Ole the man manager

Foxbatt

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Now he should learn how to manage the fans. Managing the fans during the match is as important as managing the players.
Eventually he is going to get that too.
 

sugar_kane

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I still find it astonishing that this thread needed starting, of all the things to criticise Ole for his man management isn't it.

If he can build on his natural ability for man management (which is not something you can really learn - see Jose Mourinho) he can be a successful manager, for me - I think he is smart enough to figure out the formula for success, and benefits from being quite a calm person who is quietly going about building something.

He just needs to make sure he has the right players, and the right coaches around him - as do all successful managers.
 

Semper Fudge

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Now he should learn how to manage the fans. Managing the fans during the match is as important as managing the players.
Eventually he is going to get that too.
1. This doesn't make any sense.
2. Even if it did...it's obviously not as important, is it?
 

Spaghetti

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What's shocking to me is that there's such a thing as man manager when the word manager alone already means "the person who supervises/controls/manages a group of people". So what does "man manager" mean? the person who manages a group of people of man? that's sexist to be honest.
A manager usually controls a group of people. A man manager excels with the personal, individual touch.
 

Isotope

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Ole Ole Ole
Thought some of you might appreciate this. The boss doing some coaching in pre-season. Insert something about him being bad at it underneath...
looks like some just ignoring him?
 

tomaldinho1

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I still find it astonishing that this thread needed starting, of all the things to criticise Ole for his man management isn't it.

If he can build on his natural ability for man management (which is not something you can really learn - see Jose Mourinho) he can be a successful manager, for me - I think he is smart enough to figure out the formula for success, and benefits from being quite a calm person who is quietly going about building something.

He just needs to make sure he has the right players, and the right coaches around him - as do all successful managers.
One of the greatest man managers of all time? Mourinho has become a bitter old man now and really slipped into mediocrity but let's not rewrite history; his greatest strength (and he is one of the greatest managers of all time) during his peak years was managing his squad as a whole and individually.

Ole's approach seems to be a lot more focused around happy players equalling a happy squad and that delivering better results. If you are being critical, so far, you have to say it's not really worked because we've yet to win anything and have lost some very winnable finals/semis. If you are thinking positively and longer term, hopefully this is the season where we start to see the fruits of his more 'buddy buddy' approach (no I'm not saying he's too nice but he's definitely more of an arm around a player type manager than Mou who calls people out) because football has moved on so much that I feel you have to accept player power and pander to the team/individuals a lot more than you used to.
 

justsomebloke

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One of the greatest man managers of all time? Mourinho has become a bitter old man now and really slipped into mediocrity but let's not rewrite history; his greatest strength (and he is one of the greatest managers of all time) during his peak years was managing his squad as a whole and individually.

Ole's approach seems to be a lot more focused around happy players equalling a happy squad and that delivering better results. If you are being critical, so far, you have to say it's not really worked because we've yet to win anything and have lost some very winnable finals/semis. If you are thinking positively and longer term, hopefully this is the season where we start to see the fruits of his more 'buddy buddy' approach (no I'm not saying he's too nice but he's definitely more of an arm around a player type manager than Mou who calls people out) because football has moved on so much that I feel you have to accept player power and pander to the team/individuals a lot more than you used to.
I don't think his approach can usefully be understood as a soft touch, "buddy buddy" one. Compared to Mourinho yes, but then that's true for practically anyone. At least against a scandinavian background, the most striking aspect of OGS' management style is how normal it is - that it stands out as something extraordinary says much more about how abnormal elite football has been in this regard than about anything else. It fundamentally really just looks like common sense, perfectly normal personnel management, the same any capable middle management person would use in any line of business. If you want people to develop and perform at their best, you help them find their strong areas and work on them, and instill a sense of confidence and mutual trust. Positive motivation works better than fear. Ultimately players have to take ownership of and responsibility for their own development and performance. And you treat people with respect, if you want them to behave loyally and responsibly. At the same time, you set standards for delivery and performance that you hold people to. Much easier to get acceptance for that than for some murky personal judgment that this or that player isn't trying hard enough or whatever.

None of that takes anything away from OGS - while the approach is simple and commonplace, it takes a lot to implement with such success, especially in an environment as fraught as that of a top PL club.
 

tomaldinho1

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I don't think his approach can usefully be understood as a soft touch, "buddy buddy" one. Compared to Mourinho yes, but then that's true for practically anyone. At least against a scandinavian background, the most striking aspect of OGS' management style is how normal it is - that it stands out as something extraordinary says much more about how abnormal elite football has been in this regard than about anything else. It fundamentally really just looks like common sense, perfectly normal personnel management, the same any capable middle management person would use in any line of business. If you want people to develop and perform at their best, you help them find their strong areas and work on them, and instill a sense of confidence and mutual trust. Positive motivation works better than fear. Ultimately players have to take ownership of and responsibility for their own development and performance. And you treat people with respect, if you want them to behave loyally and responsibly. At the same time, you set standards for delivery and performance that you hold people to. Much easier to get acceptance for that than for some murky personal judgment that this or that player isn't trying hard enough or whatever.

None of that takes anything away from OGS - while the approach is simple and commonplace, it takes a lot to implement with such success, especially in an environment as fraught as that of a top PL club.
Not sure where you got the 'soft touch' bit from. You can be buddies with players but retain control and be professional - that's how I see Ole; he's generally calm, seems approachable for all players and obviously will have high standards he expects from players but he won't try to get that through tough love and riling players up. Where I think he will differ from one of the more extreme authoritarian managers like Mou, Conte or Pep is I think he will trust players more to make their own decisions (i.e. it's not Ole's way or the highway) as seen in his treatment of Bruno and Maguire's fitness - he trusts experienced guys to know when they are tired/need a break.