Alexis Mac Allister | Liverpool watch

amolbhatia50k

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He’s doing alright in the Argentinian side…

Why though, does his name have a gap between the ‘Mac’ and the ‘Allister’?

It really annoys me!
Argentina aren't as good as a top club. They have players like De Paul starting!

:lol: True thats very odd
 

B20

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Speaking of names, "De Paul" aggravates me. It just sounds unbelievably pretentious. Should have been a bicycle rider or something, not a half-decent midfield slugger.
 

DWelbz19

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Where exactly does he fit for a domestic “bigger” club? It’s working well for Argentina in this hybrid almost Simeone like midfield 4 in a 442 with him sort of playing as a half winger half CM, and I think Brighton love a positionally ambiguous XI, but I’m not quite sure what his best position is.
 

Mr Pigeon

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He’s doing alright in the Argentinian side…

Why though, does his name have a gap between the ‘Mac’ and the ‘Allister’?

It really annoys me!
Yeah but it's technically more accurate than the names that have the two combined.
 

Red the Bear

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Yeah but it's technically more accurate than the names that have the two combined.
It means son right?
Like the son of allister? Always found it strange how it's used in the last name, doesn't make much sense after the first one who used it.
 

daba

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Liverpool can’t sign everyone !

Every post about a midfielder on here has “I think he’ll end up at Liverpool” in it. You’d think they can play 22 players instead of 11.
I probably should have expanded my point a little as I can see how my message might come across as negative.

I simply don’t think there’s any way Liverpool get both Jude and Enzo (or potentially either given the interest) and Klopp has had good success building a side by poaching top talent from within the Prem. Prem talents from lower clubs are more reliable comm no pared to say the Portuguese league where they might take a season or two to fully adapt (see Nunez - although there are exceptions like Bruno and Luis Diaz).

Although their midfield is in need of serious repair there is very little money expected to come from existing players, so I just don’t see how Liverpool afford both or even one of them.£50-60m on Mac Allister seems far more realistic.
 
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Nick7

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It means son right?
Like the son of allister? Always found it strange how it's used in the last name, doesn't make much sense after the first one who used it.
“Son of” is extremely common in surnames, not sure if it’s just a European thing though. One commonly used in English is Johnson. Son of John.
 

weetee

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Read a long interview with his dad, seem like very nice and humble folk. Father played for Boca Juniors and alongside Maradona, son eventually wins the WC together with Messi. Quite the story.
 

jeff_goldblum

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It means son right?
Like the son of allister? Always found it strange how it's used in the last name, doesn't make much sense after the first one who used it.
Traditionally it would have changed generation by generation, or switched to the O' form, which means "male descendent of"
 

Dans

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Read a long interview with his dad, seem like very nice and humble folk. Father played for Boca Juniors and alongside Maradona, son eventually wins the WC together with Messi. Quite the story.
I remember seeing his Dad play:

 

MadMike

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He's quite decent all around, but not really exceptional at anything.

Plus, we can't be having a player with that surname like that. It's triggering.
 

Nick7

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Ó/Uí comes from Úa in Old Irish, which means grandson, but is also used to refer to a male descendent more generally.
Yeah thanks for the clarification, I just didn’t want to get too detailed in the differences. More just pointing out that Ó and Mc/Mac have differences and thought that was the easiest way of saying it.
 

jeff_goldblum

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That makes sense , I wonder why the O' form isn't used more.
Most Irish families wouldn't have had a formal surname until relatively recently (last 150 years), most people had a given name and then a patronymic name consisting of Mac/Nic (male/female) + their father's name.

When the British started taking censuses and asking for surnames, the man of the house would give his, and as far as the British state was concerned, British naming customs applied. Whatever name the father gave would stick as that family's name in perpetuity and be passed down instead of updating. It also wiped out the female form of the patronymic names (Nic for Mac and Ní for Ó/Uí) as in British custom daughters also get the father's exact surname.

The Ó/Uí thing historically was generally reserved for nobility who could (or wanted to) trace their lineage back to a famous ancestor, or to people who had lived in a certain area for a very long time. For example the Uí Néill traced their lineage back to Niall of the Nine Hostages and used the Ó/Uí/Ní form to show it off.
 

Red the Bear

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Most Irish families wouldn't have had a formal surname until relatively recently (last 150 years), most people had a given name and then a patronymic name consisting of Mac/Nic (male/female) + their father's name.

When the British started taking censuses and asking for surnames, the man of the house would give his, and as far as the British state was concerned, British naming customs applied. Whatever name the father gave would stick as that family's name in perpetuity and be passed down instead of updating. It also wiped out the female form of the patronymic names (Nic for Mac and Ní for Ó/Uí) as in British custom daughters also get the father's exact surname.

The Ó/Uí thing historically was generally reserved for nobility who could (or wanted to) trace their lineage back to a famous ancestor, or to people who had lived in a certain area for a very long time. For example the Uí Néill traced their lineage back to Niall of the Nine Hostages and used the Ó/Uí/Ní form to show it off.
Thanks for the detailed answer, love this stuff.

The more modern or British in this case of way of doing things is certainly more convenient but I guess it's a shame to lose that piece of tradition.
 

Righteous Steps

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Most Irish families wouldn't have had a formal surname until relatively recently (last 150 years), most people had a given name and then a patronymic name consisting of Mac/Nic (male/female) + their father's name.

When the British started taking censuses and asking for surnames, the man of the house would give his, and as far as the British state was concerned, British naming customs applied. Whatever name the father gave would stick as that family's name in perpetuity and be passed down instead of updating. It also wiped out the female form of the patronymic names (Nic for Mac and Ní for Ó/Uí) as in British custom daughters also get the father's exact surname.

The Ó/Uí thing historically was generally reserved for nobility who could (or wanted to) trace their lineage back to a famous ancestor, or to people who had lived in a certain area for a very long time. For example the Uí Néill traced their lineage back to Niall of the Nine Hostages and used the Ó/Uí/Ní form to show it off.
Great insight.
 

IFC 1905

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“Son of” is extremely common in surnames, not sure if it’s just a European thing though. One commonly used in English is Johnson. Son of John.
In spanish the "ez" finishing at last names has the same meaning

Fernandez, Martinez, Alvarez and in my case..Jimenez

Son of Fernando, Martin, Alvaro, Jimeno, etc.
 

Nick7

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In spanish the "ez" finishing at last names has the same meaning

Fernandez, Martinez, Alvarez and in my case..Jimenez

Son of Fernando, Martin, Alvaro, Jimeno, etc.
Oh! That makes total sense yet I never realised. Thank you!
 

AshamanKingpin

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He’s been fantastic the whole cup. As an EPL fan, feel proud.
 

HILLSIDE

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In spanish the "ez" finishing at last names has the same meaning

Fernandez, Martinez, Alvarez and in my case..Jimenez

Son of Fernando, Martin, Alvaro, Jimeno, etc.
I think this is common in many languages and cultures. Arabic use"bin", Turkish "oğlu", French "fils" all mean "son of! Given there are only a handful of root languages that modern languages derive from I'm not surprised.
 

Whywhywhy

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May the season of overrating every World Cup winner begin. This guy is above average player at best.
No way. Outstanding in under 20 national team. Having big success in Brighton along Caicedo (great worldcup too) and Trossard. Above multimillion fraud Chelsea in EPL in the present.
 

Oranges038

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So can we all agree that Ireland 9% (1/11) won the World Cup?
Only of England get the same for 06 on account of Perotta. And we couldn't have that now, could we?

He's been one of the players of the tournament for me, played his heart out in every game and there were some qaulity moments mixed in. He has also been very good for Brighton. He'll probably get a move in the summer, he seems like he'd suit Klopps style at Liverpool.
 

Gio

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So can we all agree that Ireland 9% (1/11) won the World Cup?
Only if we agree to split the 9% with us in recognition of his shared Scottish and Irish ancestry. I mean this bloke must have Scottish blood coursing through his veins.

 

The Corinthian

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I think this is common in many languages and cultures. Arabic use"bin", Turkish "oğlu", French "fils" all mean "son of! Given there are only a handful of root languages that modern languages derive from I'm not surprised.
I think it's 'gan' in Turkish? Erdogan, Gundogan where 'gan' is son of?

and I'm sure it's similar in Russian/Polish with the 'ski/sky' suffix - son of / belongs to etc.
 

Shinjch

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Would be happy with him or his partner at Brighton. Both would be different and able partners to Casemiro.
 

lynchie

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I think it's 'gan' in Turkish? Erdogan, Gundogan where 'gan' is son of?

and I'm sure it's similar in Russian/Polish with the 'ski/sky' suffix - son of / belongs to etc.
It's -ovich in Russian - you see a lot of it being used in those Russian talk shows - Putin is referred to as "Vladimir Vladimirovich", etc.
 

The Corinthian

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It's -ovich in Russian - you see a lot of it being used in those Russian talk shows - Putin is referred to as "Vladimir Vladimirovich", etc.
Ah yes - you're right.
 

JJ12

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May the season of overrating every World Cup winner begin. This guy is above average player at best.
Yeah it’s not as if we’ve seen him play in a big league like the Premi…. Wait a minute
 

Rodgerzzz

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“Son of” is extremely common in surnames, not sure if it’s just a European thing though. One commonly used in English is Johnson. Son of John.
Questions raised about the lineage of anybody with the surname Dickson... Richardson is already around so there must be a reason for the distinction :smirk:
 

General_Elegancia

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May the season of overrating every World Cup winner begin. This guy is above average player at best.
He is only 23 years old and has a lot of time to develop himself. This season he has been impressive to both club and Argentina. He has developed himself a lot during the two seasons.

 

bond19821982

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Such a brilliant little player. So impressive. Enzo is the best midfielder but everyone knows that and pretty much every big club will be behind him.

I would be happy with this guy too.