Sachin Tendulkar

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Has any Indian on here considered standing as an MP on just a single manifesto of changing Mumbai's name to something related to Sachin?

Easy ticket I'd say!
 

amolbhatia50k

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It's not really. For example Petersen's average was higher than Richards' last year, but if anyone called him better or as good they would've been sent to a loony asylum. But as I've said, conditions have changed and it's a batsmen friendly game which wasn't the case pre 90s. So, perhaps batmen of pre 90s should be rated even higher, come to think of it.

But my point stands, you can't comment on players you've haven't been...regardless of stats. Stats will never give you a proper picture. Leave the likes of Rubber Chef to argue about players they never seen. Tendulkar is a great batsman so let's leave it at that. He's not the best I've seen and that's that really, although the greatest under 5ft5 most definitely.
That's that according to you though.

For me, Sachin's record speaks for itself. It's beyond what anyone else has achieved in the modern game. And it's stood the test of time. And the kind of pressure no other cricketer has faced. And the man started at 16. If he had started the way someone like Dhoni or Peterson did (when their game was well mature) he would average much higher. If he hadn't had those two or so years struggling with injuries, it would be through the roof. All of this despite times when at times the team was perennially 10/3 or worse abroad.

A technique that's ridiculously good, shoulders that can carry a nation and the ability to tear bowlers absolutely apart but also to play the watchful defensive game.
 

amolbhatia50k

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Has any Indian on here considered standing as an MP on just a single manifesto of changing Mumbai's name to something related to Sachin?

Easy ticket I'd say!
That's a great idea. Your Sachinpur suggestion did not go unnoticed :)

On another note, he was bloody pumped when he scored the winning runs today. He looks too hungry and excitable to be 37!
 

amolbhatia50k

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I remember once when I was a kid someone told me a Nostradamous type fellow had predicted that Sachin would die on his next birthday. I was genuinely rattled for a bit till someone knocked some sense into me. Hehe
 

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No use trying to convince people who regard other batsmen better than him. I know the desire to want a unanimous approval for his legendary status but you're not going to find it here, especially not from Spoony. I'm sure he regards Sachin as a fine batsman in his book and it's ridiculous if he's not in a cricket lover's top 3 of all time atleast(doesn't make sense, go watch lawn bowls, you spastic). The numbers and performances speak for themselves.

On the other hand, having watched a fair bit of Richards, I have to say i really think that guy was absolutely outstanding. I've regarded Dravid to be a better player than Sachin for years too. These are all keeping in mind that Sachin's possibly in his own separate section in the the pantheon of greats in the modern era.

People forget that Sachin's a shrewd bowler(or used to be, haven't seen him bowl for ages) and a good fielder too, in addition to that crazy run scoring.
 

amolbhatia50k

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No use trying to convince people who regard other batsmen better than him. I know the desire to want a unanimous approval for his legendary status but you're not going to find it here, especially not from Spoony. I'm sure he regards Sachin as a fine batsman in his book and it's ridiculous if he's not in a cricket lover's top 3 of all time atleast(doesn't make sense, go watch lawn bowls, you spastic). The numbers and performances speak for themselves.

On the other hand, having watched a fair bit of Richards, I have to say i really think that guy was absolutely outstanding. I've regarded Dravid to be a better player than Sachin for years too. These are all keeping in mind that Sachin's possibly in his own separate section in the the pantheon of greats in the modern era.

People forget that Sachin's a shrewd bowler(or used to be, haven't seen him bowl for ages) and a good fielder too, in addition to that crazy run scoring.
Oh I'm not trying to convince anyone. I'm just stating what I believe and believe to be fairly obvious. Anyone else can either fall in line or have another opinion.

Words simply don't do justice. One of the few reasons I feel proud of my country these days, sadly :(
 

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People forget that Sachin's a shrewd bowler(or used to be, haven't seen him bowl for ages) and a good fielder too, in addition to that crazy run scoring.
The biggest attribute Sachin possess is modesty and shying away from controversy, which is an absolute achievement around the murky establishment of Indian cricket. This all despite being literally worshipped and having more power than the Indian Prime Minister.
 

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You're off your trolley.

Greatest 5ft 4inch player though, I'll give you that.

Still think the likes of Lara, Ponting and Vaughan at their peaks were better.
You could say Lara is on par with Sachin and maybe even Ponting but Vaughan? Seriously? Just because he is on top of his game for like 4 years, does not make him on par with a legend like Tendulkar.
 

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"Thomas..It's up for grabs now - Thomas, righ
...... . .but the likes of Richards faced Lillee(best Aus fast bowler of all time), Hadlee, Imran(better than Younis, Akram and Akhtar), Thompson, Willis(best english fast bowler since Trueman), Botham, Kapil Devil(best Indian seamer ever) etc. They all bowled in much better conditions as well whereas post 80s the conditions favoured the batsmen. .....
......
I can come up with a bunch of bowlers as good if not better than the ones you've mentioned but it's not going to take this anywhere......
Where are they then ?

I don't think you'll come up with this 'list' because you know as you see those names above' you won't be able to match them or frankly get even close

Richards scoring runs against those attacks on those wickets is something that I'm afraid Sachin has never got close to.

In fact as good as Sachin is, looking at that list of bowlers makes me feel Viv Richards was even better than I thought
 

amolbhatia50k

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Where are they then ?

I don't think you'll come up with this 'list' because you know as you see those names above' you won't be able to match them or frankly get even close

Richards scoring runs against those attacks on those wickets is something that I'm afraid Sachin has never got close to.

In fact as good as Sachin is, looking at that list of bowlers makes me feel Viv Richards was even better than I thought
Yes Sachin made his debut in 2002. That will help you convince you he's not as good as he is.

I can't believe I even have to come up with this list. It's ridiculous. I'll save myself some time and say two things. Two of the best spinners of all time, Warne and Murli, played during Sachin's time. The best left arm fast bowler of all time, Wasim Akram, played during Sachin's time. I shouldn't really need to put together the list. People who know anything about the game should know the quality of bowlers we've seen during the last TWENTY YEARS.
 

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Richards scoring runs against those attacks on those wickets is something that I'm afraid Sachin has never got close to.

I
I think a 90s+ list of bowlers would be as good, to be fair. The likes of Ambrose, Younis, Akram, McGrath, Warne, Murali, Donald, Akhtar et al are as good as any. But yeah the wickets were more sporting in the 80s. Especially outside of the subcontinent.
 

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This guys is an absolute freak and champion of a player. He's still knocking us around for scores TWENTY fecking years after his debut, that's seriously just astounding when you think about it.

He's seriously such a joy to watch (as is VVS, for mine), and every single time he gets to the crease I just hope he puts on a show for me. I honestly couldn't care if hit tons against us every time we play, as I enjoy watching him so much.

What a player. And what a man.

(please please please let there never be any scandals or rubbish to come out about him, let him be remembered as a true great, second to Bradman, and a proper gent for the rest of history)





As far as the modern day great batsmen are concerned, and not to derail the thread, but: Tendulkar, Lara, Ponting.
 

amolbhatia50k

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This guys is an absolute freak and champion of a player. He's still knocking us around for scores TWENTY fecking years after his debut, that's seriously just astounding when you think about it.

He's seriously such a joy to watch (as is VVS, for mine), and every single time he gets to the crease I just hope he puts on a show for me. I honestly couldn't care if hit tons against us every time we play, as I enjoy watching him so much.

What a player. And what a man.

(please please please let there never be any scandals or rubbish to come out about him, let him be remembered as a true great, second to Bradman, and a proper gent for the rest of history)





As far as the modern day great batsmen are concerned, and not to derail the thread, but: Tendulkar, Lara, Ponting.
Suddenly grows extremely fond of cesc's_mullet.

I don't think anything will come out against him. He is one of sports true greats. And one of the great men to play sport.
 

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You're off your trolley.

Greatest 5ft 4inch player though, I'll give you that.

Still think the likes of Lara, Ponting and Vaughan at their peaks were better.
ESPNcricinfo all-time World XI: Tendulkar only current player in ESPNcricinfo all-time World XI | All-time XIs | Cricinfo Magazine | Cricinfo.com
The jury also seems to have settled the answer to the question "Who after Bradman?" The answer is Sachin Tendulkar, by a fair distance. Tendulkar, who stands a step away from 50 Test hundreds and whose lustre, in defiance of age, grows brighter with every passing day, was effectively voted, with 51 points, the fourth-greatest cricketer in the history of the game. In the batting stakes he was comfortably ahead of Viv Richards (42).

Brian Lara, Tendulkar's contemporary and great rival, didn't make it to the World XI, with 28 points.
The jury comprised one former captain from each of the top Test-playing teams - Ian Chappell, Clive Lloyd, Tony Greig, Duleep Mendis, Ali Bacher, Intikhab Alam, John Wright, Ajit Wadekar - and four cricket historians and writers.
But what do they know!


World XI: Jack Hobbs, Len Hutton, Don Bradman, Sachin Tendulkar, Viv Richards, Garry Sobers, Adam Gilchrist, Malcolm Marshall, Shane Warne, Wasim Akram, Dennis Lillee
 

amolbhatia50k

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Nice.

Still would have even higher up. Better than Warne. Warne was crap against the team that played spin the best. Sachin could do it against any team. And Sachin made Warne look seriously mediocre :D
 

amolbhatia50k

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Best batsman after Bradman would generally be a consensus amongst the cricketing fraternity. It's evident from this little exercise. But I'd debate whether Bradman himself should be included in such discussions. The game was too different for me to draw any comparison whatsoever.
 

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The surprise for me was how highly Sehwag's rated. If he continues to perform in the next 12-16 months(South Africa, England and Australia away), he'll have established himself as one of the all-time greats.

Ian Chappell's done an interview on cricinfo discussing the World XI they've put out. He says that after Bradman, Sehwag's the most destructive batsman in cricket. High compliment coming from Chappell, who really does know his onions.
 

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Dravid >>>>>>>>>>> Sehwag obviously. I think Dravid's seriously under-rated. People talk about technique and all that about the older players who no one's seen play, whose reputations are built on statistics and hearsay.. and I find it hard to imagine these people having better technique than Dravid.

Comparisons with Sehwag aren't fair.. Sehwag's an unique kind of cricketer. You don't use the word 'destructive' when it comes to test match cricket, but he's exactly that. He's a game-changer. If he proves his credentials in the tougher tours we have over the upcoming one year, he'll go down as a great.
 

amolbhatia50k

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Dravid >>>>>>>>>>> Sehwag obviously. I think Dravid's seriously under-rated. People talk about technique and all that about the older players who no one's seen play, whose reputations are built on statistics and hearsay.. and I find it hard to imagine these people having better technique than Dravid.

Comparisons with Sehwag aren't fair.. Sehwag's an unique kind of cricketer. You don't use the word 'destructive' when it comes to test match cricket, but he's exactly that. He's a game-changer. If he proves his credentials in the tougher tours we have over the upcoming one year, he'll go down as a great.
Dhoni too is a matchwinner but that doesn't always correlate to better. Dravid has won/saved tons of games through sheer grit and technique. Sehwag may blitz the opposition more but it comes much rarer than a class Dravid knock used to. Besides, Sehwag for me is flat track bully. It helps him that all the tracks everywhere are becoming flat these-a-days.

For me I don't know about terms such as great but he'll never be as good as the likes of Dravid for me. If the ball is doing all sorts of things, I know who I'd rely on out of the two.
 

amolbhatia50k

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Dravid >>>>>>>>>>> Sehwag obviously. I think Dravid's seriously under-rated. People talk about technique and all that about the older players who no one's seen play, whose reputations are built on statistics and hearsay.. and I find it hard to imagine these people having better technique than Dravid.

Comparisons with Sehwag aren't fair.. Sehwag's an unique kind of cricketer. You don't use the word 'destructive' when it comes to test match cricket, but he's exactly that. He's a game-changer. If he proves his credentials in the tougher tours we have over the upcoming one year, he'll go down as a great.
Dravid's last few years have REALLY hurt his reputation. I think it may have been better for his career had he retired when this whole T20 phenomenon came in and batting became a slugfest. He's gone from being revered by everyone to almost forgotten these days. He'll always be considered a great but I think these days more and more people seem to be forgetting his class.
 

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It's hard for me to believe that Sachin is a better batsman than Sobers or Viv Richards. They could and would cut any attack to ribbons under any conditions. At the same time they had flawless technique and a high test average.
 

amolbhatia50k

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It's hard for me to believe that Sachin is a better batsman than Sobers or Viv Richards. They could and would cut any attack to ribbons under any conditions. At the same time they had flawless technique and a high test average.
:lol:

Umm which of those doesn't apply to Sachin?
 

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It's hard for me to believe that Sachin is a better batsman than Sobers or Viv Richards. They could and would cut any attack to ribbons under any conditions. At the same time they had flawless technique and a high test average.
Can not comment about Sobers but just going by recorded matches I have seen, Richards is my favorite batsmen. Never argue with anyone who says he is better than Sachin. Both him and Lara are the only two modern day batsmen who can claim to IMO.

But with Richards it should be taken into account that he was playing in one of the best team of all time in every way. While Sachin has spent majority of his career in an average to poor team. Richard could slay away because he knew he had others to bail him out be it superb bowlers like Marshall or other batsmen. Only with advent of likes of Dravid and Laxman, Sachin has been afforded similar luxury and even then he did not have a WC bowling attack to compliment his efforts. He has had some cracking test hundreds which have been forgotten because they have been part of a losing effort. 169 vs SA in SA against likes of Donald and Pollock in their pomp, was at his attacking best but rest of the team did not capitalise on his form. Another hundred against Oz down under when he went in as the captain, IIRC no other batsmen even managed a score in thirties in that match.
 

amolbhatia50k

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Umm, you were saying here that Sachin is better than them:



In what way is he better?
His record under the pressure he faced, over the numbers of years he played, given the team he was in and the age he started at. IMO of course.

Playing for India is a bit like playing for England in football. It comes with a unique pressure. And when Sachin was at his best we were actually like England! A team with HUGE and unimaginable expectations but quite frankly, not really good enough to even come close to meeting them, forget meeting them.
 

amolbhatia50k

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Interesting quote I found which I wanted to post but didn't want to plague the World Cup thread with more derailment so,

"The pressure on me is nothing as compared to Sachin Tendulkar. Sachin, like God, must never fail. The crowd always expects him to succeed and it is too much pressure on him." - Mark Waugh

It explains what I'm talking about when I do mention the pressure he's faced in his career and how it is completely unique.
 

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Sachin Tendulkar's Yorkshire roots helped make him a master of modesty
The India legend's brief spell wearing the White Rose ushered in a new era at Headingley and kept a huge talent grounded
Sachin Tendulkar poses with a pint and a cloth cap after being chosen as the first non-Yorkshireman to play for the county. Photograph: Tony Harris/PA

Sachin Tendulkar was back at Wimbledon at the weekend, acknowledging the crowd's applause in the Royal Box for the fourth year in succession. A boyhood tennis nut, who idolised John McEnroe, India's great batsman spoke afterwards about his hour-long post-match summit with Roger Federer. "What a humble guy!" the Little Master said, immediately pinpointing the supreme quality that impresses him most.

It is the same one that has defined his own 23-year career, a humility in excelsis that has allowed him to weather an unparalleled level of scrutiny and adulation and still seem the unpretentiously modest child prodigy who scored his maiden first-class century at the age of 15.

It was never more apparent than in 1992 when, to much fanfare, he became Yorkshire's first overseas signing after Geoffrey Boycott and the club's cricket committee finally dismantled the Broad Acres-born policy that had, with a few breaches that were brushed under the carpet, prevailed for more than 70 years.

In the late 1970s and 80s, Yorkshire's civil war waged by pro and anti-Boycott factions had left the club thoroughly demoralised, impoverished and moribund both on and off the field. The odd cherished twitch on the thread – winning the John Player League under the captaincy of a 51-year-old Ray Illingworth in 1983 and victory in the Benson and Hedges Cup final at Lord's four years later – papered over the cracks. But the once-dominant county had been usurped in the championship by the new powerhouses of Essex and Middlesex.

Once Boycott's committee had voted, by a margin of 18 to one, to break with the past, they put Australia's Dean Jones on standby, then bowing to the wishes of the captain, Martyn Moxon, signed up a fast bowler instead, Jones's compatriot Craig McDermott. Due to make his debut on Good Friday, McDermott telephoned his new employers a month before his scheduled arrival and pulled out with a groin injury, provoking much spluttering at Headingley.

A year earlier Fred Trueman had called the decision to recruit an overseas player "a bloody disgrace" and the revolutionaries were forced on to the back foot by McDermott's withdrawal. They reacted to the crisis with a masterstroke, using the Bradford League veteran and Dewsbury businessman Solly Adam, who had recruited India's Vinod Kambli to play for Spen Victoria, to approach Kambli's schoolmate Tendulkar to fill the void.

After a week's thought he agreed and flew in for practice, posing for photographs with a flat cap barely containing his curls and holding up a pint of beer, which made him the most incongruous Tetley Bitterman to date.

At the age of 19 he had scored three Test centuries, including a brilliant one at Old Trafford in 1990 when Eddie Hemmings grassed a straightforward caught-and-bowled chance to give him a life, and a sparkling counter-attacking carnival of square cuts on a blood-curdlingly fast track at Perth in 1992.

His maturity had long since marked him out and he quickly acclimatised to the Yorkshire dressing room. After only a few weeks the coach, Steve Oldham, said: "They are all better players for his presence. His confidence is infectious, they all want to bat with him." Fifteen hundred new members joined the club, the same number of McDermott mugs the Yorkshire shop had to send to landfill, and though the attempt of a few wags on the Western Terrace to nickname him "Seth" didn't catch on, Tendulkar was relished during his time with the club.

He asked for his name to be removed from his sponsored car after attracting too much attention but he was largely left alone on his days off, heading off to Blackpool pleasure beach to ride the Big One time and again and enjoying his first experience of eating fish and chips out of newspaper.

In 16 championship games he scored 1,070 runs, demonstrating his formidable blend of exquisite timing, judgment, improvisation and an eye the Australians likened to that of a dead fish. He scored only one century, at Chester-le-Street, but was caught short in the 80s three times and the 90s twice. It didn't make much difference to the club's fortunes on the field as they finished 16th in the table a month after he had left to join up with India.

But a decade later, when he was inducted as one of five great Yorkshire players, Tendulkar said: "I will always remember this as one of the greatest four and a half months I've spent in my life."

Results do not tell the whole story. For many of us who dreamed of wearing the White Rose and failed to make the grade, Tendulkar's spell at the club and the more tolerant era he helped to usher in made frustrated ambitions easier to bear. In 2002 he scored 193 for India at Headingley as England were demolished by an innings to give the Yorkshire public the century they had craved 10 years earlier – and no Tyke begrudged him. After all, he's one of us.
 

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Actor Sachin Tendulkar gets tax break

Sachin Tendulkar, super God of cricket, has formally declared that he is an actor and not a cricketer. The excuse: he models for TV advertisements. In order to save tax of around Rs 2 crore on income derived from doing TV commercials, Tendulkar told the Income Tax tribunal that acting, not cricket, is his profession. The tribunal accepted that he is an artist on the grounds that "he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity in the commercials".

Tendulkar was levied an income tax of Rs 2,08,59,707 on the income of Rs 5,92,31,211 that he earned from ESPN Star Sports, PepsiCo and Visa in foreign currency during 2001-02 and 2004-05. He had challenged the order of the Commissioner of Income Tax-Appeal (CIT-A), to pay up. In an order on May 20, the tribunal ruled that Tendulkar could claim deduction in tax on his income from modelling as he is an artist.

Tendulkar had claimed deduction of tax under Section 80RR of the Income Tax Act. The section states that a person can claim tax deduction if he is a playwright, artist, musician, actor or sportsman and the income for which deduction is claimed is derived by him in the exercise of his profession.

When the assessing officer asked Tendulkar to explain the nature of his profession, the master blaster submitted that "he is a popular model who acts in various commercials for endorsing products of various companies". He further stated that the income derived by him from 'acting' had been reflected as income from "business and profession" whereas income from playing cricket was reflected as "income from other sources" since he is a non-professional cricketer. Tendulkar explained that the claimed deduction in tax was from the exercise of his profession as an 'actor'.

The assessing officer rejected Tendulkar's claim and looked up the dictionary for the meaning of the term 'professional'. "It could be correct to say that playing cricket is the source of his livelihood and is therefore his profession," the officer observed, adding that "if Sachin is not a cricketer, then who is a cricketer?" He noted that Tendulkar had received remuneration for providing a wide variety of services to these companies. The various activities mentioned in the agreement with these companies had nothing to do with his claim of being an actor. Therefore, the officer said, his claim was not justified. Tendulkar has an agreement with these companies for the use of the name, photo, original voice, clothing, footwear, playing product spokesman, personal and media appearances.

"It is true that while appearing in ad films Tendulkar would have to dress in a certain way and would have to follow the script suggested by the director. However, that does not make him an actor. In all the advertisements in which he appears, what is highlighted is his personality as a cricketer. It is important to note that the company that wants Tendulkar to endorse its brand uses him because he is Sachin Tendulkar, the cricketing legend," the officer noted.

After his claim was rejected, Tendulkar submitted that he should be considered an 'artist' for the purpose of Section 80RR. He submitted that the meaning of 'artist' be read along with the several clauses of the endorsement agreements. However, the CIT-A did not buy this argument. He ruled: "Tendulkar is primarily involved in playing cricket and irrespective of whether he is a professional or not, it cannot be disputed that his profession is playing cricket. Tendulkar is not being paid for his activities as an actor or his performance as an artist. The nature and quality of his acting or performance as an artist would never have resulted in the contracts and payments made out to him."

Tendulkar appealed against this ruling to the tribunal. An earlier ruling by the tribunal allowing tax deduction to actor Amitabh Bachchan helped his case. In 2004, the tribunal had ruled that the income derived by Bachchan as a host of TV show Kaun Banega Crorepati (KBC) was liable for deduction of tax under Section 80RR because he used his skills as an artist in the show.

Asha Vijayaraghavan, judicial member of the tribunal, and R.K. Panda, accountant member, ruled: "While appearing in advertisements and commercials Tendulkar has to face the lights and camera. As a model he brings to his work a degree of imagination, creativity and skill to arrange elements in a manner that would affect human senses and emotions and to have an aesthetic value. No doubt, being a successful cricketer has added to his brand value as a model. But the fact remains that he has to use his own skills, imagination and creativity. Every sportsman does not possess that degree of talent or skill or creativity to face the lights and camera. The income received by him from modeling and appearing in TV commercials and similar activities can be termed as income derived from the profession of an artist."

Tendulkar had also claimed deduction of Rs 57,969 towards staff welfare expenses that included expenses incurred on tea and snacks provided to his staff, Rs 50,000 each on account of entertainment expenses and telephone expenses and Rs 1,42,824 on account of car expenses. However, the tribunal dismissed these claims saying that the use of telephone, car and food was for him and his family.

This is one act where the man who holds almost all the batting records in cricket has outdone himself.
...
 

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I've mentioned this before but I find our obsession with Tendulkar bit sickening. The hype and hero worship he gets is ridiculous; some people are more disappointed when he misses out on a century than when India lose.

Undoubtedly the best batsman in cricket over the last 20 years, but no one deserves such blind adulation. At least if he had won us a WC or a series in Australia the whole 'Tendulkar is God' thing might have been understandable. I doubt even Maradona gets such treatment in Argentina.
:)
 

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It's a team sport. Neither of them 'won it' for us.

However, if you look at Sachin's contribution to India's ODI team til the 2011 WC, it would be fair to say he has had more of an impact that anyone else, and that's probably putting it mildly.

Looking at just the World Cups, top scorer in the 1996 and 2003 editions, where India reached the semis and finals, ; and second by 18 runs in the 2011 edition which we won(when he was almost 38 years old).