Club Ownership | INEOS responsible for the football side

Judas

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Where the grass is greener.
Also, what happened to developing a game model and then finding a manager that fits that vision? The managerial names touted are as random as any.
This....does puzzle me as well. Because, all the names are the exact blokes I think Woody and the gang would be after. There's nothing even remotely obscure, or outside the box. A teenage boy who casually watches football could come up with our managerial targets. It's just not inspiring.

I'd like to think there's a bit more thinking and looking further afield going on behind the scenes, and what we're seeing is mostly just media guff.
 

Pexbo

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This....does puzzle me as well. Because, all the names are the exact blokes I think Woody and the gang would be after. There's nothing even remotely obscure, or outside the box. A teenage boy who casually watches football could come up with our managerial targets. It's just not inspiring.

I'd like to think there's a bit more thinking and looking further afield going on behind the scenes, and what we're seeing is mostly just media guff.
It’s exactly what I said weeks ago. It seems like our number one requirement is “unemployed” or “likely to be unemployed soon”.
 

Escobar

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Why is everyone shitting their pants based on a few tweets? The season ended like a week ago, I see no reason to panic already.
And funny how things are seen now as negative, like the appoibtment of Ashworth, as if they can control Newcastles behaviour and we all know there is a legal case ongoing
 

MDFC Manager

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Running a football club is very different from other business endeavours.

The idea that there is evidence of fantastic work seems far fetched. What evidence?
So far they have made a massive mess out of the manager situation.

And the reason people are worried isn't lack of patience, but more a repeat pattern of weird decisions for the teams they own.

A lot of us where worried because of their previous work at Lausanne and Nice, and this manager situation is a worrying sign that United will be more of the same.
I suppose one positive is they've not given a bumper contract extension to anyone...yet.
 

Lyng

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I didn’t say fantastic work. I said the early signs are positive. I also specifically pointed out how different my job of running a company was. As for evidence of “fantastic work”, which I didn’t say, I put a list of actual examples of things they’d done, without saying they were definitively good. Just that they appeared well thought out. But don’t let my actual words get in the way of your point. Hyperbole strikes again. Proving the entire premise of my post. I’ll also remind you that I said it’s far too early to know the vast majority of what they are doing, nor be in a position to judge it. But I’m not sure what the point is. People hear what they want to hear, without engaging that mushy substance between their ears.
You said evidence of expert work and due diligence. Your actual words. What evidence is that? They have cut down on work force etc. All signs that they know how to run the financial side which is not surprising.
No such evidence for the footballing side yet, I'd argue.

Critical thinking based on actual factual evidence from their previous club work is not engaging with the mushy substance between our ears?
 

Lyng

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I suppose one positive is they've not given a bumper contract extension to anyone...yet.
And I don't think we will see this nonsense under them. Again that is the financial part of the club. I was never in doubt they would have our financial side running much better.
It's the footballing side I worry about.
 

DarkLord1984

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Why is everyone shitting their pants based on a few tweets? The season ended like a week ago, I see no reason to panic already.
And funny how things are seen now as negative, like the appoibtment of Ashworth, as if they can control Newcastles behaviour and we all know there is a legal case ongoing
This.

People are just tweeting bullshit about United because they know it gets them clicks.
 

saivet

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They went from a 'careful and considered' approach to an 'indecisive and nervous' approach. Regardless of what happens, this summer is a bad look for Ineos. Their only saving grace is that Berrada and Ashworth haven't started officially.
 

Insanity

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This....does puzzle me as well. Because, all the names are the exact blokes I think Woody and the gang would be after. There's nothing even remotely obscure, or outside the box. A teenage boy who casually watches football could come up with our managerial targets. It's just not inspiring.

I'd like to think there's a bit more thinking and looking further afield going on behind the scenes, and what we're seeing is mostly just media guff.
Behind all this noise there better be some solid plan or, as you say, this looks eerily similar to the workings of Woody and co. I think it's time for them to show their cards and prepare for a good summer window or we'll be left behind and end up chasing shadows and overpaying for 4th choices later in the window like we have for the last 11 years.
 
Last edited:

wolvored

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At the moment we have no proper leaks what is going on, so the press are reporting anything and everything is going on. All we know for certain is TH has a year left on his contract and it may or may not have that ‘plus a year’ that the players all have.
 

Juicy Juiced

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We cant go with manager who is in final year of his contract. Players would eat him alive and he is meek with charisma of plain piece of cardboard.
At the moment we have no proper leaks what is going on, so the press are reporting anything and everything is going on. All we know for certain is TH has a year left on his contract and it may or may not have that ‘plus a year’ that the players all have.
 

wolvored

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We cant go with manager who is in final year of his contract. Players would eat him alive and he is meek with charisma of plain piece of cardboard.
As I said I’m only stating the facts. They might extend his contract yet. or sack him tomorrow. Who knows?
 

Juicy Juiced

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It seems that nobody knows anything. just hope that they resolve it fast. We need to start planning for next season.
 

ElCuddlos

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That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
Great post. I was honestly ready to give up with this forum before reading that.
 

RedRocket9908

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I hope we hear something today as this ridiculous management saga has been an absolute shambles so far, you have to feel sorry for Erik and his staff who have been left hanging with no idea whether they still have a job or not.
 

Vault Dweller

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Regardless of who they are targeting for a new manager, they way this has been handled so far leaves a lot to be desired. Seriously hoping we hear something this week or it really doesn't inspire much confidence for the coming summer. I think ETH should be sacked, but if they sack him at this point after all the noise and sounding out of other managers when they should have done it weeks ago is pretty poor in my view.
 

Amarsdd

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Jun 7, 2013
Messages
3,378
That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
 

Amarsdd

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Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
3,378
They went from a 'careful and considered' approach to an 'indecisive and nervous' approach. Regardless of what happens, this summer is a bad look for Ineos. Their only saving grace is that Berrada and Ashworth haven't started officially.
'careful and considered' does very much look like 'indecisive and nervous' to an impatient crowd.
 

Tom Van Persie

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Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
25,589
That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
Brilliant post!
 

bringbackbebe

Full Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2021
Messages
1,885
That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
This person talks sense & logic. Burn him!
 

strandty

Full Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2007
Messages
1,662
That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
Everyone needs to read this. Incredible post.
 

Licha-Vidic

Last Man Standing 2 finalist 2023/24
Joined
Jan 9, 2023
Messages
1,404
Running a football club is very different from other business endeavours.

The idea that there is evidence of fantastic work seems far fetched. What evidence?
So far they have made a massive mess out of the manager situation.

And the reason people are worried isn't lack of patience, but more a repeat pattern of weird decisions for the teams they own.

A lot of us where worried because of their previous work at Lausanne and Nice, and this manager situation is a worrying sign that United will be more of the same.
Chill out bro.

How do you judge a crop of employees who have not done anything for that matter, because of time, gardening leave, funds?

Ineos at least is polar opposite of Woodward and Co. If it was Woodward era we would have done some shit things by now regarding the season that has ended.

Ineos took charge on Christmas day. Give them 1 month to actualize themselves with the club. That's February 2024, we can say they had proper insights of the club and how it's run in some ways.

Add, us having the worst period in PL history in between, injuries to boot, being a very broke club, manager who doesn't resolve the midfield issues, probably they have seen United has soo many problems that solving one problem is not going solve anything tangible.

We all have ideas on how to resolve how we play, but nobody here has any ideas of resolving how the club is run because we don't even know how the club is run in the first place.

Ineos are 99% shocked by the situation..

  • If ETH was soo good, they would have backed in immediately.
  • If the club had money, they would have brought reinforcement in January 2024, when injuries had has down completely.
  • If say a Pep manager was jobless they would have sacked ETH immediately.
I believe Ineos does not want to spiral down with mistakes again. They know 1 mistake now they will need 2 more correct decisions to undo the 1 mistake. Better to be slow but sure.

We give them time first to resolve how the club is run.
 

NotChatGPT

Brownfinger
Joined
Jul 3, 2023
Messages
868
That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
This is pretty much the exact reason i don't think we're actively approaching managers for this summer. Considering the people we've approached and hired for key positions, when they are joining, the decision to sack and hire a different manager isn't one we're likely to be in a rush to make. As you say, the changes we need to make are unlikely to have instant effects, so without a no brainer of an available manager (Like Klopp being available when Liverpool sacked Rodgers), we'd easily be better off waiting and seeing how we progress next season. Obviously, if the higher ups have no faith in Ten Hag then a short term option, just for next season or so, wouldn't be out of the question, but trying to approach someone for the long term when the club is still a complete mess is usually not a good idea as it doesn't take more than a bad season for someone to get sacked.
 

MadDogg

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Manchester Utd never lose, just run out of time
Ashworth apparently did some decent work with the national set-up but has only managed in club football for less than a year with Newcastle?

Also, one thing that keeps bothering me is that Ashworth wanted to groom G.Nev for the England managerial role. Which to me suggests he doesn't always have very sound judgement. And from the noises now it seems like he wants to appoint Mr Waist Coat as our manager, which is a scary prospect.
Ashworth was at Brighton for three years as well. Not sure if he was the main man for that entire time, but he was by the end.

As for Neville, I'd say Ashworth likely got in contact with all relatively high profile players who went into management to give them encouragement (such as the likes of Gerrard and Lampard). Basically just touching base so that if any of them ended up succeeding they already had the thought of the England job coming up.
 

Insanity

Most apt username 2015
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Ashworth was at Brighton for three years as well. Not sure if he was the main man for that entire time, but he was by the end.

As for Neville, I'd say Ashworth likely got in contact with all relatively high profile players who went into management to give them encouragement (such as the likes of Gerrard and Lampard). Basically just touching base so that if any of them ended up succeeding they already had the thought of the England job coming up.
From what Gary mentioned on Stick to Football, I gathered it was at the time Gary was an assistant coach for the England team.
 

Vidooq

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From what Gary mentioned on Stick to Football, I gathered it was at the time Gary was an assistant coach for the England team.
It was when Gary took over Valencia. He told him something along the lines of, go and have a few good months, and we will then talk, and you will be in contention to take over from Roy. Dan also told Gary that Valencia was the perfect move for him, so there's that.
 

MadDogg

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Manchester Utd never lose, just run out of time
From what Gary mentioned on Stick to Football, I gathered it was at the time Gary was an assistant coach for the England team.
I actually forgot that he was doing that. But yeah, it sounds like it was when he first took the Valencia job, so they'd have been already working together to some extent at that stage. Not sure if that makes it better or worse :lol:
 

Wednesday at Stoke

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This makes sense if they told zero Erik he is effectively interviewing for his position and he will be competing with other candidates with the (dis)advantage of incumbency. Which puts his comments post the FA cup win into context as well.
 

Grande

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That NYtimes article is more journalistic nonsense. People love some hyperbole, and United fans are such easy targets right now. Huge sections of the fan base are frothing at the mouth, ready to get the pitchforks out, so winding them up with doom mongering and claims of chaos is just too easy. Too many clicks to be had. The press equivalent of a tap in.

Reminds me of about three years ago when there were all these articles saying how bad the academy was and how far behind it had slipped versus all of our rivals, especially City. Previous United players sending their kids to City’s academy because ours was so terrible. No actual content on the quality of coaching, all just smoke and mirrors based around shiny new facilities. Three years later United continue to churn out class players from the academy, and are clearly the top big club in England when it comes to youth development. Especially when you factor in pathways to the first team. If it hadn’t been for factors out of our control, we could have a front three (Rashford, Garnacho and Greenwood) of top players from our academy starting for the first team. And what other big club can say that? None.

People need to massively chill out and let this summer play out. The media is feeding off the fear caused by decades of incompetence and indifference by the Glazers. It’s simply impossible at this early stage to know (a) what the Ineos regime is doing behind the scenes, and (b) how the trajectory of the club will change under their stewardship. This is something to be measured in years, not days or weeks.

I’m very relaxed at this point. They’ve already appointed a lot of top people. They are clearly doing extensive analysis and due diligence on the manager position. And it’s not like we are currently without a manager. We have one that the majority of the fan base apparently want to keep (however misguided that sentiment is), and who is currently on holiday. There’s not a lot of transfer business happening in the lead up to the Euros. Hardly anyone has done anything yet. So this is the perfect time to do all this analysis and due diligence. I am quite sure that targets have already been sounded out, agents spoken to, and the work of offloading players and working on the budgets and organisational structure is ongoing.

Nothing is going to be solved in one summer. The Glazers have made such a mess of this, it’s going to take 2-3 years to get us to a stable, sustainably competitive position - barring miracles from the anointed coach. And that’s exactly how we should be looking at this. Not so much where we are at the end of the season, but more where we are in 3 years. Are we on a solid upward trajectory? Has the squad been adequately retooled with players that fit a consistent playing philosophy, to the point where we don’t need massive turnover every year? Has training and medical infrastructure improved? Are we on a concrete path to a new or redeveloped stadium? Is the club consistently profitable to the point where it can reinvest significantly in the playing squad and future capital improvement projects? Are fan groups being consistently engaged and listened to, and being made a part of a community based approach to local regeneration? Are we continuing to embrace, and improve, our youth development record and pathway to the first team? Have we managed to reignite growth in the commercial department as a key cog of profitability? Etc etc.

The modernisation and reorganisation of the club is a massive project that will take time, patience, and facing a lot of difficult decisions. It’s so much bigger than rushing to placate fans with rapid decisions, or bringing in some marquee players for a short term uptick. It’s about reigniting this club and rebuilding the foundations, which have rotted out beneath our feet. It’s a massive job. So all the nervousness and judgement from certain sections of our fans, and all the gleeful hyperbole and mockery from select sections of the media, are essentially meaningless to those who really understand what needs to be done.

What I have seen so far is a regime that has brought in several of the most coveted football experts in the world. Ashworth, a man universally lauded for his work in the industry, Berrada, one if the most highly rated executives in the football world, Wilcox, another highly rated executive talent, one who turned downed Liverpool to come to us. Blanc, as a temporary CEO, and having a permanent seat on the board, as a man of huge experience and repute in European football. A French David Gill. We’ve poached top medical people from Arsenal. There’s actual movement on the stadium with some heavy football, finance, sport, and political figures involved, with work ongoing to secure public funding or tax breaks. There is a huge sweeping review of operations which is already creating organisationally wide changes.

There is so much evidence to suggest that Ineos is going about things in a deliberate, informed, decisive and expert way, and yet people are derailed so easily by a two week wait to know the fate of the manager. I suspect the bed wetters right now are the same people who will laud a young player for being a massive talent one week, only to call him absolute shit a few weeks or months later. And I don’t suppose there is much one can do about people who think like that. Must be stressful. For them. For the rest of us, those who don’t like to live in a constant vortex of drama, gossip, hyperbole, extremes, conspiracy and vitriol, the early signs are positive and we need to let it play out over an extended period of time before coming to any serious judgement.

For context, in 2017 I was appointed CEO of a small to medium sized business with 150 employees. The previous CEO had virtually bankrupted the company, the public image was shot, debts had piled up, and the organisational culture was toxic. It took me two years to turn that company around, to the point where it was profitable again, debts were cleared, we had a positive public image, and it was a desirable place to work again. Two years, and this was a small, tiny company by comparison, with not even 5% of the complexity of a massive club like United. That first year especially, I was haunted by the litany of terrible decisions made my by predecesor, and had to own many of them as the consequences of his decisions often weren’t felt for several months after he had been relieved of command. That was at least 18 months of abuse from people, people angry about what came before and that change wasn’t happening fast enough, and then other people angry about any change happening at all. “What do you mean I have to come to work on time???” These were the same people who two years later were lapping up the success and pretending to have been a key supporter and influencer in the change initiative all along.

People are predictable, and largely quite stupid. People want change immediately, but they also complain about most of the changes. One thing they definitely don’t want you to do is think about your changes, and take time to plan them out and do them properly. That’s just indecisive and dithering, until it isn’t and all the thoughtful hard work starts to pay off, and then they were a crucial part of it all along.
Instead of writing a long new post, I’ll rather repeat this. If anyone read the first couple of paragraphs earlier, you can read a few more of them now ;)

Of course, we should be tolerant with our fellow fans’ anxiousness as well - it’s not easy sitting on the sidelines and just ‘trust the processes’ inside the dressing room and board room, when we have almost no clue wether it’s simonhch in there concocting a fantastic new change we can believe in, or a maniacal narcissistic Victor Glazer Frankenstein regen plotting the end of the world as we love it.
 

RedRover

Full Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2007
Messages
8,999
Running a football club is very different from other business endeavours.

The idea that there is evidence of fantastic work seems far fetched. What evidence?
So far they have made a massive mess out of the manager situation.

And the reason people are worried isn't lack of patience, but more a repeat pattern of weird decisions for the teams they own.

A lot of us where worried because of their previous work at Lausanne and Nice, and this manager situation is a worrying sign that United will be more of the same.
What exactly have they done wrong?

Seems to me that (as usual) journalists and twitter accounts are just guessing at what's going. There's been no comment from the club, not any evidence of any leaks.

The season ended two weeks ago.
 

Drz

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Messages
1,354
If it weren't for the fans and media speculation, I would just think INEOS are succession planning for when ETH's time is up.
 

Insanity

Most apt username 2015
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It was when Gary took over Valencia. He told him something along the lines of, go and have a few good months, and we will then talk, and you will be in contention to take over from Roy. Dan also told Gary that Valencia was the perfect move for him, so there's that.
I actually forgot that he was doing that. But yeah, it sounds like it was when he first took the Valencia job, so they'd have been already working together to some extent at that stage. Not sure if that makes it better or worse :lol:
Yeah, it's a real doozy.

However, it's just one incident and as one of you mentioned he did have a stint at Brighton too. He was a technical director their for 3 seasons and then Dof at Newcastle for 2 seasons. Before that he was a Director of Elite development for England. He does seem to have a lot of experience.
 

Lyng

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5,463
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Denmark
What exactly have they done wrong?

Seems to me that (as usual) journalists and twitter accounts are just guessing at what's going. There's been no comment from the club, not any evidence of any leaks.

The season ended two weeks ago.
Very reputable journalists and sites like the Athletic are reporting talks with several managers, while we still have Ten Hag. It undermines the current manager completely and the managers are so different in style that it paints a picture of a very scattergun approach.
If this was the sun or some random twitter accounts I would pay no mind to the noise.
 

RedRover

Full Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2007
Messages
8,999
Very reputable journalists and sites like the Athletic are reporting talks with several managers, while we still have Ten Hag. It undermines the current manager completely and the managers are so different in style that it paints a picture of a very scattergun approach.
If this was the sun or some random twitter accounts I would pay no mind to the noise.
Given the teams performance, clearly Ten Hag's position was potentially going to be at risk. Whether they stick with him or move on, it's sensible for them to sound out other options. To not do so would be madness. They may well have been perfectly clear with him about his position and their intentions.

A decision needs to be taken but two weeks since the end of the season isn't an unreasonable time frame - especially since the unavailability of the chosen senior executives is going to create difficulty. The press are speculating. The club have, so far, remained silent.

It might paint a picture of a scattergun approach when you know nothing about what's going on behind the scenes. Nobody really knows what's happening.
 

Lyng

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Given the teams performance, clearly Ten Hag's position was potentially going to be at risk. Whether they stick with him or move on, it's sensible for them to sound out other options. To not do so would be madness. They may well have been perfectly clear with him about his position and their intentions.

A decision needs to be taken but two weeks since the end of the season isn't an unreasonable time frame - especially since the unavailability of the chosen senior executives is going to create difficulty. The press are speculating. The club have, so far, remained silent.

It might paint a picture of a scattergun approach when you know nothing about what's going on behind the scenes. Nobody really knows what's happening.
Well The Athletic have so far been fairly spot on about what's going on. So unless you blindly believe Ineos can do no wrong and thus refute all reports that might suggest otherwise, we do know, at least some, of what's going on. Ie approaching very different styles of managers.
I am sure you understand why that undermines Ten Hags position.
 

GoldanoGraham

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All the journos are just speculating as they don’t have the old moles in the camp leaking everything these days.

Just a different spin on things, but SJR has always networked with lots of different people from different positions/clubs and sports over the years.

He also lives in Monaco - therefore post F1 race when everyone who is anyone in sport were in town that SJR decided to meet up with some football people (he knows Tuchel from meeting him at Chelsea) does not mean he was touting the current position to him? Could have possibly been talking about some Bayern players that we are interested in or seeing what TT has planned down the line?

However the narrative is that Tuchel rejected an approach based on the sporting project? That is just pure speculation.

I would be fairly certain that ETH knows what’s happening and that they have plenty of dialogue with him. Ineos do not appear to respond to any media speculation which does help fuel it but to think that they are going around offering the job to various managers is very unrealistic especially when you have someone in the position already.

If ETH is going then he already knew/knows it. An agreement on severance would keep that quiet.

I do however think that a statement either way regarding the manager is imperative otherwise the media frenzy just continues to speculate and for Ineos to appear indecisive.