Fantasy Reads

Alock1

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I know there's a Book thread, but I went back through some of the pages and noticed there seems to be a lot of posters who read Fantasy.

I couldn't help but feel like they got lost in all the other discussions though, and it would be good to have a separate place to discuss the genre.

Which series do you guys recommend? Who are your favourite authors?

And mostly, what do you look for in a Fantasy book. Is it epic world building or focused character building? Great detail or fast paced action. (not saying that these things are exclusive)

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I've read Lord of the Rings - loved it (of course) but I couldn't help feel like it hadn't been extremely well written in technical terms. A brilliant story told in a brilliant way, I loved the detail - but the use of language wasn't always great. Maybe it's because I read it from the age of 10, but I'm not sure I'd change my mind if I reread it now.

Harry Potter and Dark Materials series - great fantasy reads. I know that they're aimed at younger audiences too, but I still believe they hold a lot for adults. Great introduction for fantasy, but just because you've read epic fantasies like LOTR don't think that these books are below you without giving them a chance. Annoyingly, I say that, but can't help but warn you that the first 2 (maybe 3) Harry Potter do seem particularly more aimed towards children.

Kingkiller Chronicles - Patrick Rothfuss story of Kwothe in the books Name of The Wind and Wise Man's Fear - has become my favourite fantasy series. It hasn't ended yet, with the third book Doors of Stone rumoured to be released early 2014. It follows the story of Kwothe, a coming of age story which shows a boy with humble and dark beginnings becoming a notorious arcanist. I couldn't recommend this series more, it's a great story with a great character.

Just finished the first of the Nightangel Trilogy, by Brent Weeks. The Way of Shadows - it's a good read, one of the funnest books I've read. A pretty simple story, with some grit and reality that you don't often find in fantasy books (the ones I've read at least). Recommended again. Will be starting on the second as soon as I can get to the shops to buy it.

I've bought the first of the Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson. I hope it lives up to the hype.

Dresden Files - finished the first 3; very enjoyable, but for some reason I never care about reading the next one. I'm sure I'll finish them one day.

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I just wanted to add my thoughts on Song of Ice and Fire.. I've read Game of Thrones and Clash of Kings and I really don't understand the hype. I've seen the TV series and think it's incredible compared to any other fantasy TV we've seen, but I've never felt that on it's own merit it's anything particularly special. It's more that the medium of TV is behind when it comes to producing quality fantasy programs.
Anyway, I read the first two - and they're good, but not great. I thought it was very cliche, typical Medieval England style setting. The lack of magic or real fantasy annoyed me, and yet the parts I found most boring about the book were at 'The Wall' and the Supernatural things that lie behind the wall.
Some characters I really liked. Arya, Ned and Tyrion I enjoyed reading, but whenever I got to Sansa, Catelyn, Theon or Bran; I just wanted to put the book down. It was frustrating. The politics seemed well written, and I thought it was interesting to get the different view points of events from different angles - but sometimes it was coming from angles I couldn't give a shit about.
Mostly, my main issue was always the lack of fantasy. I want magic!

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It won't be long until I've finished Mistborn and Night Angel - what recommendations have you guys got for me? I've always wanted to try Wheel of Time or Riftwar Saga but the sheer amount of books in both I find really off putting.
 

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Now that's a well formatted post. I didn't read it, but it was pleasing to my eyes. Thank you.
 

Sir Matt

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Read The Black Company by Glenn Cook. It's fantastic. It's a gritty, dark fantasy book and series about a mercenary company(the Black Company, obviously) that gets hired to take part in a war. It's one of my favorite books. The portrayal of characters is realistic and engaging.

Also, Joe Abercrombie's The First Law series is very good. It's similar to the Black Company in terms of darkness. Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay is very good. One series that I find very entertaining, which is not necessarily the type fantasy you've mentioned, is the Monster Hunters International series by Larry Correia. It's not very serious in terms of tone or depth but is funny, entertaining.

It's SciFi but necessary reading for any Fantasy/SciFi nerd: Dune.
 

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My flatmate is reading The Wheel of Time, and says it's an epic. I haven't even had the courage to start reading it cause it's like 14 very thick books, and this guy finished them in 3 months. He literally did nothing else for 3 months except read them so I guess they must be pretty good. I myself last read Amulet of Samarkand and found it quite interesting.
 

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It won't be long until I've finished Mistborn and Night Angel - what recommendations have you guys got for me? I've always wanted to try Wheel of Time or Riftwar Saga but the sheer amount of books in both I find really off putting.
Mistborn is great, though the climax felt a bit cinematic to me. Wheel of Time is awesome and a must read. Not sure about the Riftwar Saga The first book The Magician (Apprentice & Master) are very good, but then the series drifts off...not to my satisfaction!

Farseer, liveship and tawny man trilogy by robin hobb. Very underrated, easily some of the best fantasy in recent times.
+ 1. I can personally attest for Farseer and Tawny Man series. Still have to start on Liveship.

There are some series which follow a different style to the usual style and my personal recommendations would be:

Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud (A saga filled with Djinns, Imps and Arifits with a wisecracking genie as hero)
Johannes Cabal by Jonathan L Howard (A story about a satirical necromancer wagers against the devil, goes to land of dreams and such). The first book Necromancer is on of the best ever!
Raven Series by James Barclay - This is inspired by the Black Company but stands tall on its own.
and if you like a India themed one, go for Shiva Trilogy by Amish.

Shannara by Terry Brooks and Magician by Trudi Canavan are also recommended!
 

Dracula

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I'm on book 9 of the wheel of time. First two books are very good but goes down hill until book 7 which is where it gets a pain to sludge through. The guy loves (loved) the sound of his own voice. .. or whatever that would be in literary terms. Too much inane description and tangents and too many ancillary characters-so much so you will be half way through a 45 page chapter where the character had done nothing but get out of bed and put clothes on... yet you have no idea who the character is because the last time he mentioned him was 2 books ago and they all have similar names!
Anyway, book 8 and 9 it gets better, just about worth it so far I think.

His Dark Materials is an excellent, excellent series.

EDIT: for the wheel of time, it's best to read the books all at once with little to no break inbetween books or you will miss the little nuances. I've not done that which is why I have difficulty with it i think
 

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Wouldn't be a huge fantasy fan, but I enjoyed Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles. The second book could've done with some editing, mind. It's too long.

Looking forward to the third book.
 

Alock1

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The first time I've ever been called a Nerd. It felt great.

Read The Black Company by Glenn Cook. It's fantastic. It's a gritty, dark fantasy book and series about a mercenary company(the Black Company, obviously) that gets hired to take part in a war. It's one of my favorite books. The portrayal of characters is realistic and engaging.

Also, Joe Abercrombie's The First Law series is very good. It's similar to the Black Company in terms of darkness. Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay is very good. One series that I find very entertaining, which is not necessarily the type fantasy you've mentioned, is the Monster Hunters International series by Larry Correia. It's not very serious in terms of tone or depth but is funny, entertaining.

It's SciFi but necessary reading for any Fantasy/SciFi nerd: Dune.
Thanks for the recommendations. I did actually pick up Dune after being told how groundbreaking it was and what not, I read a bit and could see how it influenced others. But I didn't get the sense that I should be reading it to see where other books have learnt from, but should simply go away and enjoy those books. I just wasn't pulled in, but I've done that with a few books and re-read them at a later date and enjoyed them immensely.

I actually picked up the First Law series when I was at the book store picking up Mistborn and Way of Shadows. Reading the blurb, I got the impression it was more character driven and full of grit and good combat scenes - it appealed to me, but I'd had lots of recommendations for Way of Shadows and wanted a more epic series to accompany it (Mistborn). It's definitely on my to-read list.

Tigana - just looked into it and it sounds really interesting. It's my sort of book for sure. I'll definitely be looking into this one.
The Black Company too seems like a good read. I hadn't heard of these two before, the first-person style of writing has appealed to me ever since Name of the Wind - I like to mix it up since and find time for some first-person reads.

Monster Hunters International sounds awesome. Just from the blurb it felt like what Omens was - Terry Practers humour with Neil Gaimans easy and fun to read use of language. Every so often you just need a light read, something different and more fun.

Thanks for the recommendations, I really appreciate it.
 

Alock1

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Farseer, liveship and tawny man trilogy by robin hobb. Very underrated, easily some of the best fantasy in recent times.
Farseer is the series which starts with Assassin's Apprentice right? I've been tempted to read these for quite some time, but until now I was never recommended it personally. I just found it when in the store and looking online. What's Robin Hobbs style of writing?

Wouldn't be a huge fantasy fan, but I enjoyed Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles. The second book could've done with some editing, mind. It's too long.

Looking forward to the third book.
It's awesome, isn't it? I loved it. It's actually what got me back into reading fantasy after a few years away from it. If you enjoyed Kingkiller, maybe you'd enjoy Blood Song by Anthony Ryan. Great reviews on both Amazon and Goodreads. He originally self-published but due to the success and good reviews, it was picked up by a publisher. It's not quite got a character as great and interesting as Kwothe, but I found myself getting attached to him just the same. It's in the same format as Kingkiller - with a Hero recounting his story to a chronicler, you're thrown into the Hero's head and retell his story with him. I definitely recommend it for all Rothfuss fans.

I'm on book 9 of the wheel of time. First two books are very good but goes down hill until book 7 which is where it gets a pain to sludge through. The guy loves (loved) the sound of his own voice. .. or whatever that would be in literary terms. Too much inane description and tangents and too many ancillary characters-so much so you will be half way through a 45 page chapter where the character had done nothing but get out of bed and put clothes on... yet you have no idea who the character is because the last time he mentioned him was 2 books ago and they all have similar names!
Anyway, book 8 and 9 it gets better, just about worth it so far I think.

His Dark Materials is an excellent, excellent series.

EDIT: for the wheel of time, it's best to read the books all at once with little to no break inbetween books or you will miss the little nuances. I've not done that which is why I have difficulty with it i think
My flatmate is reading The Wheel of Time, and says it's an epic. I haven't even had the courage to start reading it cause it's like 14 very thick books, and this guy finished them in 3 months. He literally did nothing else for 3 months except read them so I guess they must be pretty good. I myself last read Amulet of Samarkand and found it quite interesting.
Thanks for the info on Wheel of Time. You see, there are so many fantasy books out there which are calling to be read - do I have time to be reading a series that people say drags and that half the series isn't actually that great. I guess they all say that it's worth it in the end, but I'm not sure it's worth slugging it out with those. It would be nice to read them to say that I've read them, and understand what everybody loves so much. So maybe I'll give the first one a try one day, but once I find I'm struggling to find something else to read.

Mistborn is great, though the climax felt a bit cinematic to me. Wheel of Time is awesome and a must read. Not sure about the Riftwar Saga The first book The Magician (Apprentice & Master) are very good, but then the series drifts off...not to my satisfaction!



+ 1. I can personally attest for Farseer and Tawny Man series. Still have to start on Liveship.

There are some series which follow a different style to the usual style and my personal recommendations would be:

Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud (A saga filled with Djinns, Imps and Arifits with a wisecracking genie as hero)
Johannes Cabal by Jonathan L Howard (A story about a satirical necromancer wagers against the devil, goes to land of dreams and such). The first book Necromancer is on of the best ever!
Raven Series by James Barclay - This is inspired by the Black Company but stands tall on its own.
and if you like a India themed one, go for Shiva Trilogy by Amish.

Shannara by Terry Brooks and Magician by Trudi Canavan are also recommended!
Thanks, Farseer and Tawny Man are two books that I've been looking at for a while actually. I was just never recommended them personally and seemed to stumble across them. What's Robin Hobbs writing style, I read the blurb and it sounded interesting but sometimes with books you can tell about the author and the story a lot from the blurb. I think that Robin Hobb seems to use the blurb for what it should be, a brief 'about the book' whereas other authors I have liked have just used it to get across some interesting themes and spoilers which you want to know more about immediately.

So, Bartimaeus Trilogy has been recommended by both you and Bestie now - I looked it up and it sounds fun. After reading Harry Potter and King killer I definitely have more room for magical education and mischief. They're so easy to get lost in and enjoy without the hard work that some more epic fantasies take. Will definitely be looking into this at some point.

Johannes Cabal I actually have borrowed from a friend and had to return when I didn't read it due to reading 1984. It definitely seemed interesting, but 1984 was my 'break from traditional fantasy' book for that period of time, I didn't need another. I'll have to get it back from him to read soon, I just took a look at some of the reviews on Goodreads and it's promising stuff. I like the premise, that sold me when my friend first told me about it because it's not usually something I would read, but for no reason than I've never gone out of my way to look for one.

I'm not sold on the Raven Series, but really interested in the Shiva Trilogy. A radical interpretation on the life of Lord Shiva, admittedly I know little about the original story but know of it and I'm really interested in reading a story where a God is humanized and questioned for it's(their) faults. It has that feel that one day a movie will be made out of it as it reaches more and more people.

Thanks again for the recommendations.
 

Nighteyes

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Pretty much agree with everything in the OP.

LOTR is my personal favourite and like you read it a long time back as well. My opinion might change if I read the books again but at the time I felt some parts in the book were too dragged on but as I said I was an impatient kid when I read the book.

Harry Potter is great and while I think it was intended for younger audiences there are plenty of adults who have read it and enjoyed it. Great set of books and well written. The movies are crap though.

Haven't read A Song of Ice and Fire yet, plan to read it next month. And you're right the number of books for Wheel of Time is off putting even if the reviews for the books have generally been great.

Kingfiller Chronicles seems interesting so thanks for the recommendation.
 

kps88

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Not what the OP asked for, but can people suggest some good Scifi reads? Really enjoyed Dune, haven't read much Scifi after that though.
 

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Not what the OP asked for, but can people suggest some good Scifi reads? Really enjoyed Dune, haven't read much Scifi after that though.

Ender's Game is another almost "must read" SciFi book. Hitchhiker's Guide, obviously. The next SciFi I plan to read is Hyperion by Dan Simmons.
 

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I would recommend the Bartimaeus Trilogy also.

The Power of Five Series - Okay, i was around 13 when the first book came out but i loved it. The last book came out in 2012 when i was 18 but i still thoroughly enjoyed it and it was a fantastic conclusion to a story which had me gripped from beginning to end. There is Magic/Powers and each book is based around a character. The third being based around 2 characters as they are twins. The fifth book concerns each character.
 

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It's awesome, isn't it? I loved it. It's actually what got me back into reading fantasy after a few years away from it. If you enjoyed Kingkiller, maybe you'd enjoy Blood Song by Anthony Ryan. Great reviews on both Amazon and Goodreads. He originally self-published but due to the success and good reviews, it was picked up by a publisher. It's not quite got a character as great and interesting as Kwothe, but I found myself getting attached to him just the same. It's in the same format as Kingkiller - with a Hero recounting his story to a chronicler, you're thrown into the Hero's head and retell his story with him. I definitely recommend it for all Rothfuss fans.
Thanks, I'll keep an eye out for that.

Not what the OP asked for, but can people suggest some good Scifi reads? Really enjoyed Dune, haven't read much Scifi after that though.

I love some of China Mielville's stuff.

You could start with the Bas-Lag trilogy. The first book in it is Perdido Street Station, so see how you get on with that & if you like it there's The Scar and Iron Council to follow.

Couldn't recommend Mieville highly enough.
 

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The Eternal Champion series books, best being Elric of Melnibone' and Stormbringer by Michael Moorcock is a great fast read. Theme being the struggle between Law and Chaos. Written in the 60s/ 70s
 

paceme

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In response to the op, Hobbs style is very character driven. It's all in first person (liveship included which didn't have only one narrator like farseer and tawny man) it moves fast in general with plenty of action but never to the detriment of Fitz's development.

I must have read them about ten times, there's something really gripping about them and the relationships between characters is fantastic. I won't spoil anything for you but they are my favourite books of all time, in any genre.
 

Alock1

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I was wondering, with Game of Thrones being highly successful, do we think there could be an influx of TV adaptations of fantasy books? Or perhaps the success of GOT could also have an effect on more fantasy series being picked up for movies with more and more confirmation that the market is there for it.

Syfy tried to make Dresden Files but canceled after one season - I've seen a few episodes, I thought that it was pretty decent but lacked a big enough budget.

Way of Shadows is good read, but I think it'd be far more suited to a film than a TV series. Any TV series would become procedural 'assassination of the week' sort of thing.

Name of the Wind? It'd be difficult, as what is great about the story is the narration of Kwothe. We could have him narrating in a Dexter style way I suppose, giving his thoughts on what had happened and setting the scene while retelling his story. Is there enough content to work with?

Mistborn? Haven't read it yet, but apparently it's being considered (or has been)

http://fantasy-faction.com/2012/mistborn-movie-trailer (watch below)

 

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Perdido Street Station is an amazing read written by China Mieville. He describes his world in ridiculously excessive detail which might throw you off at first but grows on you as the world interests more and more. Incredibly dark ideation throughout. Would definitely recommend it!
 

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If you've read The Fellowship of the Ring then you've read the first book of the Wheel of Time.
 

Alock1

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So, I'm halfway through the first Mistborn. It's fecking awesome.
 

Count Orduck

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I wasn't keen on Mistborn. Didn't like Sanderson's writing style. It was too... American.
 

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I wasn't keen on Mistborn. Didn't like Sanderson's writing style. It was too... American.
I quite like sanderson's writing style, one of my favourite current authors. Though he does suffer a bit with his over the top battles at times that keep using the magic/powers in new random ways for the character to survive. At times it feels like he is just trying to top the last one. But if you just sort of accept it, the stories are still good.
 

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Wouldn't be a huge fantasy fan, but I enjoyed Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles. The second book could've done with some editing, mind. It's too long.

Looking forward to the third book.
That was a great book, really hooks you in. I was really disappoint when I finished it only to find out I was going to have to wait ages before the next one. Though seems at the moment every author/series I've read is just sitting there waiting for the next book to be published. One major downside to these types of books, they never seem to end
 

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Some great series mentioned already, I have Wheel of Time on my to read list and I am about to read the Malazan Book of the Fallen series if I can find a definitive reading order for it, have been doing some searching on Google and its doing my head in as there seems to be quite a debate on what the proper order should be. I would heartily recommend Stephen R Donaldson's 'Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever' there are already 9 books in the series and the final book is due to be released in October.
 

Alock1

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Finished The Wise Man's Fear, second book on The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss.

While I don't think that the book is the same quality as it's predecessor (The Name of The Wind) it is still a very good book and an enjoyable reading (for the most part). I hated the parts of the book when Kvothe was chasing the bandits, but I liked the other parts. Didn't felt that well about how Kvothe was treated in the end by Maer Alveron but that's life and in the end Kvothe still got a lot of money. The most enjoyable parts of the book - undoubtedly for me - were the parts when he was with Denna. One of the most deep and complex relationships I have ever seen, anywhere. I liked also his dialogues with Devi, the parts when he was at the university but also the new parts like when he was at Heart and into Fae Relm were enjoyable, but still the part with Denna were by far the best in the book.

Now waiting for Rothfuss to finish the third book. I don't know how he will set all the things in a single novel (killing a king, kidnapping a princess, talking with God, ruining the world, learning a language in a single day, becoming the most powerful wizard in Earth etc) and also I hope that there is a conclusion in the main story and finally we understand why Kvothe became Kote and I would also love to see a conclusion to other things that I don't expect to be in his chronicles, especially his relationship with Denna (Bast apparently knows her) and the ultimate fight against Chandrian (which seems that haven't happened to this point). I guess that The Door's of Stone will finish the chronicles but we will see at-least another book with Kvothe in present. Finishing this entirely only by telling the story, and leaving Kvothe just continue working as an ordinary innkeeper wouldn't be right and will make me hate Rothfuss with a passion.

And I almost forgot, Elodin is amazing. And liked how Kvothe got totally destroyed in fights by woman, be it in mind fight against Devi or in actual fight against Vashet or Carceret.
I agree that Wise Man's Fear was not quite at the level of Name of The Wind but it was still a great read for sure. I love the two, and if the series continues strongly it could easily be my favourite fantasy series of all time.

Yeah, there is definitely plenty to conclude after the third day takes place of story telling. That concerns me about the third book, will the third day of story telling be rushed, choppy and not satisfactory - just so there is space for Rothfuss to give us a conclusion to Kwothe. Or, will it end with plenty left to question? Either way, it's a concern - really, I was hoping he'd have come out by now and said that he may need to extend it beyond 3 books.

I started reading it the 11th. I've been reading slowly to enjoy it. So far, it's fantastic.
Where abouts are you in the book Sir Matt? I can't imagine you could read this story slowly after the first 60 or so pages, but maybe you have a busy life. Or just have far better self-control than I do.
 

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I agree that Wise Man's Fear was not quite at the level of Name of The Wind but it was still a great read for sure. I love the two, and if the series continues strongly it could easily be my favourite fantasy series of all time.

Yeah, there is definitely plenty to conclude after the third day takes place of story telling. That concerns me about the third book, will the third day of story telling be rushed, choppy and not satisfactory - just so there is space for Rothfuss to give us a conclusion to Kwothe. Or, will it end with plenty left to question? Either way, it's a concern - really, I was hoping he'd have come out by now and said that he may need to extend it beyond 3 books.
Have you read A song of ice and fire? Except the complicated awkward Kvothe-Denna relationship, it is superior in any other way to Kingkiller. But still Kingkiller chronicle is really good.

A big concern really. I think that Rothfuss said that this is only one of the stories for that world, and he has a lot of other stories. Hopefully a trilogy with Kvothe at present.

Who is Master Ash? I think that it's either Cinder or Bredon.
Why Kvothe sucks? Because he changed his name to Kote, or something more complex like perhaps hiding his name on that box which he cannot open anymore
Auri could be the moon.
Meluan Lackless must be Kvothe's aunt.

Edit: Just seen the OP about ASOIAF. Meh, you're wrong.
 

Alock1

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Have you read A song of ice and fire? Except the complicated awkward Kvothe-Denna relationship, it is superior in any other way to Kingkiller. But still Kingkiller chronicle is really good.

A big concern really. I think that Rothfuss said that this is only one of the stories for that world, and he has a lot of other stories. Hopefully a trilogy with Kvothe at present.

Who is Master Ash? I think that it's either Cinder or Bredon.
Why Kvothe sucks? Because he changed his name to Kote, or something more complex like perhaps hiding his name on that box which he cannot open anymore
Auri could be the moon.
Meluan Lackless must be Kvothe's aunt.

Edit: Just seen the OP about ASOIAF. Meh, you're wrong.
Don't get me wrong, it's an interest concept, it's well written, he particularly does justice to the politics and vast array of characters.

But I just wish I didn't have to read some characters stories, and my biggest gripe is that there is little fantasy.

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The 3rd book is titled 'The Doors of Stone' - immediately you think back to the Archives stone building, with the big brass stone wall which is out of bounds and he wants desperately to get through. It seems the most sensible, but I'm not quite sure this is what it is referring to.

In Skarpi's story about Lanre, it says 'the enemy was set beyond the doors of stone' - is this referring to death? He discusses having doors inside the mind, one door is that of death. He has parts/areas/doors of his mind which he uses to seperate things, right? Is the door of death a place where you forget and can never retrieve? Has he put the secrets to his name (and power) behind the doors of death inside his mind?

That is quite an interesting theory, Auri being the moon for sure. I hadn't thought of that, I'm going to have to consider it some more before getting back to you. However, I do have a seperate theory I'll run past you.. I wondered if Auri was infact Princess Aries who he tells Chronicler he can tell her truth about, the princess that he 'rescued from burrow Kings'?
Another, more 'easy-fit' theory is that she is the girl who disappeared when Ambrose engaged. I credit my friend with this theory, I'm not sure about - it's plausible enough for sure.

Yeah, Lackless is definitely Kvothe's aunt - she talks about her sister being taken by Edema Ruh, and in the first part of the book when Kwothe is signing the rhyme about 'Lady Lackless' his Mother gets offended and questions the rhyme.

I was under the impression for a long time that Cinder was Master Ash too. However, upon reading the books for a second time, I also started to suspect Bredon more and more - he definitely has a part to play in this story, and I'm sure that once we find out who he is, then it will become apparent that Bredon was treating the saga just like a game of [insert game, shit sorry].

There's plenty more to discuss, but I feel like I'd be taking away from possible enjoyment incase you decide to read the books again. I came to lots of new conclusions and my theories developed a lot more second time round.

Oh, something that I don't think we gain any clues for except given at the beginning - will we see Ben again? I'm sure when he leaves Kwothe says something like 'I knew it'd be a very long time before we saw eachother again' - something like that anyway, by 'long time' - did he mean 'forever'? I was sure we'd see Ben again in the second book, was disappointed that we didn't.

I doubt Ben could be Master Ash. But I guess anything is possible.
 

Revan

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Don't get me wrong, it's an interest concept, it's well written, he particularly does justice to the politics and vast array of characters.

But I just wish I didn't have to read some characters stories, and my biggest gripe is that there is little fantasy.

--

The 3rd book is titled 'The Doors of Stone' - immediately you think back to the Archives stone building, with the big brass stone wall which is out of bounds and he wants desperately to get through. It seems the most sensible, but I'm not quite sure this is what it is referring to.

In Skarpi's story about Lanre, it says 'the enemy was set beyond the doors of stone' - is this referring to death? He discusses having doors inside the mind, one door is that of death. He has parts/areas/doors of his mind which he uses to seperate things, right? Is the door of death a place where you forget and can never retrieve? Has he put the secrets to his name (and power) behind the doors of death inside his mind?

That is quite an interesting theory, Auri being the moon for sure. I hadn't thought of that, I'm going to have to consider it some more before getting back to you. However, I do have a seperate theory I'll run past you.. I wondered if Auri was infact Princess Aries who he tells Chronicler he can tell her truth about, the princess that he 'rescued from burrow Kings'?
Another, more 'easy-fit' theory is that she is the girl who disappeared when Ambrose engaged. I credit my friend with this theory, I'm not sure about - it's plausible enough for sure.

Yeah, Lackless is definitely Kvothe's aunt - she talks about her sister being taken by Edema Ruh, and in the first part of the book when Kwothe is signing the rhyme about 'Lady Lackless' his Mother gets offended and questions the rhyme.

I was under the impression for a long time that Cinder was Master Ash too. However, upon reading the books for a second time, I also started to suspect Bredon more and more - he definitely has a part to play in this story, and I'm sure that once we find out who he is, then it will become apparent that Bredon was treating the saga just like a game of [insert game, shit sorry].

There's plenty more to discuss, but I feel like I'd be taking away from possible enjoyment incase you decide to read the books again. I came to lots of new conclusions and my theories developed a lot more second time round.

Oh, something that I don't think we gain any clues for except given at the beginning - will we see Ben again? I'm sure when he leaves Kwothe says something like 'I knew it'd be a very long time before we saw eachother again' - something like that anyway, by 'long time' - did he mean 'forever'? I was sure we'd see Ben again in the second book, was disappointed that we didn't.

I doubt Ben could be Master Ash. But I guess anything is possible.
We can discuss anything you want here, I don't think that I am going to make a re-read. At-least not for a long time.

Auri being princess Aries? It could be, after all Kvothe has to rescue a princess and he didn't, so we'll see. Auri also knows about Amyr, it will be very interesting to see how she knows about it. Same about Alveron, but at-least there it could be as he said, he studied them. But Auri is more mysterious.

Did Felurian said that Amyr were before the humans (or it is my imagination)?

Cthaeh was magnificient. Could it be that it was the God Kvothe referred that he had talked to. Will Kvothe, Bast and the chronicle be in danger because he has talk with Cthaeh while the other two knows about it.

Master Ash must be someone important. In the chapter when Kvothe kills the dragon, I think that they mentioned the damage by it with 'ash and cinder' words. It's not much but I doubt it was a coincidence. Cinder should be a strong favorite with it, but also Bredon could be.

Ben, I have forgotten about him. I think that Kvothe said that they won't see for a long time, not forever. He should play a part in the next book.

The death door theory, interesting. Haven't read about it before.

Ambrose. Is he the king Kvothe will kill? Or perhaps kill another king which then will be succeeded by Ambrose which would be even worse. Kvothe starting a war and ruining the world, how.

Chandrian! They are alive in the moment Kvothe and Chronicle are writing his story. There must be a final confrontation after. Cvaeth said that it was twice in a lifetime chance to meet Cinder. Was he refereeing the previous meting or is he implying that they'll meet again.

And finally, after why Kvothe sucks mystery the other part I want to know most is how his relation with Denna will conclude. They weren't in the best terms in the end. One of my thoughts was that he was somehow let down (betrayed) by her so from pain he decided to completely change. I have seen a lot of people hate her, but for me their relationship is the best part of the books. Did you noticed how many times they spoke in rhymes?
 

Edgar Allan Pillow

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Not what the OP asked for, but can people suggest some good Scifi reads? Really enjoyed Dune, haven't read much Scifi after that though.
Foundation series by Asimov, Ender series is good too, but a bit OTT with kids ruling the world and such, but I still enjoyed Enders game & Enders shadow.

Ender's Game is another almost "must read" SciFi book. Hitchhiker's Guide, obviously. The next SciFi I plan to read is Hyperion by Dan Simmons.
Let me know how Hyperion goes. Have started it a couple of times, but lost interest halfway through the fisrt chapter both times.
 

onesaf

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Read the Night Angel trilogy by Brent Weeks recently and thought it was a very good series with great characters, first book The Way of Shadows was the best of the series in my opinion. I do intend to read Steve Erikson's Malazan series very soon.
 

Kristjan

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A classic that I haven't seen mentioned here is The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny.
Would recommend that, one of my all time favourites, especially the first half.

Dan Simmon's Hyperion series is good as well.
 

King_Eric

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It won't be long until I've finished Mistborn and Night Angel - what recommendations have you guys got for me? I've always wanted to try Wheel of Time or Riftwar Saga but the sheer amount of books in both I find really off putting.
The Feist books read like a train. Especially the first ones are great. You definately have to read them. You'll finish the first few series in no time anyway.
After the first ten or so books, I found the quality of the books going down a bit. I'm not even sure if I'll read the last three books. The whole series officially ended now.

The Jordan series is different. Very large volumes and everything goes much slower than with Feist. He's much more descriptive. Personally, I like them a lot mainly because of the world he created. It's not the typical humans/elves/dwarves/etc world but something completely unique. Probably the best world-builder I've read so far (well, together with Tolkien of course).

Which series do you guys recommend? Who are your favourite authors?
Besides Tolkien, Jordan, Feist and Martin which you've already mentioned, I recently read two great books from Markus Heitz (Ritus and Sanctum). The books are based on the French legend of the beast of the Gevaudan. You follow two main characters, one in the 17th or so century and one in the present day world. Throughout the books, you learn how both storylines are connected. It was a great read. Also read his series 'The Dwarves' but those were less impressive, though certainly not bad.
 

Snowle Gunnar Solskjær

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I'm a big fan of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels. He draws up some fantastic characters in a world that is ridiculous yet logical, with some fantastic humour. Well worth a read.
 

Count Orduck

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Don't read Wheel of Time unless you want an experience akin to slowly scooping your brains out of your ears with a rusty spoon. Every line makes you stupider.
 

duffer

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Not really "high fantasy" but The Night Watch (and a few of its sequels) is an interesting read, here's what wiki says about it...
In the story's worldline there exists a magical realm beneath the surface of all things—referred to as the Twilight (or Gloom in other translations). The action in the novel centers on a group of people referred to as the Others—human beings who tapped into the Twilight and gained supernormal abilities. The Others were the humans (shamans, soothsayers, and wisemen) from long ago who figured out how to step into the Twilight. However, the Others are different from humans, they are born as Others. Humans are not able (at least in the first part of the tetralogy) to become Others. The Twilight does not offer its gifts freely; it feeds off the strength of those Others who enter it. If sufficiently weakened, they are consumed, never to return to the ordinary world. The aura of any Other, or emotional state at the time of their first entry into the Twilight, determines whether or not the Other will become a 'Light' or 'Dark' Other. Furthermore, once determined either Light or Dark, an Other must choose what specific powers they will borrow from the Twilight. Variations such as vampires, magicians, and healers are all possible, each with their own benefits and restrictions. Often, the choice is made by the state of mind but if choosing Light or Dark during Initiation, a Watch can attempt to steer the powers of someone into what they need at the time. "Initiation" refers to the process of an Other choosing not Light or Dark but choosing to officially be a part of the Night Watch (Light Others) or Day Watch (Dark Others). An Other can exist without being initiated as part of a Watch, still independently capable of entering the Twilight and becoming Light or Dark. The choice of becoming light or dark, even what specific powers you gain is usually final.
The division of Light and Dark had always existed between the Others. Those of the Light believed it was their duty to help the weak and the helpless. Those of the Dark shunned all obligations. They did what they wanted, regardless of morals and consequences. For many millennia, the two sides fought a vicious battle. Both were willing to use any means necessary to achieve victory. Eventually they realized that if they continued their battle, neither side would survive. The leaders of both sides forged the Grand Treaty—a set of laws to govern the way the Others used their powers. The Light Others created the Night Watch, the Dark Others the Day Watch, to ensure that neither side would violate the Treaty. The Inquisition, a group composed of both Dark and Light Others, was created to arbitrate.
If they spend them too quickly, the Others can use the feelings and emotions of the humans surrounding them to recharge their powers. The Dark Others use negative emotions such as pain or anger, the Light Others use positive emotions such as joy. Feeding on pain causes pain to increase, feeding on joy causes joy to wane. Because negative emotions are much easier to achieve in humans, this arrangement creates a situation where the powers of the Dark Others are easier to recharge and are much more readily available than those of the Light Others.
Since the signing of the Treaty, the Night Watch and the Day Watch have kept their eyes on each other, diligently policing every violation. The old leaders continue to plot, using humanity and the Others as their pawns. Only time will tell which side will prevail.
 

Sir Matt

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I agree that Wise Man's Fear was not quite at the level of Name of The Wind but it was still a great read for sure. I love the two, and if the series continues strongly it could easily be my favourite fantasy series of all time.

Yeah, there is definitely plenty to conclude after the third day takes place of story telling. That concerns me about the third book, will the third day of story telling be rushed, choppy and not satisfactory - just so there is space for Rothfuss to give us a conclusion to Kwothe. Or, will it end with plenty left to question? Either way, it's a concern - really, I was hoping he'd have come out by now and said that he may need to extend it beyond 3 books.



Where abouts are you in the book Sir Matt? I can't imagine you could read this story slowly after the first 60 or so pages, but maybe you have a busy life. Or just have far better self-control than I do.

He's in Tarbean at the moment. I've been working a lot and had a friend's wedding to attend this weekend so I've been very busy.