Behind the Curtain | Eastern European draft | The winner: Skizzo

mazhar13

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I have been kind enough so far but I'll remind you all of that rule. I will use it, if necessary. Please, send your formations and tactics in advance

@mazhar13
Oh crap, I forgot about that. Give me a moment. I will send them over soon.
 

Šjor Bepo

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Gudelj is reliable, persistent, durable even when his circumstances are not on his side. His decision on field are simple and effective, he is confident just as much as his capabilities permit, he is very fair but anything bar soft - in short, he is everything that Yugoslav football is not.

Ivan Gudelj is today 22 years old.
Two years ago, he had hard time to settle in the team of Hajduk.
Today is the biggest Hajduk hope in time where several senior players had military service.
He was a captain of the national team by the age of 21 and he represented his nation in 33 games in which he scored 3 goals.
Is the only player who has excelled in the World Cup(French magazine L'Equipe put him on their list of ideal team of 1982 World Cup), only for two or three of his colleagues can be said to have met. Later that year he was named Yugoslav Footballer of the Year in 1982.

vs Northern Ireland, World Cup 1982

But Gudelj we demonstrated in the two years even more than that: he is the athlete who absolutely surpasses the framework of the Yugoslav sport.
Gudelj is an archetypal example of hardworking footballer but the power of his personality shatters the mold of the scheme in which that label could put him in.
Simply put, Gudelj is not East German machine player, what we need to seek in him is the elements of self-devotion, typical of British.
Ultimately, football is not a sport that suffers extremely simplified schematization.
Solid roots of Gudelj the footballer are all the more refined: superior physical fitness allows him to go from simple tasks too a playfulness that does not lose its effectiveness.
"He was the most complete player, was all over the field, he was deadly. There was no maneuvering, just went straight to the net. Just like Ronaldo(brazilian)." former coach Poklepovic
"Gudelj I called Ivanhoe, according to that knight," remembers Špaco(Poklepovic) played as defensive midfielder but impact wise was winning every third game, and in Hajduk, in the glorious power generation of 80, scored 35 goals, but only until the age of 26.
Ciro Blazevic(lead croatia to the WC bronze in 98) recalls that in 1986 wanted him at Dinamo.
"Id have the best midfield in the world - Gudelj, Prosinecki, Boban. Only Boksic used to remind me of him, when he went, he went - like Gudelj"



"The captain of Hajduk Ivan Gudelj crashed around 75 minute in the middle of the pitch. At first sight - out of the blue. Nobody around him. Hajduk bench responded quickly, dr. Branko Gršković ran into the ground and soon signaled coach Sergei Kresic is not necessary to make a substitution. Gudelj was carried of from the field. Muscle left leg did not survive. Still some time left to lie with a throw-line. And then he was gone ... His exit was followed by disapproval from the stands. Escorted by whistles. No one could foresee that this is the end of his playing career. The captain and the best player of White went forever. Ivan Gudelj never returned to the field as a professional footballer. "

Previous two paragraphs are an introduction to the book "Hajdučka priča" journalist Blaise Duplančića, a kind of biography of the Split club midfielder from the first half of the eighties. Supporters of the middle generation and will be happy to remember physically robust boy from Imotski region that easily broke through the opposing defense. He will remembered for media titles like "Gudelj and heart are enough" from that Hajduk generation of the eighties, perhaps the best in the history of the club, which has not won almost anything important. Together with Blaz Sliskovic and brothers Zlatko and Zoran Vujovic, Gudelj did foursome in the team which is the title of national champions escaped four times, while in European competitions Hajduk certainly regularly went to the second round. Of course, at the time in Split - spirited and ambitious - to enter the quarter-finals of the UEFA Cup was considered normal things, anything less was proclaimed a failure, but no one could have anticipated that two decades later and only appearance in Europe club 'be fantastic range. The story of the day 51-year-old Ivan Gudelj, however, is much more than a football resumes. In his prime, 26-year-old man down the hepatitis B virus, more severe form of jaundice, for which he had to interrupt his career.

Just then conferred the imminent move to Real Madrid, and was already turned down the offer of French Bordeaux with a salary of one million dollars per year, for that time a huge amount of monye. The disease ended Gudelj career, he turned to alternative methods of treatment, then became a very religious man, and his life was finally arranged through exceptional self-control and said, positive thinking. "There is no situation from which one can not get out of willpower, positive thinking and escape from negative emotions. I assure you, when all 50,000 spectators at Poljud at one point closed their eyes and all his energy wholeheartedly focused on healing only one man - the disease would disappear. Yes, believe me, in my life is the most positive approach, "said Gudelj. After a break football career he married and had two daughters, then successfully coached several clubs as well as national youth selections.
 

Šjor Bepo

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"Boksic drove us mad. Frankly, he was unstoppable."

Italian coach Giovanni Trapattoni was the man to pay that simple compliment to Croat and Lazio striker Alen Boksic and he was speaking just after his current club, Cagliari, had been humiliated 4-0 last Sunday by a Lazio side in which Boksic was quite simply stupendous.

Trapattoni is not just anybody rather he is the most successful post war coach in Italian soccer and a man who coached Juventus to six league titles between the mid 70s and mid 80s. As such, his opinion is perhaps worth consideration.

Indeed, those who ought to give it the most serious consideration are the Danes, Portuguese and Turks, scheduled to meet Boksic, Croatia et al in Group D of this summer's European Championships in England.

Croatia may not win the European Championship but they will certainly be the single biggest surprise element in the tournament.

The intriguing point about Boksic, however, is that, following a period of injury and a period when it seemed that Lazio's Bohemian coach, Zdenek Zeman, did not especially rate him, he has returned to his majestic best.

Boksic is a deceptive player. At first glance, he looks like the complete central striker. He has terrific pace, precise control, a powerful shot and is immensely strong in the air, while he stands six feet two inches tall and appears to have the physique to make himself respected in the penalty area.

In truth, Boksic is everything other than a central striker. He might look tall, but he is in fact more a winger than a goalscorer. He is the man who creates the chances, who gets to the byeline and sends in the cross for the centre forward. On Sunday against Cagliari, he did that with monotonous regularity, in the end sending in central striker Pierluigi Casiraghi for two spectacular goals.

Boksic is also a player who likes to take the ball deep and then run with it and keep on running with it. He has good initial pace but he seems to get faster the further he goes, making him an obvious crowd pleaser on his best days.

Boksic has shown himself able to ride the helter skelter of Italian soccer. His skill and self belief have survived intact through a difficult period this autumn.

The most regular criticism of Boksic this winter has been that he does not score often enough. Two league goals in 13 games would seem to prove that point. Yet the reality is that he is not a goalscorer. He serves other attacking purposes.

Boksic is one of a group of Croat players whose childhood was tough and whose footballing genesis has taken place against the backdrop of ethnic warfare. Like his Croatia team captain, Boban, he has regularly given of his time and his wallet to help fellow Croats, at home and abroad.

He himself had to leave his native town of Makarska on the Adriatic coast at the age of 12, while his life as footballing journeyman began at the age of 21 when he moved from Croatia's best known side, Hadjuk Split, to Olympic Marseilles. Three years ago, and for the modest sum of $10 million, he moved from Marseilles to Lazio.

Tactical:

Workrate:

Skill:


Those who have played alongside Boksic have no doubts about his worth. Portuguese and AC Milan striker, Paolo Futre, currently injured, once said that Boksic will one day be rated the best in the world and on a par with Dutchman Marco Van Basten.

“Alen Bokšić, he is my only regret!. If I had him fit and at full strength then I would be European and World champion. When he walks past I move out of the way. What he could do with the ball, God, what a player”! ‘ Blažević said.

"Alen is a wonderful player," said Venables. "I have worked with some world-class players in my time and he is right up there with the best of them."
 

mazhar13

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@harms @oneniltothearsenal @green_smiley

I'm sorry to say this, but I am unable to make it to our match today. I have become overloaded with work as I have a release this week, so I cannot spend time on other things anymore.

I know that I should have been able to get this done over the weekend, but I've been quite sick as well as dealing with tooth pain, so I've struggled to get down to doing the work.

Again, my apologies for wasting everyone's time. Just DQ me and let GS move on unless OneNil is willing to play in my place.

Once again, sorry for the inconvenience, and I'll try not to apply for drafts if I am unable to take the time off for it.
 

harms

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@harms @oneniltothearsenal @green_smiley

I'm sorry to say this, but I am unable to make it to our match today. I have become overloaded with work as I have a release this week, so I cannot spend time on other things anymore.

I know that I should have been able to get this done over the weekend, but I've been quite sick as well as dealing with tooth pain, so I've struggled to get down to doing the work.

Again, my apologies for wasting everyone's time. Just DQ me and let GS move on unless OneNil is willing to play in my place.

Once again, sorry for the inconvenience, and I'll try not to apply for drafts if I am unable to take the time off for it.
Sure, we'll wait for @oneniltothearsenal 's answer. If not we can draw a formation with a couple of words to see how the game goes?
 

Šjor Bepo

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Gifs rule, finished game and half + few videos in less time that id need to create match compilation video for one player.
 

Šjor Bepo

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František Plánička



Individual Accomplishments:

1934 FIFA World Best Goalkeeper
1934 World Cup All-Star Team
IFFHS Czechoslovakia Goalkeeper of The Century
9th IFFHS World Goalkeeper of The Century

Team Accomplishments:

World Cup Runner-up: 1934
Czechoslovak League Championship: 1925, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937
Mitropa Cup: 1932
Bohemia Cup: 1926, 1927, 1928, 1930, 1932, 1935

Profile

'The Cat of Prague' Plánička is one of the greatest and most honored players in history of Czechoslovakian football - with a peak that saw him lead Czechoslovakia to the final of the 1938 World Cup. His characteristic was sportsmanship as he never once being cautioned or sent off in his career. Although he was of much below-average height for a goalkeeper, he was an effective shot stopper, and his acrobatic style was fulfilled by his superb agility. Planicka incredibly appeared in 969 matches for his club Slavia Prague. In 1985, UNESCO gave him the international fair play award. In 1999, the IFFHS elected him the best Czech goalkeeper, the 6th best European goalkeeper and and 9th best overall – of the 20th century. In 2003, he was cataloged as the greatest goalkeeper of his era.

Nemanja Vidić



Individual Accomplishments:

ESM Team of the Year: 2007, 2009, 2011
FIFAPro World XI: 2009, 2011
Premier League Player of the Season: 2009, 2011 (only player to win it twice with Ronaldo and Henry)
Premier League Team of the Season: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
Ballon D'Or: 21st in 2008 and 16th in 2009
Serbian Player of the Year:
Premier League 20 Seasons XI

Team Accomplishments:

Premier League winner: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
UEFA Champions League winner: 2008
UEFA Champions League runner-up: 2009, 2011
Football League Cup: 2006, 2009, 2010
FIFA Club World Cup: 2008
Yugoslav Cup: 2002
Serbia and Montenegro Cup: 2004

Profile:

Nemanja first emerged as a defender to be reckoned with during the Qualification Rounds of the 2006 World Cup - where Serbia and Montenegro surrendered just 1 goal over the course of 10 games in a group consisting of the likes of Spain, Belgium and Bosnia & Herzegovina. That defensive line is now known as Serbia's 'Famous Four' - and propelled the nation to the top of Group 7 against all odds. Over the course of a glittering 8 year career at Manchester United, Vidić emerged as not only one of the greatest defenders to grace the league, but was amongst the premier centerbacks in Europe - an aggressive, no-nonsense tackler; he would always put his body on the line with gaping wounds and broken noses being a consistent reminder of his commitment - an immovable object in the heart of a defense that was the best on the continent for the better part of half a decade whilst leading the team to 3 Champions League finals in 4 seasons at his peak. Here, he pairs up with a defender very much in the mold of Rio Ferdinand in Anton Ondruš - who was renowned for his perceptiveness, polished ability on the ball and languid stature.

Anton Ondruš



Individual Accomplishments:

EURO 1976 Team of the Tournament
Ballon D'Or: 6th in 1976
Czechoslovakia Player of the Year 3rd: 1974, 1975, 1977

Team Accomplishments:

UEFA European Championship winner: 1976
UEFA European Championship Bronze medal: 1980
Czechoslovak First League Championship: 1974, 1975
Czechoslovak Cup: 1974
Slovak Cup: 1972, 1974, 1976

Profile


Widely regarded as one of the best central defenders of his era, 'Beckenbauer of the East' Ondruš was also a legendary captain - who had an excellent mixture of strength and elegance, allied with good pace on the ball, towering aerial prowess, dribbling ability from the heart of defense and had an exquisite passing range for the position. At club level, apart from being a world class technical center-half or sweeper, Anton scored 38 goals in 210 games at his peak. For the Czechoslovakian national team - his zenith came in 1974 - where his superb performance against Cruyff‘s Netherlands in semi-finals (where he scored twice) opened his team the door to the final match where Czechoslovakia won the gold medal in the famous Belgrade night game against the then world champion Germany (featuring Beckenbauer, Hoeneß, Vogts and Maier).

https://footballski.fr/euro-2016-xi-legende-anton-ondrus-beckenbauer-est

Dan Petrescu



Individual Accomplishments:

Premier League Overseas Team of the Decade

Team Accomplishments:

European Cup Runner-up: 1989
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup: 1998
Romanian League: 1986, 1988, 1989
FA Cup: 1997
League Cup: 1998
Romanian Cup: 1987, 1989
UEFA Super Cup: 1998

Profile

Widely regarded as one of the best hybrid fullbacks of his era, and arguably the best right fullback in Premier League history, Petrescu starred in the 1994 World Cup for a Romania team also featuring Hagi and Popescu. Renowned for his quickness, mazy dribbling skills, and consistent offensive output - he was a lethal wingback in full flow. At club level, he emerged at Steaua București - reaching the European Cup semi-finals in 1988, and the European Cup final in 1989. His next big move was to Chelsea where he's fondly remembered for his lung bursting runs and being part of their mid to late '90s success with the likes of Gianfranco Zola, Ruud Gullit and Marcel Desailly.

Yuri Zhirkov



Individual Accomplishments:

2008 Ballon D'Or nominee
EURO 2008 Team of the Tournament
Russian Footballer of the Year: 2008
UEFA Cup Highest assists: 2009

Team Accomplishments:

UEFA Cup: 2005
Premier League winner: 2010
Russian Premier League winner: 2005, 2006
FA Cup: 2010
Russian Cup: 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009
Russian Super-Cup: 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2016

Profile


Zhirkov burst on to the scene for PFC CSKA Moskva as a tricky left-winger during their run to victory in the 2004/05 UEFA Cup via FC Spartak Tambov − his home-town club − scoring six goals in 25 appearances as CSKA finished runners-up to FC Lokomotiv Moskva in the 2004 Premier-Liga. For several years, Zhirkov demonstrated great abilities on the football pitch: venomous crosses, precise passes, solid defending, and the odd thunder shot – he had it all in his arsenal. However, he truly came of age at international level as a decisive left-back/wingback hybrid at UEFA EURO 2008 - propelling Russia to the semi-finals of the competition with Andrey Arshavin and Roman Pavlyuchenko - leading to the Footballer of the Year in Russia award and nomination for the EURO Team of the Tournament, as well as the Ballon D'Or.

Svatopluk Pluskal



Individual Accomplishments:


1963 Ballon D'Or: 21

Team Accomplishments:

World Cup Runner-up: 1962
Central European International Cup: 1955-60
Czechoslovak League champion: 1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966
America Cup: 1961, 1962, 1963
Czechoslovak Cup: 1961, 1965, 1966

Profile

Arguably the best defensive midfield anchor in the pool, Pluskal was a world-class operator who could down to play as center-back as well - and Czechoslovakia never lost a Central European International Cup with him in the team. Thanks to his important contribution to the success in World Cup at Chile, Pluskal received recognition on the international stage. On October 23, 1963, he was a member of the "Rest of the World" team that played England at Wembley in front of 100,000 fans, to celebrate 100 years of English football with Yashin-Djalma-Schnellinger-Popluhar-Masopust-Kopa-Di Stéfano-Gento-Eusébio Next year he played for the "Europe" team in Belgrade. Pluskal's career was ended by a knee injury in 1967. In the league he played 282 matches. He was a complete defensive footballer, a good header of the ball, and he was famous for his slide tackles, with which he cleanly took the ball from his opponents. Although players often protested against this style of play, referees usually considered it to be within the rules. During his football career, this tireless fighter became an impenetrable shield, able to concentrate on what was needed.

Fyodor Cherenkov



Individual Accomplishments:

Soviet Footballer of the Year: 1983, 1989
Soviet Footballer of the Year Bronze: 1985, 1988
USSR All Stars Team Championship: 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989
USSR Top assists: 1988, 1989

Team Accomplishments:

Olympic Bronze: 1980
Soviet Top League Champion: 1979, 1987, 1989
Soviet Top League Runner-up: 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1991
Russian Premier League winner: 1993
Russian Cup: 1994

Profile

There are players, whose name is inextricably linked with the name of their club. This was a great Yashin in Dynamo, Streltsov in Torpedo, Kipiani in Tbilisi, and Cherenkov in Spartak. He was the ultimate modern-day Russian legend, an idolised player and the greatest artist imaginable. He was a ray of light in a ruthless and cynical world, a source of pure joy and a reminder how people should behave. The fact that Cherenkov never played at the World Cup or even the European Championship is a criminal injustice. Lobanovsky was in charge of the Soviet team for most of the '80s - albeit together with Beskov in 1982 - and he never found room for Cherenkov's silky skills in his system that saw improvisation as secondary. The midfielder got only 32 caps for the USSR but still managed to score 12 goals, and was probably just too old by the time his turn in the bigger leagues came around - much like Anatoliy Demyanenko (another Soviet Footballer of the Year from his era).

Nándor Hidegkuti



Individual Accomplishments:

1954 FIFA World Cup All-Stars Team
Hungarian Football Federation Player of the Year: 1953
MTK Hungary Greatest Player of all time
Voted 6th in Greatest Hungarian Footballers poll

Team Accomplishments:

Olympic Champion: 1952
World Cup Runner-up: 1954
Central European Champion: 1953
Hungarian League champion: 1951, 1953, 1958
Hungarian Cup: 1952
Mitropa Cup: 1955

Profile


Hidegkuti is considered to be one of the greatest proponents of the receding forward position as a False 9, and also the biggest inspiration behind the modern #10 role. One of the great attackers in 'The Mighty Magyars' Hungarian golden team during the early 1950s, He scored twice on his debut for the national team, and two years later, he made his second international appearance and scored a hat-trick against Bulgaria. In 1953, Hidegkuti scored a hat-trick for Hungary when they beat England 6-3 at Wembley Stadium. Playing from deep, Hidegkuti was able to distribute the ball to the other four attackers and cause considerable confusion in the English defense. This was an innovation at the time and revolutionized the way the game was played. It's widely claimed that for all the attention that the strikers Puskás and Kocsis received during the Hungarian Golden Team, it was always inside forward Hidegkuti that was the puppetmaster. It was a simple but brilliant move that allowed him to prosper: he simply played further back as the game progressed. Perhaps he would have been held in greater light if not for the fact that he was half a decade to a decade older than most of his team-mates, and never quite hit his peak at the same time as them given his advancing age, and never got to play in the bigger leagues of Europe.

Gyula Zsengellér



Individual Accomplishments:

Voted 9th in Greatest Hungarian Footballers poll
World Cup Second highest scorer: 1938
European Top scorer: 1939, 1945
Mitropa Cup Top Scorer
Hungarian League Top Scorer: 1938, 1939, 1943, 1944, 1945
Hungarian League third highest scorer of all time
0.82 goals per game for Hungary

Team Accomplishments:

1938 World Cup Runner-up
Hungarian League Champion: 1939, 1946, 1946, 1947
Mitropa Cup Winner: 1939

Profile

Gyula Zsengeller is one of the greatest Hungarian forwards of all-time. Capable of operating at both inside forward positions, or as a lone striker - he was a rising star of world football at the turn of the late 1930s and the early 1940s. Unfortunately, Zsengeller was also very injury prone - he had several heavy injuries, especially his knees but he was still really phenomenal striker, very complete - amazing dribbler, booming shooter, lightning pace, stamina, good header, good short passer, great in and out the penalty box. In World Cup 1938, he was one of the biggest stars - finishing behind Leônidas as the top scorer. In the 1938 - 1939 Hungarian league season, he made phenomenon record with 56 goals in 26 games which is one of the highest ratios in history of professional football league game.He is the third-highest goalscorer of all-time in the Hungarian league as a holder of record the most Hungarian league top scorers with five. IFFHS named him the 7th most successful Top Division Goal Scorer of all time.

Ivan Gudelj



Individual Accomplishments:

1979 UEFA European Under-18 Championship Player of the Tournament
Yugoslav Player of the Year: 1982
L'Équipe Group Stage All-Star XI: 1982 World Cup

Team Accomplishments:

Yugoslav First League Champion: 1979
Yugoslav First League Runner-up: 1981, 1983
1979 UEFA European Under-18 Championship
Yugoslav Cup: 1984

Profile


Ivan Gudelj is widely to considered to be among the most talented but unfortunate midfielders in the history of the Yugoslav/Croatia national team, and an inspiration for future Croatian midfielders of his ilk in Zvonimir Boban and Niko Kranjčar. A tall, quick, elegant midfielder on the ball (earning the moniker - Beckenbauer of Zmijavci), he was a prolific scorer from deeper position while patrolling both ends of the pitch as a box-to-box - evidenced by his record of 93 goals in 362 games for Hajduk Split, and equally industrious off it in terms of defensive workrate, tracking ability, and positional awareness/tactical nous. For the national team, he starred in the 1980 Olympics, before starting in the 1982 World Cup (and was highlighted by L'Équipe as a member of the Group Stage All-Star XI) and being a prominent member of Yugoslavia's EURO 1984 squad with Stojković, Vujović and Sušić. Following that, he was offered lucrative contracts by both Real Madrid and Bordeaux. But at the age most midfielders start to hit their peak, Gudelj was forced to retire at 26 because of severe health issues that prohibited him from continuing on the field (including a bout of Hepatitis B), drawing the curtains on the playing career of someone who could've been the first Croatian to play for Madrid before Prosinečki.

Alen Bokšić



Individual Accomplishments:

Ballon D'Or 4th: 1993
Onze de Argent: 1993
Croatian Footballer of the Year: 1993
Ligue 1 Player of the Year: 1993
Ligue 1 Top Scorer: 1993

Team Accomplishments:

UEFA Champions League: 1993
Serie A winner: 1997, 2000
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup: 1999
Italian Cup: 1998, 2000
Intercontinental Cup: 1996
Yugoslav Cup: 1991

Profile


Alen Bokšić was a legendary Croatian striker - not quite a prolific scorer in terms of being a poacher, but instead a powerful, fast and tireless worker who fit into most attacking positions with relative ease (like with Šuker for the national team), and hit his peak as the attacking catalyst of the famous Marseille team that won the Champions League against Milan - before being voted fourth in the 1993 Ballon D'Or poll. He also won two Serie A titles in 1997 and 2000 with Juventus and Lazio respectively, and is regarded as one of the best foreign players in the history of Serie A since 1980. Following Croatia's independence from Yugoslavia, Bokšić became an integral part of Croatia's national team in the 1990s. He played for Croatia at the 1996 EUROs but was unfortunately not included in the squad for the 1998 World Cup in France due to an injury he suffered only weeks before the tournament - thus missing out on Croatia's semi-final run and more fame in the minds of casual watchers. To this day, discussions revolve around Croatia's potential World Cup win had Bokšić been fit enough to partner Šuker up front.

Hrvoje Štrok



Individual Accomplishments:


HNK Rijeka Top Goalscorer: 2011

Team Accomplishments:

Croatian First Divison: 2002
Croatian Cup: 2004

Profile

Words cant describe him...
 

Tuppet

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Thanks @Enigma_87 for Cajkovski quotes -

His jump and header was something special. He never marked opposition's attacker so closely, when the ball was in the air and going toward them. First, he always knew where the ball is going to fall, and then when he realized where the ball is going, he would start to run and then jumped (that gave him advantage in the air, because everybody else waited for the ball, and then jumped from the place they were standing all that time). Using all of these things (his jump, reading of the game, positioning), he was often superior in the air, even when he guarded much higher players.
One time, he had to go to the operation (they removed him one of his toenails). On the same day Partizan should play friendly match against one team from Sweden. Nobody thought that Čik will play (because doctors advised him to stay off the field for 7 days). But, he asked for the football shoes (one was for a number or two bigger than the other, since he had bandages on operated foot), got them, and played the whole match. He played on his standard level. After the match, the bandage on his operated foot was covered with blood, but he didn't complain (in fact, that wouldn't be known, if Bobek didn't notice). That's what kind of player was Čik.
Hungarian national team coach from '50s, Gusztáv Sebes, gave a statement, after seeing friendly game between Partizan and Honved, that before the game he couldn't decide who is better half player in Europe, Čajkovski or Bozsik. After the game he was completely sure that Čajkovski is the best half player in Europe.
Čik had a lot of legendary duels with the opposition attackers, during his career, but one probably stands out from the others. Partizan was on the South-American tour and they had to play against Peñarol (beside other teams). The day of the game came, players came out on the field, referee was there, fans were there, but the start of the game was being postponed. Partizan players were wondering what is happening, and than they saw. 10-15 minutes after the game should start, the biggest star of Peñarol, Schiaffino, was coming on the field, with the crowd cheering like they were in trans. While he was coming on the field, Bobek said something to Čik, that probably struck the nerve. Čik was very eager to play, and he couldn't wait for the game start. Since the game started and right until the end, Schiaffino couldn't be found on the field. He was so outplayed by Čik, that he couldn't receive the ball for 15 minutes in a row. On top of that Čik dribbled, assisted and joined the attack. Miloš Milutinović later said that all Partizan players knew, that after that "movie star" entrance made by Schiaffino and Bobek's words, Čajkovski is going to be the best player on the field.
Cajkovski was generally rated as the best center half in the world along with the likes of Bozsik and Ocwirk. Along with Beara & Vukas he was one of the leaders of a great Yugoslavian team reaching two Olympic finals and to quarter finals of WC 54. His status in world football was also confirmed by him getting selected for FIFA world XI to play a game against England in 1953 to celebrate 90th anniversary of FA.


 

Tuppet

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Bulgaria's Trifon Ivanov remembered for rugged looks and performances

Bulgaria's Trifon Ivanov, a key member of their 1994 World Cup side, has passed away.
Once upon a time, when he still was an active player, Trifon Ivanov bought a tank. He purchased it directly from the army, without ammunition, and drove the meadows of countryside in his spare time.

Eventually, he became bored with the tank and sold it. Ivanov, who passed away on Saturday aged 50 following a heart attack, was truly one of a kind.

Football lovers would easily recognise Ivanov after his remarkable performances for Bulgaria at the 1994 World Cup in the United States. He was imperious at the heart of the team that sensationally reached the semifinals, but also very noticeable because of his unusual looks. Big, broadly built, sporting long hair and a huge beard, he was nicknamed "The Wolf". His presence on the pitch was intimidating in the extreme.

Ahead of the quarterfinal clash against Germany, Ivanov amusingly told his coach Dimitar Penev not to worry: "Just relax. With my bloodthirsty look, they will be scared to death. Rudi Voller will fall to the ground when he feels my breath."

He had a superb game in a 2-1 win, best remembered for Yordan Lechkov's flying header. Ivanov's biggest moment came when he threw himself to block a fierce shot from Lothar Matthaus.

Such a selfless style endeared Trifon to all of Bulgaria. Levski Sofia fans are known to dislike CSKA Sofia players, past and present. They despise Hristo Stoichkov, for example, but Ivanov -- who had four spells at CSKA and won three league titles with them -- is adored even by the Levski faithful.

"Trifon is respected by everyone, because it is impossible to hate him. He was a person who united all around him," Bulgarian journalist Konstantin Simidchiyski told ESPN FC.

That was indeed the case in the national team, where the dressing room was usually torn between Stoichkov's friends from CSKA and the Levski Sofia camp led by Borislav Mikhailov and Nasko Sirakov.

"I helped them negotiate with each other. Sometimes Stoichkov wouldn't train, claiming that his leg hurt, and they would immediately demand to know what's going on.

"I asked them to let him rest, and smoothed everything," Ivanov remembered.

His contribution to Bulgaria was immense ever since his debut in April 1988 -- bizarrely as a midfielder -- and duly scored from a Sirakov corner in a 1-1 draw with East Germany.

Ivanov scored six goals in 76 appearances for the national team and two of them stand out.

The first was the phenomenal volley against Wales in Cardiff that opened the score en route to their 3-0 win in Euro 96 qualifiers. Trifon received the ball on the edge of the penalty area and sent a stunner into the top corner without letting it touch the ground -- a strike of pure class by any player, let alone a rugged defender.

He possessed a great shooting technique from the days when he played as a striker at Etar Veliko Tarnovo, before one of the youth coaches decided that he was better suited to play at the back.


Many fans will remember Trifon Ivanov for his unique style.
The second was a superb header against Russia in the 1998 World Cup qualifiers. The 1-0 win made sure the Bulgarians finished top of the group ahead of their rivals and qualified for the tournament, which eventually turned out to be immensely disappointing. Bulgaria took just one point at the group stages, and captain Ivanov retired after the 6-1 thrashing at the hands of Spain.

That fact is somewhat symbolic, because Trifon started his Western European adventure in Spain after moving from CSKA Sofia to Real Betis in December 1990. He was so impressive in his first games that Johan Cruyff wanted to sign him for Barcelona, since Ronald Koeman was out injured. However, Betis owner Manuel Ruiz de Lopera refused to sell his star man.

"We need you here," he told Ivanov and blocked what could have been the greatest opportunity of his career. Betis were relegated that season, and Ivanov was loaned out to Etar and CSKA before playing in Segunda Division in 1992-93 season.

Trifon managed to make some headlines at Camp Nou nevertheless. Ahead of the defender's first game at the stadium in February 1991, Stoichkov -- who was suspended for the fixture -- visited his close friend at the hotel.

"We will score four goals against you," the striker said.

"I am not sure about that, but I will score twice myself," Ivanov replied.

Stoichkov laughed at such a bizarre claim and agreed to buy the defender a bottle of whiskey and let him drive his new BMW if that indeed happened. Eventually, both were right. Barcelona won 4-2, with both Betis goals coming from Ivanov's penalties. He enjoyed driving Stoichkov's car very much.

Betis fondly remember their great Bulgarian defender to this day. Juan Merino, their current coach who played alongside Ivanov, once said: "He looked like he came from the wilderness, and was brave enough to say things others were afraid to. That is why he became our captain."

After leaving Spain in 1993, Ivanov spent two seasons at Neuchatel Xamax in Switzerland, where he used to clash with coach Gilbert Gress. Trifon loved to tell an amusing story about how the club president forced Gress to play him despite the fact he was supposed to be out of the squad.

"I was sitting in the cafeteria, drinking coffee and smoking a cigarette when the president came along.

"'What are you doing here?' he asked. 'I am not playing today,' I said," Ivanov recalled.

The game had already started when the coach stunned the Bulgarian, asking him to warm up. He came on and headed home a last minute winner.


Trifon Ivanov earned 76 caps for Bulgaria, the highlight being their run to the semifinals at USA '94.
Ivanov's best personal season was probably in 1995-96, when he signed for Rapid Vienna. The club won the title in Austria and also reached the Cup Winners' Cup final, beating Sporting Lisbon, Dynamo Moscow and Feyenoord on their way to the big occasion.

"It is a game that I will never forget. Only four Bulgarians have ever took part in a European final -- Stoichkov, Emil Kostadinov, Dimitar Berbatov and myself. It is a great honour. I am glad that I had such an experience," Trifon remembered in his last interview. He had a decent performance that evening in Brussels, marking Rai and Youri Djorkaeff, but Paris Saint Germain won 1-0.

Ivanov was voted Player of the Year in Bulgaria in 1996, and played in the Champions League with Rapid, who took two points from six games against Manchester United, Juventus and Fenerbahce. The game at Old Trafford was especially memorable, not least because he exchanged shirts with Eric Cantona.

"After the final whistle many Rapid players ran over to him, but the Frenchman said that his shirt is saved for Trifon Ivanov," the Bulgarian proudly remembered.

After retiring from football in 2001, Ivanov preferred to lead a quiet life, close to his home town of Veliko Tarnovo. His legendary status never diminished, and occasional interviews were always eagerly awaited by fans all over Bulgaria. The country might have known more naturally talented players in the golden era of the 90s, but nobody was universally loved more than Trifon, fondly known as Tunyo.

http://www.espnfc.us/blog/espn-fc-united-blog/68/post/2808668/bulgaria-hero-trifon-ivanov-remembered

Some of his highlights here -
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There are way too many to actually link here, here is a very well made video with all his defensive highlights -
 

Raees

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Think the number of great players that will become available for the next round is higher than usual it seems than recent drafts. Spoilt for choice.
 

Enigma_87

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Davor Šuker - world cup legend and the best forward the Croats had

A country like Croatia, young and only recently out of the horrors of war, already had its fair share of memorable events. Nonetheless, for 25 minutes of the semi-final match between France and the debutants, Croatia, created a generational myth – a myth which, in time, became in equal parts national pride and a burden to the future generations of the Croatian national team.

The Croatian team of the time, mostly composed of members of the famous Chilean expedition which had, bearing the emblems of the Yugoslav youth team, won the U21 World Cup. While Davor Šuker wasn’t one of them, he remains the best center forward Croatia ever had, and France ’98 saw him in arguably the high point of his career.

The late Frane Matošić, legendary member of Hajduk Split, once highlighted the peculiar fact that Šuker was neither ambidextrous nor was a quite convincing header of the ball, both of which is hard to deny. On the other hand, Šuker had an almost uncanny sense of positioning in the box which he used to devastating effect. Even before the World Cup the footballing world already had the chance to witness his talent (for example, his performance at the 1996 European Championship in England where he scored against Denmark’s legendary Peter Schmeichel with a clinical finish). But only after his 6 goals and the title as the World Cup’s Golden Boot in France had him initiated in the footballing center forward’s pantheon.

Šuker left his mark on Croatia’s road to France after providing some of the key goals, like the one against Greece in Thesalloniki, while being paired up with another one of Yugoslavia’s youth team Chilean, Alen Bokšić (the player who scored the decisive goal against Ukraine in Kiev). Bokšić missed the World Cup after suffering an injury blow; a huge handicap for Croatia, which resulted in Šuker bearing most of the team’s goalscoring responsibilities. After all, although Bokšić’s form dipped in Italy (following his successful time with Marseilles where he was crowned Ligue 1’s top scorer in 1993, with 23 goals), he was still considered one of the top forwards of Serie A. In the end, the Croatian team travelled to France with Šuker and the young Goran Vlaović as the two forwards. The team manager Miroslav Blažević used Vlaović sparingly, preferring to play Šuker as the lone striker in the nominal 3-5-2 formation that became, in practice, 3-6-1 or even 5-4-1, with one of Croatia’s creative players joining the midfield.

Šuker started his scoring spree in the opening matches against Jamaica and Japan, picking up the ball around the eleven-meter mark before scoring with his left foot in both instances. Croatia won both matches and qualified for the second round, losing the only match in which Šuker didn’t score (the 1:0 reverse against Argentina). In the second round Croatia faced the Romanian team lead by the likes of Gheorge Popescu and Gheorge Hagi (“The Carpatian Maradona”). Croatia advanced into the quarters via a somewhat dubious penalty kick after tightly matched up 90 minutes. Two pieces of trivia followed the spot kick – Asanović (the fouled Croatian player) knowingly smiled after being asked about the decision in a post-match interview and Šuker, the player who converted the penalty in the end, had to re-take the spot kick after the referee deemed the first take illegal. Šuker hit the back of the net both times after measuring his pulse and effortlessly planting the ball in the left-hand corner of Bogdan Stelea’s goal. Croatia was through to the quarter-finals, and with an extra motivational boost ahead of that match vs Germany, a strong title contender at the time.

Two years earlier in England, these two teams met in quarter-final as well, but this time it was at the European Championship. That game, played at Old Trafford, had seen Germany go through with a 2-1 victory, with Matthias Sammer scoring a goal after what appeared to be a clear foul made on Croatia’s defender, Nikola Jerkan. Swedish referee Leif Snudell had more than a few dubious decisions on both sides throughout the game, but this one perhaps made the headlines due to the fact that it led to a winning goal. It should also be noted that the Croatian equaliser was scored by – take a guess – Davor Šuker, when he dribbled pass Kopke after an error from German defenders. The two sides met again at the Stade Gerland in the World Cup, and Croatia had no love lost towards Berti Vogs’ side. With three beautiful goals Croatia marked that night with the biggest win in its history. Šuker scored the third one with a placed shot that ended up under Kopke, making the famous goalkeeper look ordinary. With four goals to his name, Šuker had already become a serious challenger for a World Cup Golden boot award. Croatia booked its place in the semi-final clash against the hosts, France.

Stade de France, World Cup semi-final. Both Croatia’s and Šuker’s fairytale seemed to be destined for a happy ending after Šuker scored an opener in 46th minute, once again showing his amazing anticipation. He followed the path of a great through ball by Asanović, collected it, and managed to put it past Barthez despite the lack of space. At that very moment, Croatia was at the verge of accomplishing the impossible – knocking France out of the tournament and making its way into the final.

But, two of the most significant moments in Lillian Thuram’s history as a French international sent Les Bleus, deservedly, into the final match versus Brazil. However, Croatia hadn’t succumbed to lethargy, as the bronze medal had yet to be forged in a third-place playoff versus the Dutch. In an action packed match, Croatia managed to get the best out of their few chances with a 2-1 victory, leaving Holland in a frustrated closure where they had perhaps been the better side in both, the semi-final and third place playoff, but failed to capitalize the advantage. Šuker however had another obligation in that match; if he managed to score a goal vs Holland, he would leave Ronaldo two goals behind in the race for the Golden boot ahead of the Final. And so he did, scoring a victorious goal with a beautifully placed Outside of the Boot shot, that went in between Jaap Stam’s legs and in the lower corner of Van Der Sar’s net. That goal was more than a consolidation for Croatian side and Šuker as well, ending the tournament in fashion with six goals, bronze medal around his neck and a Golden boot in his hands.


Šuker never really had the chance to repeat his big success, considering the fact that he was well over his peak in Korea & Japan four years later, where Croatia just couldn’t find a proper balance between the remains of that famous nineties’ generation and the youngsters that were introduced into the team. The team made an early exit from the tournament after just three games in group stage, which also meant Šuker ending his lasting career in the Croatian jersey, with 45 goals in 69 matches – a goalscoring record that probably won’t be surpassed any time soon.

His club career was marked with some excellent achievements as well.

He started his career at the age of 16 with the local team NK Osijek in 1984 before being transferred to Croatia’s biggest club side Dinamo Zagreb in 1989.

Šuker’s performances in Zagreb caught the attention of many clubs and in 1991, he moved to Spanish club Sevilla, where he would play with the great Diego Maradona.

In the five seasons that he spent at the Estadio Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan, Šuker finished among the league’s top scorers with a tally of 24 goals, including five braces and one hat-trick.

Then, the biggest move of his career – to Real Madrid in 1996.

He enjoyed immediate success with Madrid scoring another 24 goals in the league in his first season. His partnership with Predrag Mijatovic guided Real to the league title, followed by another three hat-tricks during the 1996/1997 season.

The following season Šuker became a European champion after Real Madrid defeated Juventus in the 1998 UEFA Champions league final.

Nicknamed “The Wizard” or “Sukerman” after the cartoon superhero “Superman”, Šuker would enjoy an illustrious international career with Croatia leading the country to unexpected highs after they took the world stage by storm in the late 90’s.


What made Šuker really special was not his blistering pace as he wasn't that type of forward. Instead he had one of the best shooting techniques, coupled with excellent positional sense and movement around and out of the box. Add to that his special skills on the ball and you have one of the most complete strikers that graced the 90's.

Šuker reached the heights of his club career winning the CL and La Liga with Real, while his illustrious international career will be fondly remembered by all Croats and those who loved his beautiful style of play.

@harms
 

Enigma_87

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Yevgeniy Rudakov


The Muscovite started his career with FC Torpedo Moskva, but spent most of his playing days with Dynamo, winning six Soviet titles and three USSR Cups as well as the 1975 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and UEFA Super Cup. He was the Soviet Union's player of the year in 1971, and his nation's top goalkeeper in 1969, 1971 and 1972.

Capped 42 times for the senior team, not including Olympic games, Rudakov was first-choice goalkeeper at the 1972 European finals in Belgium, enhancing his reputation with a splendid penalty save in the 1-0 semi-final victory against Hungary. However, he could not sway the final itself, which West Germany won 3-0. He won Olympic bronze in Munich a few months later.

At the Olympic Games 1972 he earned four wins and two shutouts. He also won 21 games with the regular senior squad and finished 22 games without allowing any goals. His career goals against average was at 0.69.

During his successful career he received numerous individual accolades and awards:
- UEFA European Championship Team of the Tournament: 1972
- Ukrainian Footballer of the Year: 1971
- Soviet Footballer of the Year: 1971
- Best goalkeeper of the USSR in 1969, 1971, and 1972


and one of the not many keepers nominated twice for Ballon D'or in 1971 and 1972 finishing 12th and 18th respectively.

Rudakov was one of the best Soviet keepers in history - probably third after the greats Yashin and Dasaev, but his impeccable positioning, excellent reflexes and ability on one on ones, with his dependable and solid performances make him one of the best in his position in the 70's - something which was well and truly noted by the footballing world as he received multiple individual awards and acclaims.

In recent unanimous poll he was selected as the best goalkeeper in history of Ukrainian football.
 
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Enigma_87

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Revaz Dzodzuashvili



Revaz Dzodzuashvili
is former Georgian defender. He's one(if not the best Georgian defenders of all time) and one of the best Soviet full backs. Dzodzuashvili started his career as striker, moving on to midfield and eventually ended up in defence. First as center back but than due to his great speed started to play as right back. He was excellent man marker, famous for completely shutting out from the game some of the best players in that era like - Best, Lubanski, Džajić and Heynckes.

He was one of the best tacklers of that era, who also liked to join the attack, knew to make good cross from the flank and had fast legs able to cover a lot of distance. The pupil of the school football Torpedo (Kutaisi). In the ninth grade (1962) played for the team "Imereti". He was invited to Dinamo (Tbilisi) in 1963. There he played as a forward, he didn't make that position his own and returned to Kutaisi "Torpedo".

Afterwards he played in midfield for Dinamo (Sukhumi). At the same time, Torpedo (Kutaisi) led by Blinkov, began to build a new team. They were looking for a solid defense counsel and coach Yuri Gramatikopulo recommended the young player. In that team Dzodzuashvili started as a center back, but shortly after he was moved to the right to use his great speed and aggressive style.

Dzodzuashvili soon left Kutaisi. In 1968, he was invited to play for Dinamo Tbilisi led by Vyacheslav Solovyov. In that Dinamo team he spent his best years and was always among the top spots domestically - finishing 3rd in 69,71,72 and 76 and runners up for the Soviet cup.

Revaz had an excellent international career peaking in 1972 where he finished second at the EURO, along with fellow players Rudakov and Kaplychnyi, and winning the bronze in the Summer Olympics the same year - a tournament which was still in high regards at that time.

Dzodzuashvili excelled in the 72 EURO making it in the team of the tournament along with the goalkeeper Rudakov.

Additional description by @harms:

The best defensive right-back in USSR history. When the Soviet team found out that they were to play North Ireland in the qualifications, they immediately started a competition for a right-back place in the national side. The main question was, obviously, who is going to man-mark the best player in the world, George Best. 9 right-backs were chosen from all over the country for a trial and Dzodzuashvili proved to be the best. He studied Best for 6 months by watching the same 20-minute film over and over again, and when the time did come, he was prepared. He kept Best quiet that day, and in their next fixture Best was almost non-existent because of Dzodzuashvili’s man-marking skills. On the verge of success he also played personally against Dzajic - and for the first 20 minutes everything went wrong, Revaz was too confident and Dzajic was using it for his advantage. But after that he managed to get back in the game and Dzajic was well-handled by him for the next 70 minutes and also for the next 4 games, even Dzajic said that he was in Dzodzuashvili’s pocket in that games.
 

Enigma_87

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Vladimir Kaplychnyi




Nicknamed «Wolfhound» he was a very tough and physical defender. Like Blankenburg he was unlucky to be born at the same time as the two of the Soviet greatest ever defenders - Schesternyov and Khurtsilava, yet he managed to earn 62 caps for his country - and that says something. He participated in 1968 Euro, where Soviet lost by a coin toss in the semis and in 1972 Euro, where USSR lost to an all-time great German side in the final. Also a great leader of men, he inherited the captain armband both in CSKA and USSR after Albert Schesternyov retired.

Kaplychnyi was excellent marker who achieved success both at domestic and international level - winning the Soviet championship in 1970 along with Shesternyov and runner up for the Soviet cup in 1967, while also finishing runner up in the 1972 EURO and bronze medalist in 1972 Olympic games along with Rudakov and Dzodzuashvili.
 

Enigma_87

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Robert Gadocha - one of the best pure wingers that came out from Poland



Poland is a country notable of producing some great wingers, but the top three are undoubtedly Lato, Boniek and Gadocha. The latter was a probably Poland's best ever pure winger, and in the early 1970's was regarded as one of the world's best left wingers (was forced to play on the left for Poland due Lato's preference of the right). He was capable of playing on either wing and very versatile in his game. Gadocha possesed exquisite close control of the ball, easily able to beat opponents in 1-1 situations without the need for extreme pace. Was also Capable of delivering immaculate crosses from either wing, which would often arc high into the air and dip like motar shells onto their intended targets (of the 16 goals scored by Poland in the 1974 World Cup, 5 were directly assisted by Gadocha, another two came from crosses that were headed down by Szarmach for Lato). Gadocha rounded off his abilities with a venomous freekick.

Gadocha was a pioneer in Polish football. He became the first player to join a western club. After his performances in the 1972 Olympics, Gadocha recieved offers from Bayern Munich and Real Madrid (who even flew a representative to Warsaw, to try and buy passage out of the country), but Gadocha was unwilling to leave without being legally able to do so. Thus after another fantastic display in the 1974 World Cup, Edward Gierek, Poland's First Secretary of State, began the bureaucratic process of allowing Gadocha to leave for the West. After nine months of paper shuffling, he was allowed to join FC Nantes in 1975. France being the obvious destination, as Gierek had spent nearly fifteen years of his youth there.

Gadocha was a special player - he was very explosive and can change the pace of the game with his top notch dribbling skills, movement and bursts of acceleration. He wasn't only dependent on pace as he could easily dribble his way out of a phone booth, but he had it in his locker especially displayed in the 1974 WC where there was a collection of direct and pacy players in that Polish team.


Some description thanks to @Joga Bonito:

One of the stars of the Polish 1974 WC team which finished third - Robert Gadocha, the Polish Garrincha. Gadocha was an immensely creative winger whose deliveries would often arc high into the air finding their target in the box. Gadocha even went by another name - Pilate, for his penchant for accurate crosses :lol:. In fact of the 16 goals that Poland scored in the 1974 WC finals, 5 were directly assisted by Gadocha (the most assists in the tournament with Cruyff coming second with 3 assists) and two more were from crosses by Gadocha, which were headed down by Szarmach to Lato. It was no wonder that Lato and Szarmach would go on to win the golden boot and the silver boot in the WC 1974, with such a creative force in Gadocha being the primary supplyline, with Deyna running the show.

He had a successful domestic career winning two Polish Championships and a Polish Cup and came close to European glory in 1969/70, where Legia Warsaw just fell out to eventual victors Feyenoord in the semi finals of the European Cup. Gadocha was pivotal as he scored 3 goals and made several assists in Legia Warsaw's European campaign that year. Despite his creative talents, Gadocha was an excellent goalscorer and is the 4th highest goalscorer in Legia Warsaw history, scoring 88 goals in 279 appearances.
 

harms

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Alright, all three threads are up, you can always find a links to them in the third post of this thread (bookmarked)
 

Enigma_87

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Ladislav Novák


Ladislav Novák was a Czechoslovak footballer and regarded one of the best left-back of his era. Novák became a captained Czechoslovakia national team at 1962 FIFA World Cup. He was left-back with good fighting spirit, fast, clever and had excellent header. He can go to overlap to join attack and give passing from left-side. Novák also know for his gentle of the game. As a sign of the good spirit in which he played, the defenders remarkably never received a red card throughout his career. He played 75 times for Czechoslovak national team, 71 times as captain.

Captain of Czechoslovakia in 71 of the 75 internationals he played, Novák was leader of the talented team that finished third at the 1960 UEFA European Championship and runners-up at the 1962 FIFA World Cup. Especially strong in the air, he was a commanding presence on the domestic scene too, securing eight Czechoslovak titles with FK Dukla Praha. He won the championship with Dukla as a coach in 1982 and took charge of a number of Belgian clubs during the 1970s and 1980s as well as the Czech national side. He was also part of 1960 European Championship Team of The Tournament.

Defensive line leader he was very organized and influential in his style. Where he also excelled was his technique and passing skills which were notable at the time, and could easily start an attack from the back.