Who ought to be the next big managers in football?

gajender

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This might be a strange take but I reckon the money in the Premier League hasn't helped this. Too many promising but not yet ready managers are poached from abroad these days by middling English teams who are basically quick-sand because their tactical set-up doesn't fit a team that are also rans in their league. So it all comes down to catching fire with a mediocre team at the right time that a better vacancy arises, otherwise they end up treading water too long and the chance is gone.

Go back 15 years, pre-Chelsea Mourinho or pre-Liverpool Benitez were never going to be enticed by the projects at Bolton or Birmingham City or Portsmouth, but the comparative teams now can pay big money and offer a decent transfer kitty. The result is you get promising managers who might have matured elsewhere jumping to Britain to take over the 13th or 14th best team in the division in a competition were money is king. Recent managers like Marco Silva and Hassenhuttl have systems that are designed for better teams in the division but they can't stake their claim for those jobs managing at the bottom end of the table. There's obviously some exceptions.
You seriously can't be comparing Mourinho, Benitez to the likes of Marco Silva and Hassenhuttl.
About the bolded their equivalents in current climate won't be moving to Bolton , Birmingham profile clubs even now.
 

Champ

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Amorim will be a forgotten man again if Sporting don't win a trophy this season, such is the unforgiving manner of Sporting and Portuguese football!

Probably be laughed at here, but i do sincerley believe that Wayne Rooney has all the tendancies to be a top class manager, as long as he keeps his head in the right place off the pitch.

He has Derby playing some really good football against all odds, would love to see what he could do on a decent budget.

Valerien Ishmael will be at a bigger club soon also, absolute quality manager who plays aggresive high press football.

Scott Parker deserves a mention too, has got Bournemouth playing some lovely football and is well respected by players.
 

The White Pele

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I think it’s very tough in the modern game to get to the top as a manager. The managers at the top level have such sharp tactical thinking and ideas as well as having the strong personality required to lead and manage a dressing room of egos to take on and implement those ideas.

On top of that, I think the need to arrive at a big club with a reputation and a standing in the game to command respect is as great as ever. It’s not just the players, the club and the match going fans that have to be convinced anymore, it’s also the wider football audience. It’s so easy now for any doubts about someone’s credibility to become viral and for the manager to become a meme without even really putting a foot wrong. People on the internet then hanging onto every word of a press conference or post match interview to knock you with. That negativity has to transmit some doubts back into the dressing room.

It’s the reason I think someone like Potter might struggle at a club like United. I think managers like that need that interim step of winning at slightly lesser club. I think that’s why some clubs have been quick to go down the route of big name players with a more modest coaching CV because at least they are used to that constant pressure at the top and they command some respect in the game from their playing days.

I think going forwards the best managers will come from the ranks of the big clubs. Coaches that learn elite methods from the best coaches in the world and then go out to forge their own careers as a manager at lesser clubs, build up their own reputation in the game and work their way back to the top clubs.
 

stefan92

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I think going forwards the best managers will come from the ranks of the big clubs. Coaches that learn elite methods from the best coaches in the world and then go out to forge their own careers as a manager at lesser clubs, build up their own reputation in the game and work their way back to the top clubs.
At least in Germany I absolutely see this going on for a several years now. Clubs signing young talented coaches for their youth/reserve teams and promoting them to the first team if needed. A lot of old managers stopped being hired all the time once this became more usual.

Usually those coaches would also take some talents frim their teams to the first team and use them to get a bit of fresh air into struggling teams.

And then there is the Red Bull model. Owning several clubs and therefore show a clear path for your managers (Liefering -> Salzburg -> Leipzig). Several managers left RB before arriving in Leipzig, but that is mostly due to their succes and being hired by other bigger clubs in the meantime.
 

Cascarino

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If I were to guess how often a big club hired another clubs assistant coach as their head coach without a prior connection - ever - I'd guess zero.
I'm not talking about some trend though, I'm talking about - ever - in the history of the modern game.
Carlos Queiroz from Manchester United assistant to Real Madrid manager is the big one that comes to mind.
You actually had Kidd going to Blackburn as well, they were a decent sized club back then too.

Clubs obviously wanted some of that Ferguson magic.
 

do.ob

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Carlos Queiroz from Manchester United assistant to Real Madrid manager is the big one that comes to mind.
You actually had Kidd going to Blackburn as well, they were a decent sized club back then too.

Clubs obviously wanted some of that Ferguson magic.
That's two examples from decades ago. Meanwhile you regularly see that former players get put into coaching roles that their CV doesn't justify. I think it's pretty safe to assume in which category Arteta's appointment falls.
 

Cascarino

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That's two examples from decades ago. Meanwhile you regularly see that former players get put into coaching roles that their CV doesn't justify. I think it's pretty safe to assume in which category Arteta's appointment falls.
I'm not arguing that, having a playing career at a high level is massively advantageous.
I was just replying to your never guess.
 

Revan

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Who are the top managers today?

Pep, Klopp, Tuchel, Nagelsmann, Flick, Zidane and Ancelotti.

Second level- Poch, ETH, Mancini, Conte.
Nagelsmann is not in the first tier. Everyone you mentioned in the second tier is currently better and more established than him.

He might prove to be great though, considering how young he is.
 

Nickelodeon

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Feyenoord's Arne Slot deserves a shout.

Was in a title race with AZ before the season was cancelled due to covid and is now in a title race with Feyenoord (finished 5th last season under Advocaat)

His big game record is impressive:

DATUMWEDSTRIJDUITSLAG
26 september 2019Feyenoord - AZ0-3
27 oktober 2019PSV - AZ0-4
15 december 2019AZ - Ajax1-0
1 maart 2020Ajax - AZ0-2
19 september 2021PSV - Feyenoord0-4

He usually plays 4-2-3-1 with a high press and attacking football. He initially was an assistant but the players liked him so much he became the de facto head coach. He's bald and comfortable talking to the press.
Get him in
 

KirkDuyt

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Nah seriously speaking it's Arne Slot, he's the true bald Dutch master. Not that silly Ajax farmer.