SARS CoV-2 coronavirus / Covid-19 (No tin foil hat silliness please)

mav_9me

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Thanks both - I'm in India and there's no guidelines around this. I was asking for the right thing to do as you say - because I come in contact with my parents who are elderly, and I'd also like to not spread it around if I have it. I am comfortable isolating for as long as it takes as I work from home and have my own place.

The person I met was - I am told now - unwell on the day I met him and I spent 5 hours indoors.
Vaccinated people are less likely to be infectious, and if infectious likely less duration of infectivity and less infectivity too. As such I would just be cautious and maybe try to isolate for 5 days or so (particularly avoid elderly and vulnerable) and if no symptoms unlikely that you have it too. Just an educated guess though. That's what I would do.
 

Garethw

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Oh perfect. I’ve got a free holiday with my partner’s family on a canal boat for a week during half term so I guess that will be out of the question.
I’ve now seen that the government has denied the October fire breaker scenario. As you know though, you can’t trust a bloody word this lot says.
 

UnrelatedPsuedo

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Anyone gone on holiday lately? I'm starting to get tempted.
Loads of times. Leaving a place of high incidence and low protection measures and going to a place of low incidence and high protection measures is a no brainer.

I’ve spent something like 3 months overseas since the start of the Pandemic.

If you go, please use Testing For All. They’re a not for profit test provider. Their service is great and you’re not lining a Tories pocket.
 
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In the UK, if you get symptoms, get a PCR test and stay home. If the test comes back negative you don't have to quarantine any longer, assuming you aren't actually still ill that is. It's best if people don't give each other other respiratory viruses as well really.
Are you sure. Not from what we’ve read
 

Lj82

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The inactivated virus vaccines are all struggling really. The Cuban one has gone directly to a three dose model. The Chinese ones (outside China) will probably get a mRNA third/booster dose to push the efficacy up.

Very unusual for him to have the misfortune of testing positive in March and again now, as that probably means he's caught Delta twice. If that becomes common it will definitely be a problem.
My friend who was based in Dubai took the sinopharm vaccine while he was there. When he returned to Singapore, he learned that a friend of his who also took the vaccines in Dubai did an antibody test in Singapore and found that he had zero antibodies. They immediately went for the Pfizer vaccine that is available here.
 

jojojo

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Are you sure. Not from what we’ve read
It's a messy business and isn't getting any less complicated but:
"If you have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result after being tested because you had symptoms
If your PCR test result is negative but you still have symptoms, you may have another viral illness such as a cold, flu or a stomach bug. You should stay at home until you feel well and for at least 2 more days if you have had diarrhoea or vomiting. Seek medical attention if you are concerned about your symptoms.

You can stop isolating as long as:

- you are well and have not had diarrhoea or vomiting for at least 2 days
- no one else in your household has symptoms
- no one else in your household has tested positive for COVID-19
- you have not been advised by NHS Test and Trace that you are legally required to self-isolate

Anyone in your household who is isolating because of your symptoms can also stop isolating."
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection
 
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It's a messy business and isn't getting any less complicated but:
"If you have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result after being tested because you had symptoms
If your PCR test result is negative but you still have symptoms, you may have another viral illness such as a cold, flu or a stomach bug. You should stay at home until you feel well and for at least 2 more days if you have had diarrhoea or vomiting. Seek medical attention if you are concerned about your symptoms.

You can stop isolating as long as:

- you are well and have not had diarrhoea or vomiting for at least 2 days
- no one else in your household has symptoms
- no one else in your household has tested positive for COVID-19
- you have not been advised by NHS Test and Trace that you are legally required to self-isolate

Anyone in your household who is isolating because of your symptoms can also stop isolating."
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection
Interesting.

It’s so confusing as there’s so many contradicting gov.uk and nhs pages
 

0le

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Interesting.

It’s so confusing as there’s so many contradicting gov.uk and nhs pages
Use the one with the latest page update.
 

mav_9me

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Interesting.

It’s so confusing as there’s so many contradicting gov.uk and nhs pages
The mess reflects the difficult situation.

Vaccinated people transmit less but not zero. So how do we deal with the possibility of false negative PCR for Covid? No idea. I think based off common sense, if PCR is negative you should stop isolating. But who knows. :Shrugs shoulders:
 

Forevergiggs1

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My Mum applied for her covid passport about a week before coming to Spain with all the relevant details such as flight number as N.Ireland are only handing out passports to people already booked on flights. Luckily she didn't need it because It didn't arrive. Finally after a month and threats it arrived with a 3 month expiration date.

What happens here? Is it automatically renewed (which seems stupid after only 3 months) or will it take booster shots for her to be eligible again? There's so little information on the, matter that it really is disgusting.
 

jojojo

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My Mum applied for her covid passport about a week before coming to Spain with all the relevant details such as flight number as N.Ireland are only handing out passports to people already booked on flights. Luckily she didn't need it because It didn't arrive. Finally after a month and threats it arrived with a 3 month expiration date.

What happens here? Is it automatically renewed (which seems stupid after only 3 months) or will it take booster shots for her to be eligible again? There's so little information on the, matter that it really is disgusting.
Another part of the "vaccine passports = easier said than done" mystery picture at the moment.

In England she could download the NHS app and after some messing around with settings and ID tests, she'd get a domestic pass (basically a tick and a QR code) and a travel pass (that actually lists vaccines taken and their dates again with QR codes). The passes are valid for a month but automatically roll forward. You can also get a printed version of your vaccine record from 119 - no expiry date but some countries are already saying "second dose within the last 9 months" as standard, which means that some people's jabs will start running out soon.

In NI they're still working on it. Sounds like they haven't really got there yet - but then that's true of just about everywhere.
 

zing

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Vaccinated people are less likely to be infectious, and if infectious likely less duration of infectivity and less infectivity too. As such I would just be cautious and maybe try to isolate for 5 days or so (particularly avoid elderly and vulnerable) and if no symptoms unlikely that you have it too. Just an educated guess though. That's what I would do.
Thanks.

Been 5 days - no symptoms and tested negative. I'm going to stay in for 5 more, do another test before I head out.
 

Suv666

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My friend had COVID in March - this is India at the beginning of the second wave, so it presumably would’ve been delta.. he took the Indian vaccine last month and the second dose was a week ago. Today he’s tested positive for COVID again — both times he’s had similar symptoms of fever of around 101.. this time it’s a little worse. How improbable is this?..
Whereabouts in India are you located? Seeing reports of rising cases in Mumbai. I'm worried a third wave might be coming
 

11101

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Another part of the "vaccine passports = easier said than done" mystery picture at the moment.

In England she could download the NHS app and after some messing around with settings and ID tests, she'd get a domestic pass (basically a tick and a QR code) and a travel pass (that actually lists vaccines taken and their dates again with QR codes). The passes are valid for a month but automatically roll forward. You can also get a printed version of your vaccine record from 119 - no expiry date but some countries are already saying "second dose within the last 9 months" as standard, which means that some people's jabs will start running out soon.

In NI they're still working on it. Sounds like they haven't really got there yet - but then that's true of just about everywhere.
The thing is all developed countries started vaccinating at the same time so some people will be coming to the end of their passport validity, meaning unless they start boosters soon those countries will have no choice but to extend validity. Its already happening in some places.
 

Pogue Mahone

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The thing is all developed countries started vaccinating at the same time so some people will be coming to the end of their passport validity, meaning unless they start boosters soon those countries will have no choice but to extend validity. Its already happening in some places.
Is there any consensus on duration of passport validity? The science is far from clear. The data supposedly showing waning efficacy is potentially confounded and only seems to be an issue in the elderly (who we always knew would respond less well to vaccination).

There’s basically no evidence of a need for boosters in the young or middle aged, so doesn’t make any sense to insist on a fixed validity duration for all ages.
 

jojojo

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UK ICU report is out. Mostly confirming some trends from this wave compared to last. Average admission age (now 51) is starting to drift back up, as younger age groups get vaccinated - but that still means roughly a quarter of admissions are between 16 and 38.

Some inequalities are more marked than ever, with people living in the most deprived areas 4 times as likely to end up in ICU as the least deprived, and admissions of black patients rising from 5% to 10%. Also seeing more pregnant/recently pregnant women in ICU than ever. These ratios are more or less direct reflections of vaccination patterns/take-up.




Thread is based on:
https://www.icnarc.org/Our-Audit/Audits/Cmp/Reports
 

Dave_MUFC

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Anyone gone on holiday lately? I'm starting to get tempted.
As said above me, the fact that I would most likely be in a country with much lower cases if I was to go abroad doesn't worry me in the slightest, but the travelling aspect really puts me off.

Pre-Covid, I already hated the flying process, I get really anxious about all the timing and staying stuck in a plane seat etc. and my body hates me for it. So couldn't imagine how it would be considering I'm quite aware with this virus, so not comfortable with people I don't know staying in close proximity to me, without any outside air flow, and having to wear a mask for hours on end, along with all the confusing test procedures that go along with it.

I would say it's fine to wait a couple of months until 2022, but we've been saying this for nigh on a year now, with no considerable improvements, so not really sure how it's going to pan out in the long term.

Two years without any flying for me so far, which I think is the longest ever for me.

I'm sorely tempted to get the car in the Euro tunnel and drive over through France, as that would be a lot more relaxed, being able to sit in your own confined space, and a lot more freedom to move around while travelling, although I need to muster up the courage to drive on the other side of the road first :lol:
 

Forevergiggs1

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Another part of the "vaccine passports = easier said than done" mystery picture at the moment.

In England she could download the NHS app and after some messing around with settings and ID tests, she'd get a domestic pass (basically a tick and a QR code) and a travel pass (that actually lists vaccines taken and their dates again with QR codes). The passes are valid for a month but automatically roll forward. You can also get a printed version of your vaccine record from 119 - no expiry date but some countries are already saying "second dose within the last 9 months" as standard, which means that some people's jabs will start running out soon.

In NI they're still working on it. Sounds like they haven't really got there yet - but then that's true of just about everywhere.
Many thanks for the clarification. It seems the N.Ireland government (??) are too busy bickering between themselves to actually govern and have been a mitigating disaster ever since the pandemic started.

In Cataluña we have an application called La meva salut (my health) which means I can access my medical records any time I want and gives results of any tests I've had within 24 hours. Within 10 minutes of my second pfizer dose I was sent the European digital covid passport which as far as I can tell doesn't have any expiration date. Whether that will change anytime soon is anyones guess but it really is embarrassing the way some countries (N.Ireland) have been dealing with the pandemic since the get go.
 

zing

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As said above me, the fact that I would most likely be in a country with much lower cases if I was to go abroad doesn't worry me in the slightest, but the travelling aspect really puts me off.
Does this actually check out? If you're traveling, you'd be going around and running into way more people than if you were living at home and working.
 

11101

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Is there any consensus on duration of passport validity? The science is far from clear. The data supposedly showing waning efficacy is potentially confounded and only seems to be an issue in the elderly (who we always knew would respond less well to vaccination).

There’s basically no evidence of a need for boosters in the young or middle aged, so doesn’t make any sense to insist on a fixed validity duration for all ages.
No. Italy had 9 months but is now upping it to 1 year. Some others have done similar but there is no consensus. It's not a science problem though its political. Governments can't place restrictions back on citizens who got the vaccines early if the booster campaigns are not up and running yet.
 

kps88

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As said above me, the fact that I would most likely be in a country with much lower cases if I was to go abroad doesn't worry me in the slightest, but the travelling aspect really puts me off.

Pre-Covid, I already hated the flying process, I get really anxious about all the timing and staying stuck in a plane seat etc. and my body hates me for it. So couldn't imagine how it would be considering I'm quite aware with this virus, so not comfortable with people I don't know staying in close proximity to me, without any outside air flow, and having to wear a mask for hours on end, along with all the confusing test procedures that go along with it.

I would say it's fine to wait a couple of months until 2022, but we've been saying this for nigh on a year now, with no considerable improvements, so not really sure how it's going to pan out in the long term.

Two years without any flying for me so far, which I think is the longest ever for me.

I'm sorely tempted to get the car in the Euro tunnel and drive over through France, as that would be a lot more relaxed, being able to sit in your own confined space, and a lot more freedom to move around while travelling, although I need to muster up the courage to drive on the other side of the road first :lol:
Yeah I get all that. It’s the commute that would be the most stressful. I’m actually outside the UK but want to visit London to meet friends/family I haven’t seen in a while. But I’m unsure how safe London is right now since it looks like life is pretty much back to normal for most people there. But I also know it’s either now or next summer as things will likely get worse during the winter.
 

Dave_MUFC

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Does this actually check out? If you're traveling, you'd be going around and running into way more people than if you were living at home and working.
Suppose it depends what you intend on doing. If you're planning on eating indoors, going to bars which are quite closed off, indoor events etc. sure, but if I was to be abroad around now, I would be sticking to outdoor places almost all the time, and get a flat for me and whoever I'm with. The one main advantage of the Mediterranean countries, is that they're still hot enough now to be able to have all windows and doors open in venues, and outdoor dining and bars almost everywhere. Which also makes it easier to make plans like hiking and swimming etc. outdoors.

Biggest issue with Covid in this country is the weather turning (ignoring the last 3 days we've had, as tomorrow we'll be going cooler again). Means most bars and restaurants will be indoors and closed up, and people can't really make outdoor plans when it's raining every other day.
Yeah I get all that. It’s the commute that would be the most stressful. I’m actually outside the UK but want to visit London to meet friends/family I haven’t seen in a while. But I’m unsure how safe London is right now since it looks like life is pretty much back to normal for most people there. But I also know it’s either now or next summer as things will likely get worse during the winter.
From my point of view, it's seemed like the cases have been hovering at a steady figure for the last couple of months, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, although being considerably higher than the rest of Europe, it's not great.

A few weeks ago, it did seem to quieten down from an anecdotal view, but over the last 2-3 weeks, I've been hearing about people I know getting the virus, including my vet and mechanic! Think it's aligned with the poor weather we were having for a while throughout August.
 

berbatrick

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that's a pretty drastic difference, i wonder if there are other factors as well. but another data point that backs intuitive logic.

...

@Pogue Mahone

It was on the basis of this testing that they decided yesterday to stop letting us eat at restaurants - I think the large-scale testing helped make a (correct) decision.
So after one week of re-imposing (not very strictly followed) indoor masking and no-eating rules at my university, positivity rate went from 1% to 0.5%.
https://coronavirus.duke.edu/covid-testing/
 

jojojo

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that's a pretty drastic difference, i wonder if there are other factors as well. but another data point that backs intuitive logic.

...



So after one week of re-imposing (not very strictly followed) indoor masking and no-eating rules at my university, positivity rate went from 1% to 0.5%.
https://coronavirus.duke.edu/covid-testing/
Really hard to know what does make a difference. Overall vaccination rates in the community and within households have a massive impact on what goes on in schools.

One thing that masks certainly do, amongst teens/adults particularly is remind us that we are still in a pandemic. So wearing masks reminds us to do other things like social distancing, avoiding indoor socialising etc.

Those behavioural modifications seem to kick in really quickly as well, and case rates follow.
 

decorativeed

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As said above me, the fact that I would most likely be in a country with much lower cases if I was to go abroad doesn't worry me in the slightest, but the travelling aspect really puts me off.

Pre-Covid, I already hated the flying process, I get really anxious about all the timing and staying stuck in a plane seat etc. and my body hates me for it. So couldn't imagine how it would be considering I'm quite aware with this virus, so not comfortable with people I don't know staying in close proximity to me, without any outside air flow, and having to wear a mask for hours on end, along with all the confusing test procedures that go along with it.

I would say it's fine to wait a couple of months until 2022, but we've been saying this for nigh on a year now, with no considerable improvements, so not really sure how it's going to pan out in the long term.

Two years without any flying for me so far, which I think is the longest ever for me.

I'm sorely tempted to get the car in the Euro tunnel and drive over through France, as that would be a lot more relaxed, being able to sit in your own confined space, and a lot more freedom to move around while travelling, although I need to muster up the courage to drive on the other side of the road first :lol:
I'm with you on the anxieties of flying, but the air in a plane comes from the air outside a plane and is constantly being replaced. It's probably much better than being on a train or similar.
 

mav_9me

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I'm with you on the anxieties of flying, but the air in a plane comes from the air outside a plane and is constantly being replaced. It's probably much better than being on a train or similar.
Southwest in USA notes they have hepa filters and filter the air every 3-5 mins. For what it's worth.
 

snk123

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Not very, unfortunately.

Assuming “Indian vaccine” is AZ then he wouldn’t be fully protected a week after the second dose so he can consider himself very unlucky.
But he's had Covid so he should be fine. Natural immunity works just as well as the vaccine if not better.
 

golden_blunder

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Have to take the kids (6 & 9) for a COVID test later today. Couple of confirmed cases in other classes at their school but they seemed ok till last night - warm, coughing, runny nose, sore tummy
 

Buster15

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So. Seems like the British people are happy to accept a death rate from covid of about 40,000 a year based on the current rate.
All so we can walk around without having to wear a face covering and go to rock concerts etc.
Such a small price to pay for so called 'freedom'.
 

horsechoker

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So. Seems like the British people are happy to accept a death rate from covid of about 40,000 a year based on the current rate.
All so we can walk around without having to wear a face covering and go to rock concerts etc.
Such a small price to pay for so called 'freedom'.
I'm alright Jack
 

King Eric 7

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So. Seems like the British people are happy to accept a death rate from covid of about 40,000 a year based on the current rate.
All so we can walk around without having to wear a face covering and go to rock concerts etc.
Such a small price to pay for so called 'freedom'.
Think this is a bit harsh. A lot of human behaviour causes deaths, not just deaths related to covid. There's only so many restrictions we can take before quality of life, mental and physical wellbeing starts to plummet.

As far as masks go, I don't know how many lives they may save per year, but I would suspect that having a mask mandate in place isn't going to dramatically change that number you quoted.
 

Paul the Wolf

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So. Seems like the British people are happy to accept a death rate from covid of about 40,000 a year based on the current rate.
All so we can walk around without having to wear a face covering and go to rock concerts etc.
Such a small price to pay for so called 'freedom'.
Same as ID cards. Why is it?
I've got both. Doesn't cost anything.
Takes ten seconds to check like showing your ticket.
It's ridiculous.

The number of vaccinations in the UK seems to have dropped off a cliff as well. A few months ago France were way behind , now they're pulling further and further away as are other countries; What's going on?
They think it's all over. It isn't now.
 
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Buster15

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Think this is a bit harsh. A lot of human behaviour causes deaths, not just deaths related to covid. There's only so many restrictions we can take before quality of life, mental and physical wellbeing starts to plummet.

As far as masks go, I don't know how many lives they may save per year, but I would suspect that having a mask mandate in place isn't going to dramatically change that number you quoted.
Well I don't agree it is a bit harsh.
The UK has had a pretty successful vaccination programme. And yet following lifting of the restrictions where the daily number of deaths was in the low tens and even single figures, we are firmly back to the highest in Europe with typically 150 per day.
That is the price of freedom.