who is a center-left politician and could very well lead a SPD/Green/FDP coalition, but most SPD party leaders currently are more far left and hate the FDP with a passion. They are constantly attacking the FDP, even today, and will try to get their borderline socialist positions into a coalition contract.

On the other hand the Union usually does not really care about actual political positions as long as they can have the chancellor office.

So effectively a Green/FDP coalition with a Union chancellor but very little conservative content seems to be the most likely outcome for me.
 

2ndTouch

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So effectively a Green/FDP coalition with a Union chancellor but very little conservative content seems to be the most likely outcome for me.
It would be political suicide for the Greens and, very likely for the FDP as well, to help Laschet and the CDU to retain power. Nobody here wants to see him as Chancellor, and yesterdays results reflect that quite clearly.
It's over for Laschet and the CDU, they just need a bit more time to let in sink in and come to grasp it.
 

RoyH1

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Looking at an election map of Germany and was a bit surprised to see how strong the AFD is in Saxony and Thuringia. I realize that a big part of the AFD being much stronger in the eastern part of the country, is due to the after effects of the shock of the switch to market economy in the 90's and the lack of opportunities compared to other parts of the country. But is that all there is to it? Is there something else in the history of those regions to explain the strong showing of the AFD? I'd like to read a German opinion. Some English language journos just regurgitate the same old same old
 

2ndTouch

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Looking at an election map of Germany and was a bit surprised to see how strong the AFD is in Saxony and Thuringia. I realize that a big part of the AFD being much stronger in the eastern part of the country, is due to the after effects of the shock of the switch to market economy in the 90's and the lack of opportunities compared to other parts of the country. But is that all there is to it? Is there something else in the history of those regions to explain the strong showing of the AFD? I'd like to read a German opinion. Some English language journos just regurgitate the same old same old
It took less than 18 months after reunification for the first refugee asylum to get torched by an angry mob of new "Bundesbürger". Long story short, post war, there was no such thing as reflecting over the Nazi Regime, and no will to show any signs of accountability for what happened in the former GDR. Nazis, those were people in the West, not in the good communist East.
So, Nazi ideas weren't really fought, and could fester. Add in the fact, that those folks used to live for more than 40 years behind a wall, with no exposure to foreign cultures, and a deeply felt inferiority complex towards West Germans and you get an idea why these fools (and all kinds of anti-Vaxxers, and other tin foil hats) can flourish there.
 

Abizzz

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Looking at an election map of Germany and was a bit surprised to see how strong the AFD is in Saxony and Thuringia. I realize that a big part of the AFD being much stronger in the eastern part of the country, is due to the after effects of the shock of the switch to market economy in the 90's and the lack of opportunities compared to other parts of the country. But is that all there is to it? Is there something else in the history of those regions to explain the strong showing of the AFD? I'd like to read a German opinion. Some English language journos just regurgitate the same old same old
I can only offer a west German opinion and that is that that's just who they are. The bolded might actually be fair because there isn't anything new (other than covid). The cities that are actually going places like Leipzig and Dresden didn't vote AfD as much, but the village and towns people are hopeless.
 

stefan92

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It would be political suicide for the Greens and, very likely for the FDP as well, to help Laschet and the CDU to retain power. Nobody here wants to see him as Chancellor, and yesterdays results reflect that quite clearly.
It's over for Laschet and the CDU, they just need a bit more time to let in sink in and come to grasp it.
Yes and no. I could well imagine that the CDU fires Laschet and someone else emerges, along the PR lines of "we understand that the people do not want Laschet, we are listening". Laschet is already losing control, as Ralph Brinkhaus wants to be re-elected as the parliamentary party leader for the Union, against Laschet whishes to only fulfill this role provisionary until it is clear if Laschet does become chancellor, or has to become the opposition leader (and that would be the parliamentary party leader of the Union, that is why this job is important).

FDP does make clear for years now that they need to see some of their projects realized and do not seem to care very much with whom they do it - the Union just seems more likely to allow that than the SPD.

The Greens have a bit of strategic thinking ahead: They in general could be able to overtake the SPD as the biggest leftist party, but they failed to do so this time. It will be close to impossible to overtake the SPD the next time when they now become the smaller partner in a coalition with the SPD. If the Union pays the prize to enable a lot of Green projects that could be a much stronger base for a future Green-dominated leftist coalition.

Both Greens and FDP want a fresh start for the country, they agree on that and might find a common understanding. If they do that, it just is the question which one of the two big parties bends over the most to allow them this. IF such a government works successfully, there is a chance for both Greens and FDP to become bigger at the cost of SPD and/or CDU, but the party who has a (successful) chancellor usually profits from it.
 

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Looking at an election map of Germany and was a bit surprised to see how strong the AFD is in Saxony and Thuringia. I realize that a big part of the AFD being much stronger in the eastern part of the country, is due to the after effects of the shock of the switch to market economy in the 90's and the lack of opportunities compared to other parts of the country. But is that all there is to it? Is there something else in the history of those regions to explain the strong showing of the AFD? I'd like to read a German opinion. Some English language journos just regurgitate the same old same old
It's a difficult question. I'd say there are various psychological mechanisms at work here. The other posters already named the lack of reflection over the Nazi regime but the Eastern people also have a deeply ingrained distrust of the government making them prone to conspiracy theorists. Add to that that they never really built up media literacy so that large parts of the population are able to tell apart fake news and serious journalism. And then there also seems to be this general feeling of being left behind. You often hear them say that not everything was bad in the DDR since the state they grew up in (and at times remember nostalgically) has nowadays become infamous and the epitome of a surveillance state. Moreover, East Germany has a very low proportion of people with immigration background and ironically xenophobia is strongest when there's no exposure to other cultures. All this and the worse perspectives leads to many young and educated people leaving their homes for the West, too. It's a shame, really.
 

RoyH1

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Thanks for your inputs @Zehner , @Abizzz , 2ndTouch Interesting to read how much different people can feel/act in a prosperous and democratic country.
 

2ndTouch

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Yes and no. I could well imagine that the CDU fires Laschet and someone else emerges, along the PR lines of "we understand that the people do not want Laschet, we are listening". Laschet is already losing control, as Ralph Brinkhaus wants to be re-elected as the parliamentary party leader for the Union, against Laschet whishes to only fulfill this role provisionary until it is clear if Laschet does become chancellor, or has to become the opposition leader (and that would be the parliamentary party leader of the Union, that is why this job is important).
You think the CDU could pull another Kanzlerkandidat out of the blue? This isn´'t how it works. We've had an election and the electorate has cast a clear vote.


The Greens have a bit of strategic thinking ahead: They in general could be able to overtake the SPD as the biggest leftist party, but they failed to do so this time. It will be close to impossible to overtake the SPD the next time when they now become the smaller partner in a coalition with the SPD. If the Union pays the prize to enable a lot of Green projects that could be a much stronger base for a future Green-dominated leftist coalition.
If the Greens would be that stupid, they'd be political history in no time. I would never ever vote them again, if they acted as henchman for that corruption-infested husk of a former Volkspartei, and I'm hardly the exception among Green voters here.
The CDU would offer and promise the world to anyone, knowing they can just break the coalition treaty anyway as soon as they have claimed the Kanzleramt.


Both Greens and FDP want a fresh start for the country, they agree on that and might find a common understanding. If they do that, it just is the question which one of the two big parties bends over the most to allow them this. IF such a government works successfully, there is a chance for both Greens and FDP to become bigger at the cost of SPD and/or CDU, but the party who has a (successful) chancellor usually profits from it.
There is no fresh start if it comes with the likes of Merz, Linnemann, Altmaier, et al.
 

do.ob

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The Greens have a bit of strategic thinking ahead: They in general could be able to overtake the SPD as the biggest leftist party, but they failed to do so this time. It will be close to impossible to overtake the SPD the next time when they now become the smaller partner in a coalition with the SPD. If the Union pays the prize to enable a lot of Green projects that could be a much stronger base for a future Green-dominated leftist coalition.
I'd argue against that. A lot (all?) of people to the left of the CDU were absolutely desperate to prevent Laschet from winning the election. If the Greens now serve as his king maker, taking up a coalition with their mortal enemies on most/all of their core issues, then that could potentially be suicidal for them as a party.
 
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stefan92

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You think the CDU could pull another Kanzlerkandidat out of the blue? This isn´'t how it works. We've had an election and the electorate has cast a clear vote.




If the Greens would be that stupid, they'd be political history in no time. I would never ever vote them again, if they acted as henchman for that corruption-infested husk of a former Volkspartei, and I'm hardly the exception among Green voters here.
The CDU would offer and promise the world to anyone, knowing they can just break the coalition treaty anyway as soon as they have claimed the Kanzleramt.




There is no fresh start if it comes with the likes of Merz, Linnemann, Altmaier, et al.
I'd argue against that. A lot (all?) of people to the left of the CDU were absolutely desperate to prevent Laschet from winning the election. If the Greens now serve as his king maker, taking up a coalition with their mortal enemies on most/all of their core issues, then that could potentially be suicidal for them as a party.
Sounds like the two of you voted for the Greens or some other leftist party?

I appreciate your point of view, but as an FDP voter I see it a bit different: All three candidates are a disaster. All for different reasons, but in the end I know someone will become chancellor who I despise. So I don't care about that much, but I do care about the actual political actions that will happen.

It is a much different situation for the voters of parties that try to get into the chancellor office themselves I guess.
 

do.ob

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Sounds like the two of you voted for the Greens or some other leftist party?

I appreciate your point of view, but as an FDP voter I see it a bit different: All three candidates are a disaster. All for different reasons, but in the end I know someone will become chancellor who I despise. So I don't care about that much, but I do care about the actual political actions that will happen.

It is a much different situation for the voters of parties that try to get into the chancellor office themselves I guess.
It's not about my personal feelings. It's just my perception of what motivated voters. A lot of them seemed to be absolutely livid at the thought of Laschet taking office and preventing that from happening was one of the main points for them.

And while for you as a an FDP voter all three major candidates may be just different shades of crap, I have a feeling that people who see themselves firmly on the left have more nuanced feelings on that matter.
 

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It's not about my personal feelings. It's just my perception of what motivated voters. A lot of them seemed to be absolutely livid at the thought of Laschet taking office and preventing that from happening was one of the main points for them.

And while for you as a an FDP voter all three major candidates may be just different shades of crap, I have a feeling that people who see themselves firmly on the left have more nuanced feelings on that matter.
Agree, it's hard to make a case for Laschet as chancellor given his horrendous campaign and low approval ratings. On the other hand, while I can see Scholz and his core team finding compromises with the FDP, the rest of the SPD (including the party heads) are further left and thus further away from the FDP on economic issues. It's hard to see compromises there that will please the SPD left and make FDP voters happy at the same time as they generally occupy polar opposite positions on many issues. The solution is clear: A Jamaica coalition with Scholz as chancellor. ;)
 

stefan92

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It's not about my personal feelings. It's just my perception of what motivated voters. A lot of them seemed to be absolutely livid at the thought of Laschet taking office and preventing that from happening was one of the main points for them.

And while for you as a an FDP voter all three major candidates may be just different shades of crap, I have a feeling that people who see themselves firmly on the left have more nuanced feelings on that matter.
That's true. I still hope that Habeck and Lindner can pull a different rabbit out of the CDU hat, so that Laschet does not become chancellor.

Sure that would be unheard of in German politics but on the other hand no candidate got his party to a convincing, dominant result. A candidate that is selected by all three possibly involved parties could speak for his whole coalition and therefore be a better choice than sticking to a failed candidate.

And yes I think there is a small possibility for this as Laschet seems to lose control over his party, and it should make it much easier for the Greens to accept such a coalition?
 

stefan92

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The solution is clear: A Jamaica coalition with Scholz as chancellor. ;)
:lol:

The left wing of the SPD would be furious and kick him out of the party in an instant. But to be honest I think this would be far from the worst possible solution.
 

2ndTouch

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That's true. I still hope that Habeck and Lindner can pull a different rabbit out of the CDU hat, so that Laschet does not become chancellor.

Sure that would be unheard of in German politics but on the other hand no candidate got his party to a convincing, dominant result. A candidate that is selected by all three possibly involved parties could speak for his whole coalition and therefore be a better choice than sticking to a failed candidate.

And yes I think there is a small possibility for this as Laschet seems to lose control over his party, and it should make it much easier for the Greens to accept such a coalition?
Like if Laschet was the biggest issue here. I'm grateful for that dork to cock it up so epically. No, it's about getting all these corporate stooges out of power. I'm talking the Altmaiers, Klöckners, Scheuers, Linnemanns, Amthors. The CDU isn't just morally corrupt, this is literal. If we want to get this country forward, we need to have these roadblocks removed.
And no, there is no feasible way for the CDU to pull a new Kanzlerkandidat out of their hat *after* the election, and sell that to the public.
 

Zehner

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That's true. I still hope that Habeck and Lindner can pull a different rabbit out of the CDU hat, so that Laschet does not become chancellor.

Sure that would be unheard of in German politics but on the other hand no candidate got his party to a convincing, dominant result. A candidate that is selected by all three possibly involved parties could speak for his whole coalition and therefore be a better choice than sticking to a failed candidate.

And yes I think there is a small possibility for this as Laschet seems to lose control over his party, and it should make it much easier for the Greens to accept such a coalition?
I mean, even assuming that they're willing to do that, who would that person be? It's not like the CDU has an abundance of charismatic politicians ready to take over. Laschet was a stopgap but still one of the best they had at their disposal. The Union is in shambles and has more or less lost any good will they still had among the younger population in the last few years. All those lobby and corruption affairs (Amthor, Klöckner, Laschet, Scheuer, von der Leyen, Schäuble, Spahn ...), the treatment of Fridays for Futures (Schäuble, Kramp-Karrenbauer), and so forth have taken their toll.

To put it lightly, the young generation is sick of the CDU/CSU. They want change. And the FDP and the Greens profited from that since both build their election campaigns upon that wish and were rewarded by being the most popular parties among the 18-30 year olds.

Like if Laschet was the biggest issue here. I'm grateful for that dork to cock it up so epically. No, it's about getting all these corporate stooges out of power. I'm talking the Altmaiers, Klöckners, Scheuers, Linnemanns, Amthors. The CDU isn't just morally corrupt, this is literal. If we want to get this country forward, we need to have these roadblocks removed.
And no, there is no feasible way for the CDU to pull a new Kanzlerkandidat out of their hat *after* the election, and sell that to the public.
That's capturing the current spirit quite well I believe.
 

1950

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In the end, the Union is still to the right of the center, but the Liberals are probably more to the right, and AfD is essentially as right-wing as Tea Party. Which makes the impression that the Union is center, despite them being center-right.

Something similar can be said for the left wing politics in Germany. SPD are center-left, Green Party a bit more to the left, and The Left being lunatics.
SPD are neo-liberals, Green Party are environmentalist neo-liberals and The Left are social democrats. Nothing left-wing about any of these.

By the way, the KPÖ is also a social democratic party masquerading as communists.
 

stefan92

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Like if Laschet was the biggest issue here. I'm grateful for that dork to cock it up so epically. No, it's about getting all these corporate stooges out of power. I'm talking the Altmaiers, Klöckners, Scheuers, Linnemanns, Amthors. The CDU isn't just morally corrupt, this is literal. If we want to get this country forward, we need to have these roadblocks removed.
And no, there is no feasible way for the CDU to pull a new Kanzlerkandidat out of their hat *after* the election, and sell that to the public.
However Laschet was likely the most unpopular CDU candidate ever, so selling a different choice to the public would be quite easy now. The CDU can rightfully aay they would have gotten more votes with any other candidate. You are right about those other problematic people, but it is not realistic to get rid of all of them (which is sad).
To put it lightly, the young generation is sick of the CDU/CSU. They want change. And the FDP and the Greens profited from that since both build their election campaigns upon that wish and were rewarded by being the most popular parties among the 18-30 year olds.
Government participation since 1998:
19 years SPD
16 years CDU
7 years Greens
4 years FDP

Yes we want change, but there are two parties who represent the status quo, and we can only get rid of one of them, and strategically forcing the weaker one to accept more strict terms allows more change.
 

Zehner

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However Laschet was likely the most unpopular CDU candidate ever, so selling a different choice to the public would be quite easy now. The CDU can rightfully aay they would have gotten more votes with any other candidate. You are right about those other problematic people, but it is not realistic to get rid of all of them (which is sad).
Government participation since 1998:
19 years SPD
16 years CDU
7 years Greens
4 years FDP

Yes we want change, but there are two parties who represent the status quo, and we can only get rid of one of them, and strategically forcing the weaker one to accept more strict terms allows more change.
The problem remains that there is nobody they could appoint, even if they considered such a very, very bold move that in itself has the potential to ruin them entirely. The only alternatives would probably be Söder or Merz and they'd be equally unpopular among the younger population. And whether or not the SPD participated more since 1998 (comes across as a rather random number to be honest), I'd estimate that the Union is much more unpopular than the SPD among the young right now.

Don't get me wrong, I think Jamaika is still possible but this won't go well with most of the young voters and will cause a lot of annoyance among those who brought the Greens and the FDP in this favourable position (and who are the basis of their future success). I mean, can you imagine the reaction by Fridays for Future if the Greens build a coalition with the Union of all parties? They already attacked them heavily because even their election program wasn't inline with the 1.5° goal, they'd be absolutely fuming. I'd say the Greens would have much more explaining to do for cooperating with the Union than the FDP would have to for cooperating with the SPD. In the end, the SPD also has won the election and experienced an upwards trajectory while the Union experienced the complete opposite of that.
 

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The problem remains that there is nobody they could appoint, even if they considered such a very, very bold move that in itself has the potential to ruin them entirely. The only alternatives would probably be Söder or Merz and they'd be equally unpopular among the younger population. And whether or not the SPD participated more since 1998 (comes across as a rather random number to be honest), I'd estimate that the Union is much more unpopular than the SPD among the young right now.

Don't get me wrong, I think Jamaika is still possible but this won't go well with most of the young voters and will cause a lot of annoyance among those who brought the Greens and the FDP in this favourable position (and who are the basis of their future success). I mean, can you imagine the reaction by Fridays for Future if the Greens build a coalition with the Union of all parties? They already attacked them heavily because even their election program wasn't inline with the 1.5° goal, they'd be absolutely fuming. I'd say the Greens would have much more explaining to do for cooperating with the Union than the FDP would have to for cooperating with the SPD. In the end, the SPD also has won the election and experienced an upwards trajectory while the Union experienced the complete opposite of that.
That's true. But the FDP will find it much harder to agree policies with the SPD than the Greens would with CDU/CSU as the SPD have convictions that are often polar opposite to those of the FDP, while CDU/CSU are more flexible on policies as long as they get to lead the government. Also, the Greens have long established a possibility to do a coalition with CDU/CSU, it is not a taboo anymore.

Nevertheless, I agree that the "Ampel" (traffic light) coalition is the most likely outcome and the most acceptable to the general public given that the SPD is the strongest party and Scholz by far the highest rated candidate. But if the SPD screw up and give FDP plausible reasons to reject a coalition and if CDU/CSU manage not to fall apart through infighting while providing a good offer to FDP/Greens, a Jamaica coalition could come back on the table. Certainly, the Greens and even more the FDP have an incentive to keep the option open to have more leverage in the negotiations with the SPD.
 
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stefan92

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The problem remains that there is nobody they could appoint, even if they considered such a very, very bold move that in itself has the potential to ruin them entirely. The only alternatives would probably be Söder or Merz and they'd be equally unpopular among the younger population. And whether or not the SPD participated more since 1998 (comes across as a rather random number to be honest), I'd estimate that the Union is much more unpopular than the SPD among the young right now.
You might be right about the unpopularity of the Union amongst young people. I choose 1998 as I guess this is the timeframe that the young generation actively experienced and lived in, like me who as a 29 year old has Schröders victory 1998 as the first political memory. Doesn't change the picture very much if you go one election back or forth. Söder and Merz are possibilities, but I guess they are also burned by losing the internal election inside the Union to become candidate. I could imagine someone like Daniel Günther as a fresh compromise candidate (who is prime minister in Schleswig-Holstein leading a Jamaica-Coalition).

Don't get me wrong, I think Jamaika is still possible but this won't go well with most of the young voters and will cause a lot of annoyance among those who brought the Greens and the FDP in this favourable position (and who are the basis of their future success). I mean, can you imagine the reaction by Fridays for Future if the Greens build a coalition with the Union of all parties? They already attacked them heavily because even their election program wasn't inline with the 1.5° goal, they'd be absolutely fuming. I'd say the Greens would have much more explaining to do for cooperating with the Union than the FDP would have to for cooperating with the SPD. In the end, the SPD also has won the election and experienced an upwards trajectory while the Union experienced the complete opposite of that.
There might be more explaining necessary, but if they can make sure that they can get more things done, the Greens should be fine I guess. FFF are a lost cause, they will be unhappy with any realistic result, so I guess it does not make sense to try to make them happy. They have valid points, but are so far away from the center of the society that they should not be a showstopper. And again I expect the Union to bend over much more to get into the government than the far-left part of the SPD.

But if the SPD screw up and give FDP plausible reasons to reject a coalition and if CDU/CSU manage not to fall apart through infighting while providing a good offer to FDP/Greens
That's exactly what I expect to happen, SPD will screw this up.
 

2ndTouch

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You are right about those other problematic people, but it is not realistic to get rid of all of them (which is sad).
It's pretty realistic to see them on the opposition bench very soon, nonetheless
 

stefan92

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It's pretty realistic to see them on the opposition bench very soon, nonetheless
Wirecard, CumEx, getting Germany convicted for torture - Scholz does not look much better. But I tend to agree that there are more of these people in the CDU than in the SPD, I give you that.
 

2ndTouch

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Wirecard, CumEx, getting Germany convicted for torture - Scholz does not look much better. But I tend to agree that there are more of these people in the CDU than in the SPD, I give you that.
Hey, I'm not a Scholzomat devotee, but it's like you've said. Knowing the CDU no longer at the wheels in crucial ministries like Agriculture or Traffic puts my mind at ease at least a little bit. I'm expecting good things out of a Ampel. Fiscal policies will require compromises from all sides, but I think other than that, there aren't any insurmountable obstacles.
 

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Looking at an election map of Germany and was a bit surprised to see how strong the AFD is in Saxony and Thuringia. I realize that a big part of the AFD being much stronger in the eastern part of the country, is due to the after effects of the shock of the switch to market economy in the 90's and the lack of opportunities compared to other parts of the country. But is that all there is to it? Is there something else in the history of those regions to explain the strong showing of the AFD? I'd like to read a German opinion. Some English language journos just regurgitate the same old same old
Higher share of dodgy characters in these areas. Seriously, even some politicians from CDU and FDP in that region are basically staunch conservatives that are very, very odd. Some of them are hidden racists.

Even the legal systems in these states -are somewhat blind on the right eye.

Do not forget, the neo-nazi terrorists from NSU also stemmed from that area.
 

VidaRed

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How long before the far right nazis win ? I give it another decade.
 

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So it's looking like SDP, Greens and FDP are making the first attempt to form a government. CDU/CSU - the parties of the old and the southern traditionalists are looking like they are done.
 

Rektsanwalt

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Jul 28, 2019
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Schalke 04
So, it seems like FDP, SPD and Grüne will form a proper government soon.

Key aspects are renewable energy, no new debt, reform of our basic social security net (Hartz 4), minimum wage of 12€ per hour (13,93$ at the moment). Obviously still very vague, but the current outlook doesn't seem to bad, especially considering there will be no speed limits on the german Autobahn and no wealth tax. It somehow actually seems like they picked important key aspects of their own strengths and formed a proper program for the next years.

I'm missing any talk about national and international security, though. That kind of bothers me and I already expected this to be the case. I would have liked national and international security and especially military reforms pushed out rather fast since the situation is really dire in that department.
 

Kasper

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Mar 10, 2013
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Hansa Rostock / Bradford City
So, it seems like FDP, SPD and Grüne will form a proper government soon.

Key aspects are renewable energy, no new debt, reform of our basic social security net (Hartz 4), minimum wage of 12€ per hour (13,93$ at the moment). Obviously still very vague, but the current outlook doesn't seem to bad, especially considering there will be no speed limits on the german Autobahn and no wealth tax. It somehow actually seems like they picked important key aspects of their own strengths and formed a proper program for the next years.

I'm missing any talk about national and international security, though. That kind of bothers me and I already expected this to be the case. I would have liked national and international security and especially military reforms pushed out rather fast since the situation is really dire in that department.
:lol:
Imagine having these big priorities in 2021: Not introducing a speed limit that would be beneficial to environment, CO2 emission, local residents and accident risks, something which every other European country is doing already - and not taxing the rich.

Overall I'm happy that they went ahead quickly and that Jamaica never really turned out to be an option. Even if I'm sceptical about the coalition, not having corrupt scum like Seehofer, Scheuer, Klöckner etc. in important ministeries sabotaging everything will make a big difference.
From what I've read and heard so far there are a couple of positive things (voting age to 16, weed legalization, children rights, cutting of subsidies for shitty sectors), a couple of things where we'll have to see how that pans out (solar+wind energy promotion, unemployement reform) and a couple of meh things especially the lack of tax increase which questions how certain things are to be financed.
 

hellhunter

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Aug 5, 2011
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Stuttgart, Germany
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Karlsruher SC
:lol:
Imagine having these big priorities in 2021: Not introducing a speed limit that would be beneficial to environment, CO2 emission, local residents and accident risks, something which every other European country is doing already - and not taxing the rich.
It's like saying you're a lawyer without saying you're a lawyer :lol: