The vaccines | AZ approved in UK - Pfizer/Moderna rollout underway

When will you take a covid vaccine?

  • As part of a covid trial

  • When it's approved/available for my age/risk group

  • 6 months after the bulk of my age/risk group

  • At least a year and I want to choose the brand

  • Only if I have to - for work or travel etc

  • Ten years +


Results are only viewable after voting.

Withnail

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Or a cyclical view would be the others have realised someone is about to release one and they need to rush theirs so they can get a big slice of the financial pie too!
That's a bit of a roundabout way of looking at things
 

Withnail

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The problems with these stats is there is nothing to suggest these people wouldn’t have died or had these problems without the vaccine either.
You'll probably find if you pick any 10m people or maybe any in the demographic who will get the initial vaccine that is true.
 

jojojo

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The problems with these stats is there is nothing to suggest these people wouldn’t have died or had these problems without the vaccine either.
That's the point - that's what will happen without covid and without a vaccine to an average group of 10m people in the US. That just normal life. But those normal deaths/illnesses will get used as ammo on Facebook and Twitter etc by the antivaxers and conspiracy theorists.

I'm just reminding people about the sheer number of "my friend's mum, who's a nurse in her fifties had a stroke a week after taking the vaccine," stories we're going to see.

Monitoring will be close, the statisticians will be watching intently.
 

Pogue Mahone

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That's the point - that's what will happen without covid and without a vaccine to an average group of 10m people in the US. That just normal life. But those normal deaths/illnesses will get used as ammo on Facebook and Twitter etc by the antivaxers and conspiracy theorists.

I'm just reminding people about the sheer number of "my friend's mum, who's a nurse in her fifties had a stroke a week after taking the vaccine," stories we're going to see.

Monitoring will be close, the statisticians will be watching intently.
Goes without saying that the counter-anecdotes about friends mums stroking out a week after catching covid won’t get as much traction (despite there being a more plausible cause and effect in the latter scenario)
 

Infra-red

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Fantastic news and a huge achievement to get a vaccine out this year. Human beings aren't so bad when we work together towards a singular goal. Let the Nobel prizes flow!
 

Cloud7

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Fantastic news and a huge achievement to get a vaccine out this year. Human beings aren't so bad when we work together towards a singular goal. Let the Nobel prizes flow!
Makes you think about where society could really be if there was cooperation on more things
 

cyberman

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Fantastic news and a huge achievement to get a vaccine out this year. Human beings aren't so bad when we work together towards a singular goal. Let the Nobel prizes flow!
Honestly, can we not put this much effort into eradicating cancer etc now when the push is there?
 

ha_rooney

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Excellent news & great work by all involved in getting to this stage. Now let’s hope we can roll out the vaccines & get to some level of normalcy by summer.
 

Zlatan 7

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With regards to this poll I suppose it depends on what the vaccine does. If it stops you carrying and spreading to others, of course I’d get it as soon as possible just so I could visit family and protect vulnerable.

if the vaccine only stops me getting too ill but I still catch the virus and able to carry and pass it, I don’t see much point in rushing to get it.

I’ll wait until they are actually released with info instead of guessing and trying to make head or tail of all the gossip
 

Jacko21

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Great news!

Also good to see that Clinically Extremely Vulnerable people have been moved up the prioritisation list.
 

sammsky1

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jojojo

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Any idea when they anticipate the first phase will end?
It depends...

End of Q1 maybe - based on likely vaccine availability and assuming no major distribution failures or safety/other pauses. If AstraZeneca gets approved, that's a reasonable timeline. If it doesn't, or if it gets delayed awaiting further data, then we will struggle to get enough Pfizer to complete Phase 1 that quickly. We're at the front of the Pfizer queue for now, but won't stay there, and Moderna is unlikely to arrive in sufficient quantity until Q2 at earliest.

Novavax is another potential gamechanger, but they're still getting approval for their (fullscale) manufacturing procedures in the US, in order to start their Phase 3 trials in the US/Mexico. They are expected to report data from their UK/South Africa Phase 3 in the next couple of months, and may turn out to have a really good vaccine (high efficacy, high safety, fridge storage) but may not be able to produce at high volume until later in 2021 (and maybe only then if a bigger company takes them/the vaccine over).
 

Chief123

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That's the point - that's what will happen without covid and without a vaccine to an average group of 10m people in the US. That just normal life. But those normal deaths/illnesses will get used as ammo on Facebook and Twitter etc by the antivaxers and conspiracy theorists.

I'm just reminding people about the sheer number of "my friend's mum, who's a nurse in her fifties had a stroke a week after taking the vaccine," stories we're going to see.

Monitoring will be close, the statisticians will be watching intently.
Sorry I misunderstood your initial post.

But yeah the anti-vaxxers who come out in force sighting cases where someone has got autism after having a vaccine is stupid. It’s as if they expect a person to be completely immune from anything if they don’t take a vaccine. There will always be people who get illnesses after having the vaccine. Not because of the vaccine but because it was naturally going to happen.
 

Wolverine

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We'll see throughout the country leisure centres converted into mass vaccination centres, not sure where they'll get staff form to operate there
Maybe army, maybe health professionals. Leicester racecourse near where I live is being set up
https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/...cester-racecourse-being-prepped-covid-4755021

The specifications for this vaccination programme as a direct enhanced service is logistically too difficult for primary care to set up in the short term from what I've seen so I don't think many GPs will be signing up to deliver this, although primary care is well placed usually to do it but needs more time.

I'm not too personally worried about anti-vaxx sentiment, the demographic most worried about (over 65s, comorbidities) have all been telling me during their sessions for flu jabs that they'll trust the process and get the vaccine as soon as. Think hesitancy might be prevalent among the young but in the longer run many of those who have adopted vaccine hesitancy as like a counter-cultural way of thinking/personality trait will give in and get it especially with pressures from private companies for needing it. I think hardcore anti-vaxxers still make up a small, if loud proportion. There is work to be done to advocate for it to the non-crazies though
 

djembatheking

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With regards to this poll I suppose it depends on what the vaccine does. If it stops you carrying and spreading to others, of course I’d get it as soon as possible just so I could visit family and protect vulnerable.

if the vaccine only stops me getting too ill but I still catch the virus and able to carry and pass it, I don’t see much point in rushing to get it.

I’ll wait until they are actually released with info instead of guessing and trying to make head or tail of all the gossip
So does the vaccine stop you catching the virus and stops you then passing it on or does it just prevent you from being really ill.
If it is the latter then it is great for the older and vulnerable but for younger folk it would be fairly pointless. Surely there will be clear explanation of what protection it gives before rolling it out as it would be quite dangerous initially if it just stopped you being really ill but were still contagious as vaccinated people that have been extra careful staying in and such would no doubt drop their guard.
 

jojojo

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So does the vaccine stop you catching the virus and stops you then passing it on or does it just prevent you from being really ill.
If it is the latter then it is great for the older and vulnerable but for younger folk it would be fairly pointless. Surely there will be clear explanation of what protection it gives before rolling it out as it would be quite dangerous initially if it just stopped you being really ill but were still contagious as vaccinated people that have been extra careful staying in and such would no doubt drop their guard.
It's an unknown at the moment, but the Phase3 studies are being extended to monitor that, as well as looking at how long the protection lasts. It's also something that is relatively easy to test in these initial groups (healthcare workers and carehome residents/staff) where you can use weekly routine testing.

And yes, if it gives us millions of people who consider themselves immune, whilst increasing the pool of asymptomatic/minor symptoms infection carriers, then it might actually help push up infection rates. Hence why nothing will change overnight on the social distancing front. It's part of why the UK priority list is driven by things like highest medical risk. Not many over 80s in residential care will be heading out on a pub crawl down in the nearest student area - certainly not in mid-winter.
 

Zlatan 7

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So does the vaccine stop you catching the virus and stops you then passing it on or does it just prevent you from being really ill.
If it is the latter then it is great for the older and vulnerable but for younger folk it would be fairly pointless. Surely there will be clear explanation of what protection it gives before rolling it out as it would be quite dangerous initially if it just stopped you being really ill but were still contagious as vaccinated people that have been extra careful staying in and such would no doubt drop their guard.
According to this BBC article they don’t know yet.

“We do not know if the vaccine stops you catching and spreading the virus or just stops you from getting ill. We also don't know how protective the vaccine is in different age groups.”

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/explainers-54880084
 

tombombadil

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One thing I think many people need to remind themselves is that this is not the end. It is only the beginning of the next phase, which hopefully will be the final phase. Depending on country, this process will take anywhere between months up to more than a year to complete. Even for all the first wave countries (the rich and powerful countries), they will probably need at least until mid of 2021. And that is assuming everything goes smoothly and all vaccines are successful and ramps up without problems. So in a best case scenario, we're looking at 2H of 2021 for any semblance normalcy. Which means even for these countries, you still need to practice caution and live with the pandemic protocols for a very long time. And if you live in a small country, tough luck. Probably end 2021 or 1H 2022.
 

jojojo

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We'll see throughout the country leisure centres converted into mass vaccination centres, not sure where they'll get staff form to operate there
Maybe army, maybe health professionals. Leicester racecourse near where I live is being set up
https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/...cester-racecourse-being-prepped-covid-4755021

The specifications for this vaccination programme as a direct enhanced service is logistically too difficult for primary care to set up in the short term from what I've seen so I don't think many GPs will be signing up to deliver this, although primary care is well placed usually to do it but needs more time.

I'm not too personally worried about anti-vaxx sentiment, the demographic most worried about (over 65s, comorbidities) have all been telling me during their sessions for flu jabs that they'll trust the process and get the vaccine as soon as. Think hesitancy might be prevalent among the young but in the longer run many of those who have adopted vaccine hesitancy as like a counter-cultural way of thinking/personality trait will give in and get it especially with pressures from private companies for needing it. I think hardcore anti-vaxxers still make up a small, if loud proportion. There is work to be done to advocate for it to the non-crazies though
Manchester's first mass vaccination centre is expected to be on the Etihad campus :eek:

Salford Royal Hospital are expected to be the first Manchester centre to kick off next week - targeted at healthcare staff initially.
https://www.manchestereveningnews.c...etihad-covid-mass-vaccination-centre-19375049

On the antivaxxer front. I think the system will have more demand than supply for the first few months. One worry I have are that some groups at high risk will be amongst those who don't take the "first appointment offered" approach - and that needs some real targeted community work. The other worry is that we have to get people back for Jab #2, which may prove a bigger problem than Jab #1. Particularly if we're using these mass vaccination centres (miles away!) rather than local services. The follow-up on missed appointments will need to be really slick.
 

Massive Spanner

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Manchester's first mass vaccination centre is expected to be on the Etihad campus :eek:

Salford Royal Hospital are expected to be the first Manchester centre to kick off next week - targeted at healthcare staff initially.
https://www.manchestereveningnews.c...etihad-covid-mass-vaccination-centre-19375049

On the antivaxxer front. I think the system will have more demand than supply for the first few months. One worry I have are that some groups at high risk will be amongst those who don't take the "first appointment offered" approach - and that needs some real targeted community work. The other worry is that we have to get people back for Jab #2, which may prove a bigger problem than Jab #1. Particularly if we're using these mass vaccination centres (miles away!) rather than local services. The follow-up on missed appointments will need to be really slick.
At least the Etihad will finally fill up I suppose.
 

LawCharltonBest

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INJECT ME IN THE EYE SLUTS

Not read the articles as I’m working..

When would a fit and healthy 30 year old who isn’t a key worker be able to be vaccinated?
 

F-Red

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Fantastic news and a huge achievement to get a vaccine out this year. Human beings aren't so bad when we work together towards a singular goal. Let the Nobel prizes flow!
Makes you think about where society could really be if there was cooperation on more things
Honestly, can we not put this much effort into eradicating cancer etc now when the push is there?
Just shows that when the collaboration and funding is there, the speed of scientific advances can be powerful.
 

Smores

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Feck the Brexit festival we should have a week long bank holiday when this gets rolled out to the general population.
 

bsCallout

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Can someone explain to me why you would take the vaccine if you were under 40, assuming everyone that is over 40 and also those who are compromised do so?
 

Klopper76

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I'm in Canada but have a British passport. Could fly back to get it.

Sounds like Canada won't have it for a while.
 

Maluco

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Can someone explain to me why you would take the vaccine if you were under 40, assuming everyone that is over 40 and also those who are compromised do so?
- To aid in halting the spread of the virus and participate in the fight against it.
- Because we don’t know how long anyone has immunity.
- To protect friends and family members.
- To eliminate the chance that you are one of the fatalities under 40 (they do happen)
- To help provide better statistics and improve the technology and medicine behind vaccines
- To avoid health difficulties associated with the virus.

Many, many reasons to be honest.
 

FlawlessThaw

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I'm in Canada but have a British passport. Could fly back to get it.

Sounds like Canada won't have it for a while.
When do you expect Canada to have it? I don't see the masses in the UK having it any time soon.
 

bsCallout

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- To aid in halting the spread of the virus and participate in the fight against it.
- Because we don’t know how long anyone has immunity.
- To protect friends and family members.
- To eliminate the chance that you are one of the fatalities under 40 (they do happen)
- To help provide better statistics and improve the technology and medicine behind vaccines
- To avoid health difficulties associated with the virus.

Many, many reasons to be honest.
If we accept those under 40 are at a very low risk I still don't know that these hold up.

Protect family & friends? - They're vaccinated.
Avoid health difficulties - Very slim risk (All vaccines carry SOME risk)
Halting of the spread - Numbers are already lowering, if all those previously mentioned are vaccinated then that halts the spread. Let alone those already previously infected.
Risk of fatality under 40 - VERY VERY VERY few without comorbidities have died from Covid.
 

Pexbo

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If we accept those under 40 are at a very low risk I still don't know that these hold up.

Protect family & friends? - They're vaccinated.
Avoid health difficulties - Very slim risk (All vaccines carry SOME risk)
Halting of the spread - Numbers are already lowering, if all those previously mentioned are vaccinated then that halts the spread. Let alone those already previously infected.
Risk of fatality under 40 - VERY VERY VERY few without comorbidities have died from Covid.
The vaccine will be safer than the virus.
 

11101

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Can someone explain to me why you would take the vaccine if you were under 40, assuming everyone that is over 40 and also those who are compromised do so?
To protect those who are at risk who might catch it from you. Not everybody can be vaccinated, and older people generally don't respond as well to vaccines anyway. The sooner everybody is vaccinated the sooner life gets back to normal.

Anyway, you wont be asked to take it until we know for sure it prevents transmission and we know much more about the longer term side effects.
 

Maluco

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It is basically summed up in the post above. The vaccine greatly reduces the risk for anyone of adult age.

My wife had the virus and is fine. My cousin had the virus two months ago and is currently in hospital with quite serious problems in her lungs.

Long Covid and the health problems associated with it are a very real thing that we are only really starting to understand.

If we want to stop thousands of young people suffer from debilitating injury and health difficulties, it needs to be a universal effort.

Young people are still dying and still suffering, older people and vulnerable people could still be very much at risk, and that will continue to be the case until society as a whole does their part.
 

jojojo

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If we accept those under 40 are at a very low risk I still don't know that these hold up.

Protect family & friends? - They're vaccinated.
Avoid health difficulties - Very slim risk (All vaccines carry SOME risk)
Halting of the spread - Numbers are already lowering, if all those previously mentioned are vaccinated then that halts the spread. Let alone those already previously infected.
Risk of fatality under 40 - VERY VERY VERY few without comorbidities have died from Covid.
It depends. If it stops people passing the virus on, then it makes a big impact.

There will be people who can't take it - that group will initially include pregnant women, some cancer patients and various others with auto-immune diseases. They will need people to take it for the benefit of the whole community.

Maybe it's not your partner, brother, sister we're talking about - maybe it's a workmate, or the person you're sat next to on the bus or in the pub.

As to just your personal risk - yes, it's a calculation. The calculation is that it's likely that the risk of death/longterm illness is higher from the virus than the vaccine. Certainly by the time anyone is encouraging reluctant under 40s to take it, we'll know a lot about the relative risk - so you can look at it then.