Has political correctness actually gone mad?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Pogue Mahone, May 13, 2015.

  1. May 13, 2015
    #1

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    The phrase alluded to in the title always used to wind me up. Political correctness is a good thing and comes as a result of a decades long struggle for equality. Who cares if we sometimes err on the side of being too cautious about causing offence?

    Reading articles like this, though, makes me wonder if it really has gone a bit too far. Especially with social media empowering loony tunes crusades by anyone, anywhere, who takes offence at anything.

    Thoughts?
  2. May 13, 2015
    #2

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    Today's youth are delicate flowers, Pogue. We can't expose them to the harsh realities of human existence lest they shrink and wilt like violets.
  3. May 13, 2015
    #3

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
  4. May 13, 2015
    #4

    rcoobc Not as crap as eferyone thinks

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    Messages:
    39,147
    Location:
    C-137
    Supports:
    Free Speech
    I think anti-political correctness has gone mad.

    Or not gone mad, is mad. Is angry.

    There are so many causes in front of our eyes now (open Facebook or Google news and you'll see people who are offended by something), and it seems to annoy the anti-pc brigade no end.

    In reality, the world has just shrunk. You can be offended by something in California whilst sitting in a chair in devon
  5. May 13, 2015
    #5

    DiseaseOfTheAge wants Amber Rudd to call him a naughty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    17,378
    I've had to skip entire sections of my course due to triggering issues of a different nature, so I can understand not being able to cope with certain material but I think it's very much the student's problem. I don't think a trigger warning would do any harm for something like that but I don't think you can make other allowances sensibly.

    Anyway, nah... political correctness has a good way to go yet before 'mad' examples are particularly common.
  6. May 13, 2015
    #6

    Mrs Smoker Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    23,946
    Location:
    In garden with Maurice
    Supports:
    Panthère du Ndé
    Today's youth, tomorrow's leaders. Oh my.
  7. May 13, 2015
    #7

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    Jazz hands... :lol:

    Can't be real.
  8. May 13, 2015
    #8

    Eboue nasty little twerp with crazy bitter-man opinions

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53,683
    Location:
    Hillary Clinton has been my friend for a decade
    Supports:
    Arsenal
    Jazz hands...for fecks sake
  9. May 13, 2015
    #9

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    That's my take on it too.

    This whole "triggering" thing seems like a really new phenomenon. I worked in mental health at one point and don't even remember this being on our radar at the time. Phobias were a big deal but the consensus was that avoiding them only reinforced the issues and people should be encouraged to challenge their phobias wherever possible. I don't really understand how people can put trauma behind them if they constantly strive to avoid being reminded of it?
  10. May 13, 2015
    #10

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    [​IMG]

    Actual tweet.
  11. May 13, 2015
    #11

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    :houllier: Wtf is a feminist jazz hand?
  12. May 13, 2015
    #12

    Siorac Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    15,523
    Location:
    16th century
    What the feck is jazz hands?
  13. May 13, 2015
    #13

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    I'd tell you but I hate jazz and don't want to trigger myself.
  14. May 13, 2015
    #14

    Eboue nasty little twerp with crazy bitter-man opinions

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53,683
    Location:
    Hillary Clinton has been my friend for a decade
    Supports:
    Arsenal
    The maddest thing in this thread.
  15. May 13, 2015
    #15

    Snowle Gunnar Solskjær Enjoys hatching eggs for people Staff

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    28,316
    Location:
    Lake Athabasca
    I've had my own issues and for me there certainly reached a point where I had to just face up to the issues rather than shy away from them.

    My girlfriend went through something awful when she was younger and has ended up doing a whole project on it. There have been some difficult times during but she's glad she ended up doing that instead of shying away from what happened.

    I know everyone is different but I'm a fan of confronting your issues.
  16. May 13, 2015
    #16

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    Certainly seems like the most sensible approach. Anyway, I'm not even suggesting everyone needs to really immerse themselves in past trauma, just try and be a little less precious around stuff that might, indirectly, remind them of it. Coming back to phobias, the most effective techniques involve gradual exposure to very watered down versions of whatever they're phobic about. Someone who has a phobia about spiders might start by imagining a spider, then progressing through looking at and touching cartoonish drawings, realistic drawings, unrealistic models, realistic models and so on all the way to an actual spider. Being regularly exposed to stuff which might trigger unpleasant memories would seem like a sensible first step on this path. Going out of your way to ever encounter any triggers just seems really unhelpful to the individual concerned,
  17. May 13, 2015
    #17

    Siorac Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    15,523
    Location:
    16th century
    I think most mental health experts are, too, though I'm not one of them. But it makes perfect sense: shying away from them, trying to bury them carries the risk of these issues resurfacing at the worst possible times.
  18. May 13, 2015
    #18

    DiseaseOfTheAge wants Amber Rudd to call him a naughty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    17,378
    From personal experience, my feeling is that challenging phobias is absolutely what helps me but only when the situation is right. Taking the issue head on is very rewarding when I'm prepared for it and have a reasonably positive mindset but often sets me back quite a bit when it's unexpected and I'm not in the best frame of mind.
  19. May 13, 2015
    #19

    Pogue Mahone Poster of the year 2008

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    99,923
    Location:
    "like a man in silk pyjamas shooting pigeons
    Good point.
  20. May 13, 2015
    #20

    evra Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    10,859
    Location:
    Bitten by an adder as a baby, the adder died.
    I think it's way out of hand, at its worst it stops us confronting very serious issues. The best example I can think of is the awful situation in Rotherham.
  21. May 13, 2015
    #21

    SteveJ all-round nice guy, aka Uncle Joe Kardashian Scout

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    58,094
    Location:
    Bigmouth Strikes Again
    Exactly the kind of clumsy, convenient generalisation that led to the advent of political correctness in the first place.
  22. May 13, 2015
    #22

    JUPITER New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    1,711
    I know, imagine a world with leaders who are highly sensitive toward the human condition and want to prevent situations that are distressing for others!

    The flip-side to this could actually be that we'll be looked back upon as the last generation who took no offense to anything, passively sat by and allowed ruling classes to create and manipulate wars, did nothing as systemic abuse was brushed under the carpet in front of our eyes with an ongoing mantra of 'that's just the way it is'.

    I like the idea of a generation coming up who are 'overly' sensitive to anything that is potentially upsetting to other members of our society, even if I sometimes roll my eyes at it.
  23. May 13, 2015
    #23

    Nick 0208 Ldn News 24

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    23,722


  24. May 13, 2015
    #24

    jeff_goldblum Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    2,636
    Location:
    Durham
    Being 'politically correct' is a million times better than what we had before. If you find your ability to have fun or laugh considerably constrained by the need not to hurt or offend people it's you that's the problem, not society. A better term for 'being politically correct' would be 'being considerate' or 'not being an arsehole'
  25. May 13, 2015
    #25

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    It will be the end for the west. Other nations will roll over us as our overly sensitive leaders cry into their herbal tea, sputtering on about feelings and sensibilities.
  26. May 13, 2015
    #26

    LeChuck CE Specialist

    If you watch Fawlty Towers and feel offended, you need to chill out.

    If you watch Fawlty Towers and you laugh, you need to be more considerate.
  27. May 13, 2015
    #27

    Mrs Smoker Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    23,946
    Location:
    In garden with Maurice
    Supports:
    Panthère du Ndé
    We'll all be speaking Russi...Chin...Korean in 20 years.
  28. May 13, 2015
    #28

    Flying_Heckfish Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,895
    Location:
    Hand in Glove
    People love to complain
  29. May 13, 2015
    #29

    SteveJ all-round nice guy, aka Uncle Joe Kardashian Scout

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    58,094
    Location:
    Bigmouth Strikes Again
    Where are all these masses of people whose lives have (supposedly) been marred by the 'plague of political correctness', Feminism etc etc? Have to say, none of these things have made any negative difference whatsoever to my life, yet all the time I read of people complaining about PC & the like.
  30. May 13, 2015
    #30

    Bill.s.preston Fluffybunnykins - needs to bulk up (with cake!)

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Messages:
    23,552
    Location:
    wouldst thou like to live deliciously?
    Nothing wrong with political correctness in general, but I sometimes get the impression that certain people go out of their way to be offended at the slightest thing and use it to their advantage, or to push their own agendas. This is why we can't have nice things :(

    You also get situations where people seemingly hide behind worthwhile causes despite being misguided and potentially bigoted and ruin potentially good work. Like the woman that looks like Noel Fielding from Goldsmiths University who hosted an equality event on the proviso that you're not white and/or male.
    She explained that she can't be a racist though, because she's from an ethnic minority background :houllier:

    http://www.standard.co.uk/news/lond...use-im-an-ethnic-minority-woman-10243202.html
  31. May 13, 2015
    #31

    JUPITER New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    1,711
    Other nations? I think this will happen globally.

    The whole world will produce a generation more concerned with easing others' suffering than they are with self-status at the expense of others.

    Such traits will be looked back on with the same embarrassment and horror that we feel when we look back on slavery, not allowing women to vote etc.

    Of course, this will be gradual, but it's an inevitable evolution.
  32. May 13, 2015
    #32

    Nobby style Full Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    6,084
    Location:
    Tooting Colombia to Tooting Bec
    I love it most of the time.

    .
  33. May 13, 2015
    #33

    Archie Leach Gooner

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2012
    Messages:
    8,966
    Location:
    Hollywood Upstairs Medical College
    Supports:
    Arsenal
    I can't be bothered reading the article but in Australia, for instance, 'jazz hands' or what appears to be that, is the sign language equivalent of clapping.

    But that's because deaf people can't hear clapping.
  34. May 13, 2015
    #34

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    China won't, I doubt that India will, either. Their perceived lack of sensitivity is down to having a billion citizens, people are quite expendable to their governments, and always will be. And all of those Middle Eastern nations we've bombed into the bronze age will relish the opportunity for revenge.

    And then there's Israel, who will keep on keeping on. Not to mention Russia, who never eschew an opportunity for Slavic aggrandizement.

    It will be western Europe, Canada and the US who might go the way you suggest. Doing so will mean the end of our supremacy and a steep and unpleasant decline in our living standards. Life on earth is a game in which nice guys go extinct.
  35. May 13, 2015
    #35

    Mrs Smoker Full Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    23,946
    Location:
    In garden with Maurice
    Supports:
    Panthère du Ndé
    A bit weird, wouldn't actual clapping be as visually helpful to imagine 'clapping' as jazz hands or even better? Plus, great for blind too.
  36. May 13, 2015
    #36

    Dwazza Gunnar Solskjær Lutefisk is it!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    75,336
    Location:
    il pentimento
    Supports:
    Moanchester United
    Hehehe. We're an evil bunch here in Canada.
  37. May 13, 2015
    #37

    Archie Leach Gooner

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2012
    Messages:
    8,966
    Location:
    Hollywood Upstairs Medical College
    Supports:
    Arsenal
    I'd say it's more obvious visually than actual clapping.
  38. May 13, 2015
    #38

    JUPITER New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    1,711
    You're talking about the world as it is and has been - and I agree with you.

    I'm talking about how it will be.
  39. May 13, 2015
    #39

    Nick 0208 Ldn News 24

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    23,722
    So a deaf person is going to need a trigger warning just before they start feminist jazz handing, otherwise he or she might suspect them of taking the piss? That the NUS could be so damned inconsiderate...
    Last edited: May 13, 2015
  40. May 13, 2015
    #40

    Grinner Fat gutted, hairy shouldered, stinky Arse. Staff

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    65,083
    Location:
    I love free dirt and rocks!
    Supports:
    Arsenal
    I've been looking for a reason to post this...