Books The BOOK thread

Tiber

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Anyone interested in Star Wars books? Timothy Zhan writes Star Wars better than just about everyone, Heir To the Empire is the best story in of all of Star Wars imo. His entire Star Wars collection (all the way from the very recent 2021 Thrawn books to Heir to the Empire ) is available for 99p in the Kindle Deal of the Day

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/browse?i...636492652b16e&language=en_GB&ref_=as_li_ss_tl

Might not be much of a Star Wars book audience here, but well worth checking out if there is
 

hungrywing

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I'm going to cash in a decade-plus of all my "relative non-involvement in this thread" chips on this one book:

Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado-Perez

If you have testicles, read this. If you don't have testicles and/or had them/don't-have-them-but-want-them, read this (and hopefully for you it becomes a gateway into other big-data bias books).
 

b82REZ

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Listening to Klara and the Sun.

Wasn't really clicking with me in part 1, but part 2 is really starting to draw me in. Very sinister undertones.
 

Jippy

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I finished The Silence (Don DeLillo) recently, which feels like a very minor work his canon. I'd hesitate to call it even a novella, it's more like a short story.

The premise is that a bunch of people are watching the superbowl and the power goes out. Another strand follows two people on a plane who survive a crash landing.

Plot is subservient to analysis, which is usual in some of DD's recent books. In this case it talks about our feelings of being addicted to technology and explores what happens when that affordance is no longer granted.

I was struck most by the way people then begin to create their own language and entertainment forms. They're highly confused though, like they've just emerged out of Plato's cave.

It's got bad reviews but it's not a bad book IMO.

Very abstract but still human-focused, which is DD's great strength as a writer.
I just read this in one on a plane the other day and I was underwhelmed. It felt like DeLillo's pitched it as some portentous novella, stripping bare our fears and vulnerabilities, but to me it was more like he'd mixed a load of concerns of the day with a few conspiracy theories thrown. That Einstein-loving guy spouting stuff like 'facial recognition, bioweapons, chemtrails' to no-one in particular made him sound like a tinhat wearer using google, rather than offering any insight into the human psyche.
It was interesting framing it around the Superbowl and maybe as a slice of life snapshot it kind of works - the banality of most people's reaction to stuff- but I'm glad it was short.

Since finishing that I've been reading Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth, another American writer I'd somehow not gotten round to reading. Fair to say it's a rather different novel and very funny in parts, but quite brash and in your face.
 

Vidyoyo

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I just read this in one on a plane the other day and I was underwhelmed. It felt like DeLillo's pitched it as some portentous novella, stripping bare our fears and vulnerabilities, but to me it was more like he'd mixed a load of concerns of the day with a few conspiracy theories thrown. That Einstein-loving guy spouting stuff like 'facial recognition, bioweapons, chemtrails' to no-one in particular made him sound like a tinhat wearer using google, rather than offering any insight into the human psyche.
It was interesting framing it around the Superbowl and maybe as a slice of life snapshot it kind of works - the banality of most people's reaction to stuff- but I'm glad it was short.

Since finishing that I've been reading Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth, another American writer I'd somehow not gotten round to reading. Fair to say it's a rather different novel and very funny in parts, but quite brash and in your face.
Have you read Endzone? That book basically revolves around Am Football and leads with the analogy its similar to the make-up of American society. It's not a wholly complete novel but it's very funny, like White Noise, and probably my favourite of DeLillo's. Certainly the only one I've read twice.

I tried to read Portnoy's Complaint about a decade ago and couldn't get into it. I've not stepped into Roth since, which might be an error.
 

Jippy

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Have you read Endzone? That book basically revolves around Am Football and leads with the analogy its similar to the make-up of American society. It's not a wholly complete novel but it's very funny, like White Noise, and probably my favourite of DeLillo's. Certainly the only one I've read twice.

I tried to read Portnoy's Complaint about a decade ago and couldn't get into it. I've not stepped into Roth since, which might be an error.
That my first DeLillo. I think I might have a break before I read another, given I was underwhelmed by The Silence, but I'll have a look at those two, thanks.

With Portnoy's Complaint, I can kind of see why the parts where he is a kid might be a struggle to get into a bit and maybe feel somewhat juvenile. It is somewhat one-paced in the sense that it's the book equivalent of shouty, but it's also quite funny in places and worth giving another shot at some point.

After stupidly packing my books in sea rather than air freight I need to order some because I'm two thirds of the way through Hanif Kureishi's The Black Album and don't feel like reading Dickens' David Copperfiled, but they are way more expensive in Singapore versus the UK:(