Who had or has the hardest shot?

David Haberger

New Member
Newbie
Joined
May 24, 2018
Messages
8
I can easily use any other example. The amount of force applied stays the same from the moment of the contact, but it doesn’t instantly transfer into speed. The ball’s velocity rises up for a bit (about 0.5 seconds) after the ball had been hit before it begins to decrease.

No it does not. The force is zero after the ball leaves the foot.
 

MikeeMike

New Member
Newbie
Joined
Oct 7, 2017
Messages
404
No it does not. The force is zero after the ball leaves the foot.
At last some sense.

Just going to go with the comedy and quote.

“The balls velocity rises up for a bit”.
“acceleration is velocity/time – until it reaches its peak speed and the forces that slow him down begin to prevail”
“the record books state that an effort against Chelsea on 27th February 1997 reached 97.9 mph.”
 

harms

Shining Star of Paektu Mountain
Staff
Joined
Apr 8, 2014
Messages
21,877
Location
Moscow
At last some sense.

Just going to go with the comedy and quote.

“The balls velocity rises up for a bit”.
“acceleration is velocity/time – until it reaches its peak speed and the forces that slow him down begin to prevail”
“the record books state that an effort against Chelsea on 27th February 1997 reached 97.9 mph.”
I may very well be a complete and utter idiot on this particular point, although I still think that the main issue is the translation (there's potential & kinetic energy, velocity, acceleration, speed etc., I'm sure that I can mix those terms up in English). What would be way more productive though is to prove me wrong using physics instead of going the way you went.
 

David Haberger

New Member
Newbie
Joined
May 24, 2018
Messages
8
I may very well be a complete and utter idiot on this particular point, although I still think that the main issue is the translation (there's potential & kinetic energy, velocity, acceleration, speed etc., I'm sure that I can mix those terms up in English). What would be way more productive though is to prove me wrong using physics instead of going the way you went.
I already did. I'm an engineer so I know a little bit about this stuff. As long as force is applied to the ball it accelerates. No force = no acceleration = constant velocity. After the ball leaves the foot there is nothing that accelerates the ball. Which means that the ball isn't getting any faster with time. Why do you believe, that the force applied is constant during the flight?
 

Bestietom

Full Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Messages
6,220
Location
Ireland
Looks like just 4 of us old enough to remember Lorimers shot power.
Yes, we are letting people know we are OAPs. Think they measured it as the hardest shot ever. Am I right..
 

giorno

Full Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2016
Messages
17,312
Supports
Real Madrid
I may very well be a complete and utter idiot on this particular point, although I still think that the main issue is the translation (there's potential & kinetic energy, velocity, acceleration, speed etc., I'm sure that I can mix those terms up in English). What would be way more productive though is to prove me wrong using physics instead of going the way you went.
Air friction does not accelerate an object. It decelerates it

It is simple physics: there is no force acting on the ball to accelerate it after it leaves the foot. Hence *all* of its kinetic energy comes from the kick. Hence a shot reaches top speed immediately after contact, and decelerates from there as air friction comes into play
 

roonster09

Hercule Poirot of the scouting world
Scout
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
26,105
Kolarov should be up there among the top in last 10-15 years.
 

harms

Shining Star of Paektu Mountain
Staff
Joined
Apr 8, 2014
Messages
21,877
Location
Moscow
Air friction does not accelerate an object. It decelerates it

It is simple physics: there is no force acting on the ball to accelerate it after it leaves the foot. Hence *all* of its kinetic energy comes from the kick. Hence a shot reaches top speed immediately after contact, and decelerates from there as air friction comes into play
Of course it doesn't. I was probably confused, as I was sure that an impact of a hit (and a transfer of energy) gives the body acceleration and not simply makes it move at top speed instantly. Of course, the time difference between a body reaching full speed as a result of rapidly reducing acceleration and the immediate transfer of a maximum speed/velocity/whatever is minuscule when we're talking about a player hitting a ball, but I was still sure that it was a thing.
 

MikeeMike

New Member
Newbie
Joined
Oct 7, 2017
Messages
404
I may very well be a complete and utter idiot on this particular point, although I still think that the main issue is the translation (there's potential & kinetic energy, velocity, acceleration, speed etc., I'm sure that I can mix those terms up in English). What would be way more productive though is to prove me wrong using physics instead of going the way you went.
Apologies if the translation muddled it. But , a football cannot speed up(accelerate) after contact with foot.
I admit I’m teasing a bit but when I see quotes of 200+ mph I have to correct.
Best Regards
 

harms

Shining Star of Paektu Mountain
Staff
Joined
Apr 8, 2014
Messages
21,877
Location
Moscow
I already did. I'm an engineer so I know a little bit about this stuff. As long as force is applied to the ball it accelerates. No force = no acceleration = constant velocity. After the ball leaves the foot there is nothing that accelerates the ball. Which means that the ball isn't getting any faster with time. Why do you believe, that the force applied is constant during the flight?
Yeah, it wasn't addressed to you. I was wrong then, thanks for the explanation. I didn't believe that it was constant but I thought that the transfer of power didn't happen immediately.
 

giggs-beckham

Clueless
Joined
Sep 9, 2007
Messages
5,000
The Ronny Heberson goal claims 131mph which is 64yds per second. As the free kick was on edge of box (18yrd line) the shot would have get from boot to goal in 0.2 seconds. Not remotely possible.
I was right to be skeptical then.
 

Teja

Full Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2014
Messages
853
Location
Boston, MA
Riise whacked them pretty hard during his time at Liverpool, remember players just falling like flies after getting hit by his FKs.
 

JNicholas

New Member
Newbie
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
93
Supports
Arsenal
I don't have the privileges to post media yet but please look up Hugo Almeida's free kick for FC Porto away at Inter Milan.

Unbelievable power.
 

Mr. MUJAC

Manchester United Youth Historian
Joined
Sep 19, 2005
Messages
5,699
Location
Walter Crickmer started it all...
They did some experiments in the 1960's and the two hardest strikers of the ball were Peter Lorimer of Leeds and David Herd of Manchester United.

Bobby Charlton was up there but Herd's striking was faster.

Meanwhile in the 1950's, Duncan Edwards hit the ball so hard in games he broke the goal post once in one game and burst two balls in another.

Of course that was with the heavier case balls. He must have had some power the lad.
 

paulscholes18

Full Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2013
Messages
15,766
Saw Man City vs West Ham, Kyle Walker had a shot, would have liked to see the speed of that
 

B20

HEY EVERYONE I IGNORE SOMEONE LOOK AT ME
Joined
Aug 23, 2003
Messages
24,604
Location
Disney Land
Supports
Liverpool
My first thoughts were Koeman and Yeboah.

I am sure others have hit as hard shots occasionally or when blammming it into row z.

But I can't think of anyone else who could hit it with precision with the kind of rocket power they could put into it. Maybe Adriano?