What are your feelings on Roy Keane?

Irwin99

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A really underrated performance from Keano was the 1-1 game at OT in 99/00 (on Youtube) where I think we were just back from that world club championship thing and the players were obviously knackered. Wenger dominated the game tactically, and Vieira, Parlour and Petit were beating Keane and Butt in midfield and basically our entire team just look shattered. The intensity of the performance increased as the game went on and Keane just spat and snarled his through the match to get us through it. He stopped one certain Arsenal goal with a vital block and ran the entire length of the pitch to tackle Freddie Ljunberg on a counter attack :lol: His intensity is fantastic to watch, there's no question that youre not gonna be inspired by that if you are his teammate.
 

Jim Beam

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I once tried confessing my feelings to Roy Keane. He gave me a look of utter disbelief then shook his head, wandered off and grew a beard. I'm absolutely in love with that man - and despite his best of efforts towards making himself unattractive - not even that ugly beard nor a restraining order could discourage it.
:lol:
 

Foxbatt

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Juan Mata is a very nice guy and always plays with a smile on his face and do nice things off the pitch and write a very good blog etc and gives to charity too. I do not think anyone has a bad word to say about Mata. But give me Roy Keane on the pitch any time over Mata. He is not there to be nice and polite and do diplomatic stuff. He was at United to win things and to drive the team. He did his job better than any other at United.
 

Hughie77

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As a Utd player legend no doubt! But as a person wherever he's been coaching , managing he's left under a cloud, he upsets to many people all the time.
He talks as a pundit very good, but then has to put his twopence worth in of something which really doesn't matter.
Watched a show few years back with him and Viera picking the best players they played with and Manager.

Viera picked the usual Arsenal players, Kean didn't pick Scholes Viera was bemused, and his Manager pick was Cloughie?

I was sour grapes and a dig, which Viera could clearly see. His status he has spoilt it himself, he's forthright as a man but can also be a fool to himself with what he comes out with at times. I'd still love him in our midfield mind.
 

Foxbatt

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I think he did give the reason why he did not pick Scholes because he had to pick himself and he did admit that if he did not have to pick himself he would have picked Scholes. As for Cloughie, he won the European Cup twice with a team no one ever expected to win the darn thing and also it was the during the peak of his fight with SAF.
 

2cents

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I think he did give the reason why he did not pick Scholes because he had to pick himself and he did admit that if he did not have to pick himself he would have picked Scholes. As for Cloughie, he won the European Cup twice with a team no one ever expected to win the darn thing and also it was the during the peak of his fight with SAF.
He picked Ince! A fine player no doubt, but not in Scholes' league.
 

Ooge_

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Not a gentleman type of Leader like James Bond, more a street type of Leader like Liam Neeson. Also i was to young to really watch him a lot. Therefore I was more impressed by Lampard.
 

bazalini

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Roy Keane was and still is the second greatest midfield player ever. Bryan Robson was number 1.

A guy I know played in midfield with Keane in an Ireland under 21 match and recalls how Keane told him to calm the fcuk down, quit running around like a clown and let the ball come to you.
 

Murder on Zidane's Floor

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Not sure if posted but some of the comments in this are unbelievable.

"Roy is doing his team-talk and going around to a couple of lads and, rightly or wrongly, he was talking to one lad from London who was 19 and said 'look, I don't think you are going to make it in the game. I don't see you being consistent enough, you will probably be back in London next year doing drive-by shootings with your friends'.

"We are all sitting there, 'Holy God'.

"Roy went on 'one week I look at you and you're controlling the game, the next week I can't find you on the pitch, but it's OK because I don't blame you, I blame your parents for the way they brought you up'.
 

Billy Blaggs

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Hahaha

“do you want to be a footballer, or do you want to collect piss for a living like that fella?' ”
That's just being a fecking prick. Why belittle the guy doing his job that has nothing to do with the team?
He was a brilliant player but I can't imagine many of us would be able to put up wit him unless he was talking about Utd.
 

poleglass red

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Well it didn’t show on the pitch.
And I still miss him
the original poster got mixed up, he drank big time back in the early days. Remember the likes of Robbo and that was still there when he first came. But later on he pretty much went of it completely, he was pretty clear about it in his book
 

Irwin99

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the original poster got mixed up, he drank big time back in the early days. Remember the likes of Robbo and that was still there when he first came. But later on he pretty much went of it completely, he was pretty clear about it in his book
Yeah I think it was after the cruciate injury that he stopped drinking as much. His body fat shrank to a very low level around then according to the club, 5% or something.
 

blue blue

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Mixed feelings.

What he did to Mick McCarthy at the 2002 World Cup was unforgivable. OK so the "preparations" may have been not up to standard but you are there so get on with it. He let his team mates and country down badly. I think he blamed McCarthy for the problems but it was later identified that others were to blame for the poor preparations. Ireland did well and were judged to be the 9th best team without him. Imagine what could have happened if he had towed the line and just got on with things.
 

Foxbatt

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What Mick McCarthy did to him was unforgivable too. There are two sides to every story. You simply cannot treat every player by the same yardstick. It was only yesterday that an ex United player stated SAF never gave Ronaldo the hairdryer treatment.
To the Irish or most of them it was a lark simply going to the WC. For a player like Keane as he told SAF, he is going there to win it. The first problem was the flight itself. The players were in economy and the FAI officials were in business class. For a professional player like Keane it was not acceptable.
Then they had issues with the food and also the kit arrived late and the they had to practice on a parking lot. Saipan was not the place to train if you are serious about the world cup. Keane then gave an interview saying that he is fed up and going to retire after the WC. McCarthy should have taken him aside and dealt with it on a one to one situation. Instead he laid into Keane in a special team meeting to put him on the carpet. It was bound to end up in disaster. As a Manager he should have known how to deal with individual players. Cole and Sheringham never spoke to each other during their playing days at United but both of them and SAF handled it so well no one knew they disliked each other. Roy Keane was professional enough to give his all for his country no matter he disliked the Manager. Without Keane Ireland would not have qualified for the WC. McCarthy was probably jealous of the success of Keane and his refusal to kowtow to him.
A better Manager would have handled it much better given the fact the whole episode was a disaster for any professional football team given the mess the Irish FA created in handling everything from the travel arrangements to the hotel to the food to the practice sessions. It was as if it was organised by a Sunday League club and not the FA of a country playing in the World Cup.
 
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Keefy18

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His desire to win was incredible, that has to be admired for sure.

Outside of that the man is an absolute bully. Takes great satisfaction in undermining others to enforce his own will on others.
 

Eoin McMahon

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Firstly I am also Irish born and reared on the site of an old English army barracks, that was renamed St Michael's's (mistake) estate, so I think you know where I going here, I watched Paul from the time he made his first appearance at Richmond park, and to just put his lack of training down to booze is a joke, as his knees were shot to bits and half the reason he couldn't train.And people knew long before he finished playing his problems with booze as Giles highlighted it prior euro 88.And remember AF got shot and said he didn't think unlike with Robbo he could get Paul to control it.

As for Roy heard stories (ex u16's Eire and Drogheda coach Noel White) about his weirdness and coldness towards people when he was picked along with others to do a FAI course when he was 15 and how he refuse to mix with the other lads.

As a player for us, Legend and I know that word is well over used at this club by fans, but this guy, yes, as a person, comes across as a arrogant bitter person, the kind you expect from a person who was 50 and live 42 of them homeless, but then there is Roy who will do anything for certain Charities, like the Blind one he really put effort into here in Eire.

Best way to describe him, he's an enigma.
I agree McGrath's lack of training was't just down to the booze and i didn't mean for my post to come across like i felt that it was solely to blame. Paul McGrath is one of the greatest players to come out of Ireland and should be considered one of the best center backs to play in the Premier League. My post was not intended to slate the man or his ability as a footballer which personally will never be in doubt but rather to illustrate to people what he was going through at the time and to somehow comprehend how McGrath did what he did.

McGrath was one of many players in the early PL days who grew up in a drinking culture that was accepted as a part of the game. Off the top of my head Paul Gascoigne, Tony Adams, Paul Merson and Kenny Sansom are a few more top players that struggled with similar problems but also maintained their career at the highest level for years. It still leaves me stuck between admiration for what they achieved regardless of their problems or feeling dissatisfied by the idea of what they could have achieved in different circumstances.

As for Paul McGrath off the pitch I recently watched his appearance on a talkshow with Irish comedian Tommy Tiernan. I was surprised that he was a guest on the show and it turns out it was his first appearance on a talk show of that kind in 10 years. Yes he has done segments and interview in relation to games or news in football but he rarely if ever does interviews where his personal life would be discussed. He came across very well on the show and was very open and honest in answering some tough questions. He also explained how shy he was as a person and that can come across as weird or cold to some people. I recommend watching it, its a very interesting watch and a rare opportunity to get a bit of his story in his own words and not from the back of a newspaper.
 

ryansgirl

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Mixed feelings.

What he did to Mick McCarthy at the 2002 World Cup was unforgivable. OK so the "preparations" may have been not up to standard but you are there so get on with it. He let his team mates and country down badly. I think he blamed McCarthy for the problems but it was later identified that others were to blame for the poor preparations. Ireland did well and were judged to be the 9th best team without him. Imagine what could have happened if he had towed the line and just got on with things.
I was willing to give Big Mick some benefit of the doubt at that time until I started to read journalistic reports from sources that were not straight out of the Rep of Ireland management. This was before Keano's book where he dished it out. At the time of the World Cup I was stunned to read of his walk-out but then when the information came out I was not surprised.

Mick McCarthy accused Roy in front of the team of 'faking injury' - a huge insult and something that would have made Roy deck him had it happened in a different context away from football and the media. Instead of speaking privately to Roy and telling him 'I hear you about the lack of preparation and mistakes but I'd prefer it wasn't said directly to reporters', Mc Carthy choose to humiliate him in front of his team-mates and it snowballed from there.

That wasn't on and it wasn't what a professional manager does. It was pure provocation and Mick/his flunkies knew that. In American slang it was a classic 'bitchass' move by McCarthy and co.
 

ryansgirl

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As a Utd player legend no doubt! But as a person wherever he's been coaching , managing he's left under a cloud, he upsets to many people all the time.
He talks as a pundit very good, but then has to put his twopence worth in of something which really doesn't matter.
Watched a show few years back with him and Viera picking the best players they played with and Manager.

Viera picked the usual Arsenal players, Kean didn't pick Scholes Viera was bemused, and his Manager pick was Cloughie?

I was sour grapes and a dig, which Viera could clearly see. His status he has spoilt it himself, he's forthright as a man but can also be a fool to himself with what he comes out with at times. I'd still love him in our midfield mind.
I don't take any notice of the Cloughie choice - it was actually logical. Brian Clough took a small fish in English football, not a sleeping giant, to European Cup Finals and won twice.

Nottingham Forest as an English football club was hardly on any sporting radars and under Cloughie they won the English title, some other silverware and two European cups. An enormous and to this day unrivalled achievement for such a club. Thanks to Brian Clough and his second-in-charge Peter whatsit.
 

blue blue

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I was willing to give Big Mick some benefit of the doubt at that time until I started to read journalistic reports from sources that were not straight out of the Rep of Ireland management. This was before Keano's book where he dished it out. At the time of the World Cup I was stunned to read of his walk-out but then when the information came out I was not surprised.

Mick McCarthy accused Roy in front of the team of 'faking injury' - a huge insult and something that would have made Roy deck him had it happened in a different context away from football and the media. Instead of speaking privately to Roy and telling him 'I hear you about the lack of preparation and mistakes but I'd prefer it wasn't said directly to reporters', Mc Carthy choose to humiliate him in front of his team-mates and it snowballed from there.

That wasn't on and it wasn't what a professional manager does. It was pure provocation and Mick/his flunkies knew that. In American slang it was a classic 'bitchass' move by McCarthy and co.
I hear what you are saying but you can't let personal feelings get in front of performing for your country. If McCarthy did make a mistake Keane could just as easily had a quite word himself, but he chose let his country down.
 

Hughie77

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I don't take any notice of the Cloughie choice - it was actually logical. Brian Clough took a small fish in English football, not a sleeping giant, to European Cup Finals and won twice.

Nottingham Forest as an English football club was hardly on any sporting radars and under Cloughie they won the English title, some other silverware and two European cups. An enormous and to this day unrivalled achievement for such a club. Thanks to Brian Clough and his second-in-charge Peter whatsit.
Yes we all know that, but Keane didn't get anything with him.! So to pick him as the manager was bizarre. Keane won all his Medals at UTD under SAF. Peter Taylor was Cloughies number 2. Now if it was Martin Oniel, different story.? But he didn't play for SAF!
 

Foxbatt

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I hear what you are saying but you can't let personal feelings get in front of performing for your country. If McCarthy did make a mistake Keane could just as easily had a quite word himself, but he chose let his country down.
What quiet word? McCarthy sent him home straight from the meeting. Keane did not walk out. As ryansgirl said the Haarland affair also started because he accused of faking an injury while Keane was really injured and down on the floor. Everyone knows Roy Keane does not fake injuries.
Now to make matters worse he is saying that if Keane has stayed Ireland would not have got out of the group stages. He told this to SAF who thought Mick McCarthy was mad. Anyone who thinks a fit Roy Keane will not make any team better is bonkers.
 

Livvie

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I was willing to give Big Mick some benefit of the doubt at that time until I started to read journalistic reports from sources that were not straight out of the Rep of Ireland management. This was before Keano's book where he dished it out. At the time of the World Cup I was stunned to read of his walk-out but then when the information came out I was not surprised.

Mick McCarthy accused Roy in front of the team of 'faking injury' - a huge insult and something that would have made Roy deck him had it happened in a different context away from football and the media. Instead of speaking privately to Roy and telling him 'I hear you about the lack of preparation and mistakes but I'd prefer it wasn't said directly to reporters', Mc Carthy choose to humiliate him in front of his team-mates and it snowballed from there.

That wasn't on and it wasn't what a professional manager does. It was pure provocation and Mick/his flunkies knew that. In American slang it was a classic 'bitchass' move by McCarthy and co.
Couldn't have said it better.
 

Foxbatt

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To add to this Mick McCarthy said he went to Saipan for a holiday and for a blowout to go on the piss. I am surprised that Keane did not actually deck him.
 

Ecstatic

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He picked Ince! A fine player no doubt, but not in Scholes' league.
Not really the same positioning. Ince was more box-to-box.

I dont have the knowledge to compare ince/keane with scholes/keane from a tactical standpoint
 

Red For Ever

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Keane was fantastic for us on the pitch and in the dressing room

Can you imagine Keane and Lingard in the same dressing room
Can only imagine how that would go

When talking in the media he is pretty blunt and often he is right.
But he has also said things that I could not agree with and were out of order
Can’t imagine he gives a ***t about what me or anyone else thinks

Pretty sure we would be in a much better position with Keane the player and leader on the pitch and dressing room.

Keane the manager would have self destructed by now and taken a few with him, who probably deserve it
 

2cents

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Not really the same positioning. Ince was more box-to-box.

I dont have the knowledge to compare ince/keane with scholes/keane from a tactical standpoint
Yeah in fairness there’s an argument to be made that Keane-Ince was a better balanced partnership, as one could sit could while the other charged on, and they were both tough as nails. Keane-Scholes was a lot more gung-ho, May have cost us in Europe post-99.
 

Red For Ever

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Technically poor, tactically awful, negative leader; a butcher on the pitch and a toxic person.

The most overrated player ever. Only rated in the UK and his country.

Vieira on his bad days was twice the player and if Keane played today, he would play for a championship side.

He's a terrible manager too.

Did you ever see him live in a United shirt ?

I did many times,

Something in your manager quote, but the rest is not accurate.
 

Eric's Seagull

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Think Sir Alex summed Roy Keane the player up with this quote "It was the most emphatic display of selflessness I have seen on a football field. Pounding over every blade of grass, competing if he would rather die of exhaustion than lose, he inspired all around him. I felt such an honour to be associated with such a player.”on Roy Keane’s inspired performance in the 1999 Champions League semi-final against Juventus.
 

cyril C

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Think Sir Alex summed Roy Keane the player up with this quote "It was the most emphatic display of selflessness I have seen on a football field. Pounding over every blade of grass, competing if he would rather die of exhaustion than lose, he inspired all around him. I felt such an honour to be associated with such a player.”on Roy Keane’s inspired performance in the 1999 Champions League semi-final against Juventus.

What about the other quote - the hardest part of his body was his tongue.
 

Foxbatt

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Roy Keane the player and Roy Keane the Manager and Roy Keane the man are entirely different kettles of fish.