8 minutes and 46 seconds kneel

RUCK4444

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I'll get other people to do things so I can feel good about doing nothing myself.
If I had the stage footballers have I know that I would take that opportunity. It has a far bigger impact than you or I off the street.

But I agree with the sentiment that it takes more than just people in the limelight. It's an educational issue.

However the more it is shamed and highlighted the more the younger generations who are learning from what they see will understand how wrong it is.

If we continue to turn a blind eye then so to will our children. What I hope will come from this is a larger more robust approach from everybody (the ones that care) to speak out and not turn a blind eye anymore, don't ignore that 'harmless' racist joke at work, try to educate people with a naive stereotypical view of minorities. These things happen every minute of the day in every walk of life, what it does is dumb down people into accepting it.

There will always be racists but in 2020 it should be less prevalent, we shouldn't be seeing a group of white police officers allowing the slow death of a man whilst knowing they are being recorded - It's clear they felt totally in the right to commit this disgraceful act. I mean how can that be in 2020 in the streets of a modern society that professes to lead the way in the free world and set the example?

It's all of our responsibility to try to affect any meaningful change. To not accept it. It's made all the more important now because of the racist clown they have in power over there. Somebody of his inclination can set that country back 30 years in relation to the fragile progress they have made with integration.
 

TheReligion

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And I am sick of everyone jumping the gun and encouraging what's happening blatantly cherrypicking certain details to fit their agenda. George Floyd is being painted as some sort of Saint right now but the reality is that he was far from it. How about the cop who was shot by protesters? Nobody is talking about it because they are too busy "protesting". Footballers just like many other athletes and professionals do a lot of anti-racism campaigns and they should stick to doing that but they should not be involved in individual accidents like this.
Urgh this post..

1) George Floyd had a criminal past but that doesn't mean he deserved to be killed in the street whilst going to to buy some groceries. His past and character is irrelevant.

2) Two wrongs don't make a right. The US, and world, need to come together on this not inflame matters and widen the divide.

3) Whilst I agree footballers do alot of great work regarding racism it still exists within the game.

I'm fully behind a gesture by players to show their solidarity behind promoting equality as this is a prime opportunity to bring about awareness and change to the masses.
 

adexkola

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I expect players on this side of the pond to have some sort of protest, and I can envision where they would kneel for 8 minutes and 46 seconds.

I don't expect the same from football players in Europe/elsewhere, however if it is done, this guy would be appreciative of their efforts to bring more light to the issue of police brutality and racism in the US.
 

Pagh Wraith

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He's right in a sense.

There's nothing wrong with players kneeling in support. But it could set a dangerous precedent. Where do you draw the line? Why is kneeling for 8.46 considered worthy, yet we turn a blind eye on the Khashoggi murder and the atrocities that Saudi royal family support (including racism in the middle east) and there are no on field protests against Bin Salman's proposed takeover of Newcastle?

Players are not politically nuanced enough to navigate this without guidance. If players "protesting" becomes the norm, "non-protest" can be regarded as acceptance/compliance . I'd much rather Kick It Out, EPL and the FA use this opportunity, whilst there's media attention on race relations, to remind people that racism isn't tolerated, detail subtle examples of racism in football and how it is going to be tackled in the sport.

Saying that, if players wish to kneel during a celebration etc that's their personal choice. But I don't think it should be an organised event which forces everyone into pausing the game, how about if a player doesn't wish to kneel for 8.46, they want to continue play and score a goal? The back lash would be unjust.
Think this is a very good post.
 

adexkola

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He's right in a sense.

There's nothing wrong with players kneeling in support. But it could set a dangerous precedent. Where do you draw the line? Why is kneeling for 8.46 considered worthy, yet we turn a blind eye on the Khashoggi murder and the atrocities that Saudi royal family support (including racism in the middle east) and there are no on field protests against Bin Salman's proposed takeover of Newcastle?

Players are not politically nuanced enough to navigate this without guidance. If players "protesting" becomes the norm, "non-protest" can be regarded as acceptance/compliance . I'd much rather Kick It Out, EPL and the FA use this opportunity, whilst there's media attention on race relations, to remind people that racism isn't tolerated, detail subtle examples of racism in football and how it is going to be tackled in the sport.

Saying that, if players wish to kneel during a celebration etc that's their personal choice. But I don't think it should be an organised event which forces everyone into pausing the game, how about if a player doesn't wish to kneel for 8.46, they want to continue play and score a goal? The back lash would be unjust.
Dangerous precedent :lol: get a fecking grip

I am in support of any player who decides he wants to raise awareness on whatever issue is on his mind. Just because awareness is raised on one issue, doesn't invalidate other issues out there. We all have issues and causes that hit close to home.

The kneeling shouldn't be organized, but all that feel the need to show support and raise awareness should be given the chance and support by their club and FAs. 8 minutes and 46 seconds on the field of play may be excessive given the sport... But if the players can work something out I'm all for it.
 

Lynty

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Dangerous precedent :lol: get a fecking grip

I am in support of any player who decides he wants to raise awareness on whatever issue is on his mind. Just because awareness is raised on one issue, doesn't invalidate other issues out there. We all have issues and causes that hit close to home.

The kneeling shouldn't be organized, but all that feel the need to show support and raise awareness should be given the chance and support by their club and FAs. 8 minutes and 46 seconds on the field of play may be excessive given the sport... But if the players can work something out I'm all for it.
Sancho did it during celebration. Nothing stops a full team doing it after a goal whilst they have the full attention of media, and it shouldn't be discouraged.

It is a dangerous precedent to allow or encourage the organizing of demonstrations during play. How can you not see that? Once you become a voice and you fail to use it, you become compliant with the injustices. It's a minefield for a 20 year old athlete. Racism is a cultural problem, but when you condemn White on Black discrimination in the US then stay silent on discrimination to shia, homosexuals and women in Saudi Arabia, it becomes political - because there are political reasons behind your silence (financial gain, job prospects, influence of peers). That's just one example.

Then we move onto the issue of peer pressure. Look at the kneeling Liverpool squad picture. Can we take that seriously? Do all of them really, deeply hold such support? More likely, Hendo got everyone together and said, 'we should kneel in support, come on lets take a photo' and some players felt they couldn't decline (like the Suarez t-shirts show of support). It cheapens the protest.

Such actions should be personal moments, after considering the issue and understanding that sometimes - protest comes with sacrifice...Colin Kaepernick
 

Zlatattack

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All players should do it for a minute before kicking off i reckon.
 

adexkola

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Sancho did it during celebration. Nothing stops a full team doing it after a goal whilst they have the full attention of media, and it shouldn't be discouraged.

It is a dangerous precedent to allow or encourage the organizing of demonstrations during play. How can you not see that? Once you become a voice and you fail to use it, you become compliant with the injustices. It's a minefield for a 20 year old athlete. Racism is a cultural problem, but when you condemn White on Black discrimination in the US then stay silent on discrimination to shia, homosexuals and women in Saudi Arabia, it becomes political - because there are political reasons behind your silence (financial gain, job prospects, influence of peers). That's just one example.

Then we move onto the issue of peer pressure. Look at the kneeling Liverpool squad picture. Can we take that seriously? Do all of them really, deeply hold such support? More likely, Hendo got everyone together and said, 'we should kneel in support, come on lets take a photo' and some players felt they couldn't decline (like the Suarez t-shirts show of support). It cheapens the protest.

Such actions should be personal moments, after considering the issue and understanding that sometimes - protest comes with sacrifice...Colin Kaepernick
:houllier:

No you don't... That's an ignorant statement, similar to the idiots who condemned Sterling because he didn't hop on every issue after he spoke out against racism that one time. I don't speak out on every issue that happens in the world... That's unrealistic.

I think it goes without saying that no one should feel pressured into protesting. And just because someone doesn't want to protest, doesn't mean they are a bad person or are complicit in what's going on. That's the difference in our viewpoints: I value and appreciate any player who decides to speak on any issue close to their heart... You don't value it unless they take on other issues as well (because if they don't, they may as well keep shut and stop playing favorite)...
 

Lynty

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That's the difference in our viewpoints: I value and appreciate any player who decides to speak on any issue close to their heart... You don't value it unless they take on other issues as well (because if they don't, they may as well keep shut and stop playing favorite)..
You've got me wrong there.

It's important to speak on issues close to your heart. And I wouldn't expect people to comment on things they don't have knowledge on, but this:


...is hypocrisy.
 

adexkola

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You've got me wrong there.

It's important to speak on issues close to your heart. And I wouldn't expect people to comment on things they don't have knowledge on, but this:


...is hypocrisy.
Ah ok fair enough.

Yes I don't value coerced protests, but the less cynical side of me would like to think this is a cause everyone would get behind. "Yeah bloody awful, just kneel right?"
 

RobinLFC

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More likely, Hendo got everyone together and said, 'we should kneel in support, come on lets take a photo' and some players felt they couldn't decline (like the Suarez t-shirts show of support). It cheapens the protest.
Nope.

 

RobinLFC

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:lol::lol::lol::lol: for god sake, I mention Liverpool and this guy always appears.
You assumed things and were wrong, and are pretty much wrong about the whole subject in this thread as far as I'm concerned. No amount of green smileys will change that.
 

horsechoker

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:lol::lol::lol::lol: for god sake, I mention Liverpool and this guy always appears.
You assumed things and were wrong, and are pretty much wrong about the whole subject in this thread as far as I'm concerned. I will not look for you, I will not pursue you. But if you don't stop attacking Liverpool, I will look for you, I will find you, and I will kill you.
 

pratyush_utd

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Ironic. It’s not for one black person, THATS THE POINT.

For people to take a stand, and not just black people, it obviously needs to come after a major event.

It’s to affect to bigger picture of racism, not this single incident in isolation.

I thought that much would be feckin obvious really, but apparently not on the caf.

Feckin embarrassing in here at times, think I’m gunna give this place a wide berth for a while tbh.
I don't know what you are trying to say here. What is so embarassing about pointing out that this event is not at all comparable to what millions in Africa face daily? Or what Blacks in Libya are facing? Does Black lives only matter in countries like US?

Nobody here is defending racism. Nobody is defending what happened. I am merely pointing out the hypocrisy by major companies who have suddenly found their conscience when one of the biggest consumer had any issue. Where were these companies when Yazidis genocide was happening? Where were these companies when Yemen hospitals where bombed by Saudis? What has been done by all major companies for stopping Libya slave trade? I can mention million events like that. This is purely US issue and not a worldwide issue. Police brutality exist in every country ( trust me I know being an Indian). Actually nobody would have cared if it wasn't election season. Atleast I am guilty of ignoring all of them and can't be accused of selective outrage.
 

TwoSheds

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The US are self appointed arbiters of morality all across the globe. Their collossal abdication of morality and ethics in their institutions affects every other nation on earth whether you asked for it or not. If their people are finally rising up against it (Americans are by and large good people), they need support of other good people all across the globe.

Moral transgressions of the "World Police" are much more important and impactful than transgressions of the policed whether we like it or not. Sorting out American society and politics would actually benefit everybody.
 

RUCK4444

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I don't know what you are trying to say here. What is so embarassing about pointing out that this event is not at all comparable to what millions in Africa face daily? Or what Blacks in Libya are facing? Does Black lives only matter in countries like US?

Nobody here is defending racism. Nobody is defending what happened. I am merely pointing out the hypocrisy by major companies who have suddenly found their conscience when one of the biggest consumer had any issue. Where were these companies when Yazidis genocide was happening? Where were these companies when Yemen hospitals where bombed by Saudis? What has been done by all major companies for stopping Libya slave trade? I can mention million events like that. This is purely US issue and not a worldwide issue. Police brutality exist in every country ( trust me I know being an Indian). Actually nobody would have cared if it wasn't election season. Atleast I am guilty of ignoring all of them and can't be accused of selective outrage.
What companies are you talking about?

As I’ve pointed out It doesn’t matter what country, like I said this is a result of a high profile incident on the streets of a western, first world country. The reaction is An accumulative reaction to what has been going on in the states and the world over.

People are fixating on it only being because it happened in the states - it isn’t.

That said, the fact it is going on in the streets in the USA with the police acting with sheer impunity just highlights how bad the situation is.

Are we to be expected to forever ignore racism now because worse things happen in Yemen or Africa? What a backward opinion that would be.

“Evil prevails when good men do nothing.”
 

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The US are self appointed arbiters of morality all across the globe. Their collossal abdication of morality and ethics in their institutions affects every other nation on earth whether you asked for it or not. If their people are finally rising up against it (Americans are by and large good people), they need support of other good people all across the globe.

Moral transgressions of the "World Police" are much more important and impactful than transgressions of the policed whether we like it or not. Sorting out American society and politics would actually benefit everybody.
You believe this?

Up until 1967 it was still illegal for black and white people to marry in the USA and wasn't the case in most other countries. The USA were still internally trading slaves in the 1860s, well after other countries had abolished. I do not believe for one second that other countries follow US morals as they have been abdicated for the longest. They are often criticised for their history of racism by other nations so why would anyone follow their lead?
they also recently had legal segregation, jim crow laws etc.

Countries are aware of the USA's role in many global conflicts, occupations, roles in terrorism. But do they care? Even today allies of the USA still commit feckeries that would not fly in the USA but again they don't care as they are not following the USA's lead.
 

Stacks

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What companies are you talking about?

As I’ve pointed out It doesn’t matter what country, like I said this is a result of a high profile incident on the streets of a western, first world country. The reaction is An accumulative reaction to what has been going on in the states and the world over.

People are fixating on it only being because it happened in the states - it isn’t.

That said, the fact it is going on in the streets in the USA with the police acting with sheer impunity just highlights how bad the situation is.

Are we to be expected to forever ignore racism now because worse things happen in Yemen or Africa? What a backward opinion that would be.

“Evil prevails when god men do nothing.”
Good men will continue to do nothing. I think the bolded bit hits the nail on the head. I guarantee nothing will be done on a global scale. People tend to have lower expectations of non western countries and the "soft bigotry of low expectations" exists WITHIN western countries.

I do agree with the second bold bit. If anyone here works for the government or law enforcement please do not be offended, but near enough all great human atrocities have been committed by government agents such as military or police, if you really think about it.
 

RUCK4444

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Good men will continue to do nothing. I think the bolded bit hits the nail on the head. I guarantee nothing will be done on a global scale. People tend to have lower expectations of non western countries and the "soft bigotry of low expectations" exists WITHIN western countries.

I do agree with the second bold bit. If anyone here works for the government or law enforcement please do not be offended, but near enough all great human atrocities have been committed by government agents such as military or police, if you really think about it.
All I’m pointing out is that if it can happen on the streets of a western country like the state’s then of course it will be far worse in third world countries.

The major difference being we are not able to effect what goes on in third world countries, far less than we can in America and Europe.

The fact that worse happens elsewhere doesn’t mean we shouldn’t use this as a line in the sand. That opinion makes no sense and no oppression would ever be overturned with that attitude.

Racial prejudice has taken decades and decades to reduce to where it is now (still nowhere near good enough) and what Trump is allowing to unfold is undoing a lot of that painstaking progress.

I think to explain myself further just beggers belief really and anybody that opposes the suggestion in the OP clearly think it’s not important enough a topic to encroach on their entertainment for 8 minutes. Says it all really.
 

edcunited1878

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You believe this?

Up until 1967 it was still illegal for black and white people to marry in the USA and wasn't the case in most other countries. The USA were still internally trading slaves in the 1860s, well after other countries had abolished. I do not believe for one second that other countries follow US morals as they have been abdicated for the longest. They are often criticised for their history of racism by other nations so why would anyone follow their lead?
they also recently had legal segregation, jim crow laws etc.

Countries are aware of the USA's role in many global conflicts, occupations, roles in terrorism. But do they care? Even today allies of the USA still commit feckeries that would not fly in the USA but again they don't care as they are not following the USA's lead.
Regardless of race, no matter the geographic location or religious beliefs, millions of people around the world are suppressed. Someone else is always going to try to one up many other people for their advantage and do what they can do keep that advantage. To your point, not many countries care because they are so far removed from the United States and it's large diversity (for the most part). Every country has their own cultural and societal issues to confront with on a daily basis that already has some impact on them.
 

TwoSheds

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You believe this?

Up until 1967 it was still illegal for black and white people to marry in the USA and wasn't the case in most other countries. The USA were still internally trading slaves in the 1860s, well after other countries had abolished. I do not believe for one second that other countries follow US morals as they have been abdicated for the longest. They are often criticised for their history of racism by other nations so why would anyone follow their lead?
they also recently had legal segregation, jim crow laws etc.

Countries are aware of the USA's role in many global conflicts, occupations, roles in terrorism. But do they care? Even today allies of the USA still commit feckeries that would not fly in the USA but again they don't care as they are not following the USA's lead.
Self appointed arbiters of morality don't have to be moral. They just have to have a desire to infect other countries with their poisonous views of the world. And if you don't believe that then you are crackers.
 

Wibble

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What happened to that fella was a shame & disgrace. But terrible things happen every day all over the world.

Imo sport should stick with sport & not make political statements regardless of how well intended they are. I go to football to forget about life for a few hours.

Individuals within sport can lend their support outside of the game & any right minded person would support them in doing that.

Just my 2 cents
The same could have been said about sport in the apartheit era but that would have put you firmly on the wrong side of history.
 

jymufc20

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I'm not sure if I've missed something in all this but I find it pretty disrespectful to the guy that died to be honest, if I died like that I wouldn't want everyone kneeling down at my funeral copying the actual murder.
 

Sigma

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I'm not sure if I've missed something in all this but I find it pretty disrespectful to the guy that died to be honest, if I died like that I wouldn't want everyone kneeling down at my funeral copying the actual murder.
The kneeling protest was popularised by Colin Kapernick in 2016 as a method to raise awareness of police brutality (during the national anthem of American football NFL games). It's only a coincidence that this stance also killed George Floyd. The protest they are talking about in this thread is in relation to what Colin Kapernick has done.
 

jymufc20

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The kneeling protest was popularised by Colin Kapernick in 2016 as a method to raise awareness of police brutality (during the national anthem of American football NFL games). It's only a coincidence that this stance also killed George Floyd. The protest they are talking about in this thread is in relation to what Colin Kapernick has done.
Thanks, I remember that now. I thought this was a new thing for George Floyd.
 

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Kap looking pretty vindicated now huh? All the right wing news stations like Fox were ripping him apart. Trump was ripping him apart. They should all apologise but they won't. Kap needs to speak
 

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Kap looking pretty vindicated now huh? All the right wing news stations like Fox were ripping him apart. Trump was ripping him apart. They should all apologise but they won't. Kap needs to speak
He wouldn't even need to say anything. He could wear a t-shirt saying "I was right", and that would be enough of a powerful message.

This is going to end up very bad I fear. It's an election year over there with a backdrop of civil unrest, economic collapse and a pandemic, and a president who is not afraid to weaponize all those things if it benefits him.
 

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I think that nobody should be forced to support anything if he doesn't have desire to do so. If some player wants to kneel it is a good thing and it will send a powerful message, if some player wants to send some other strong public message it is also great but this "lets do it as a group" support i never liked.

Supporting something should be a personal choice.
 

RedRover

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Is protest (on anything) a moral obligation now?

If players wish to protest, then they can, on the pitch or via the press and social media. Making it in any way mandatory or organised takes away the impact and, in my view puts footballers in a very uncomfortable position. Some will be well able to articulate their feelings and feel comfortable in using their fame to do so, others less so. They should have the freedom to choose, as you or I do.

Also, inviting politics into football sets a dangerous precedent. I would hope that you would struggle to find any right minded human being who does not consider what happened to this poor man to be anything other that utterly vile, or recognise the inherent racism around the world but what about more complex issues? What if a player wants to protest on other issues (Palestine, immediately springs to mind), will that be acceptable. What about the guy at Stoke (who's name I can't remember off hand) who refuses to wear a poppy but keeps making inflammatory statements on Twitter? Who decides what's acceptable and what isn't? That's dangerous territory in my opinion.
 

Deery

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Is protest (on anything) a moral obligation now?

If players wish to protest, then they can, on the pitch or via the press and social media. Making it in any way mandatory or organised takes away the impact and, in my view puts footballers in a very uncomfortable position. Some will be well able to articulate their feelings and feel comfortable in using their fame to do so, others less so. They should have the freedom to choose, as you or I do.

Also, inviting politics into football sets a dangerous precedent. I would hope that you would struggle to find any right minded human being who does not consider what happened to this poor man to be anything other that utterly vile, or recognise the inherent racism around the world but what about more complex issues? What if a player wants to protest on other issues (Palestine, immediately springs to mind), will that be acceptable. What about the guy at Stoke (who's name I can't remember off hand) who refuses to wear a poppy but keeps making inflammatory statements on Twitter? Who decides what's acceptable and what isn't? That's dangerous territory in my opinion.
James Mc Clean is the Stoke player, and I for one couldn’t care less if a player wants to make a protest for something they believe in, like Shaqiri doing the eagle symbol at the World Cup or Matic not wearing a poppy don’t see anything wrong with it..
 

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What happened to that fella was a shame & disgrace. But terrible things happen every day all over the world.

Imo sport should stick with sport & not make political statements regardless of how well intended they are. I go to football to forget about life for a few hours.

Individuals within sport can lend their support outside of the game & any right minded person would support them in doing that.

Just my 2 cents
Footballers, just like all the other professionals should stick to their jobs instead of doing stupid things like this.
A lot of people who spend an inordinate amount of time in the online world are intensely Americanised, truly believe they live in America and that American issues are global issues. They aren't
Where was the Premier League when thousands upon thousands of innocents were dying from American drone strikes? Where was the PL on the crack down in Hong Kong? Where was it on a hundred other injustices that don't seem to matter because they don't occur in the western world? This will get a lot of likes on twitter though so it will probably go through in some form
Not sure footballers in England protesting stuff in the US makes sense - especially when there's plenty of racism in the UK to tackle first.
I at no point said this was a US-related issue, nor do I believe that. However, kneeling is what Colin Kaepernick did, and 8 minutes and 46 seconds is the amount of time that poor man took to die. So clearly this is all a very US-based way of approaching something based on US events, and in this case specifically a US event which has just happened.
So footballers are now going to kneel for every tragedy? Will be a long time before we start playing.

It's funny how everyone is so concerned about one black person in America while millions in Africa are suffering daily and nobody cares. Modern day slavery is well and alive in Libya and it hardly get any news time or protest marches.
Keep politics out of football. Its all fun and games until we shame footballers into doing it or when certain footballers want to express support to a cause that the public doesn't agree with.
McClean has entered the chat
It has nothing to fecking do with politics. It's about humanity and civil rights. A man had his life snuffed out for 9 minutes in a crowd of people on social media, and most likely the only reason his killers will be held accountable is b/c a teenage girl happened to record what happened.

Yet the people above want to hide behind anonymity and whataboutisms in order dehumanize this man just so they can feel comfortable watching a football match.

Let me know when you decide to grow up from being a selfish prick into an empathetic human being.
 

MackRobinson

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A minute's silence in recognition of the tragedy would suffice.

We can send the message that we are aware of the problem without causing unnecessary disruption to the game.
Yet you are in another thread clamoring that PL shouldn't start. Can't even make this stuff up.
 

amolbhatia50k

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It has nothing to fecking do with politics. It's about humanity and civil rights. A man had his life snuffed out for 9 minutes in a crowd of people on social media, and most likely the only reason his killers will be held accountable is b/c a teenage girl happened to record what happened.

Yet the people above want to hide behind anonymity and whataboutisms in order dehumanize this man just so they can feel comfortable watching a football match.

Let me know when you decide to grow up from being a selfish prick into an empathetic human being.
Let us know when you stop reacting like an emotional child.
 

fps

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Apparently it’s hypocrisy because we haven’t done it already.

So we must turn a blind eye forever now, for fear of being hypocrites, that’s more important than taking a stand against it (finally)
We are all very welcome to take a stand against racism any time. That doesn't mean it has to permeate everything. Anti-racism campaigns do actually already permeate football.
Well said.

This is about drawing a line in the sand.
This is about saying "No more!"

It may have grown from one of many incidents, in another country. It may just be in so many people's consciousness because we are exposed to American news. It may seem one incident is being given more gravitas than many more heinous crimes in many other countries.

But this is the focal point of a necessary outpouring. A time stamp for a world of oppressed people, and for those of us are unwilling to stand by and be complicit.
This has put the issue to the front of the news, and demands of us to say where we stand.

It is not about the minutiae of what happened to George Floyd. It is about how we wish to react to a world that has allowed it and similar scenarios, and whether we are willing to allow its continued acceptance.

This is a Tiananmen square moment.
This is where we say, "Enough is enough!"
Tiananmen Square? I think a lot of people will struggle to remember the poor man's name in a year. I think of Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing. That was a mark in the sand too. And it's 30 years ago. The vast majority of people said "No more" longly and loudly a long time ago. And yet more continues to happen. This thre
It has nothing to fecking do with politics. It's about humanity and civil rights. A man had his life snuffed out for 9 minutes in a crowd of people on social media, and most likely the only reason his killers will be held accountable is b/c a teenage girl happened to record what happened.

Yet the people above want to hide behind anonymity and whataboutisms in order dehumanize this man just so they can feel comfortable watching a football match.

Let me know when you decide to grow up from being a selfish prick into an empathetic human being.
There are many things which you can do which do not involve a football match to make a difference to this. I do not wish British sporting events to sway with commemorations for each major tragic event which hits the media. It is ignorant of the nature of the world, and the terrible things which happen in it, everywhere, all the time. In a year's time, most people will not remember this man's name, as they have forgotten Oscar Grant's name and many others'. That is life. I very clearly stated that the anti-racism message should be a constant, and not tied to specific events, and also that my concern was that many would think racism was something which took people's lives in other countries and ignore the millions of smaller issues of racism which tie into systemic racism right here in Britain. Your response to all this is a real lashing out that probably comes from a feeling of powerlessness in the face of awful tragedy. Well, that is the world, I'm afraid.
 

MackRobinson

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There are many things which you can do which do not involve a football match to make a difference to this. I do not wish British sporting events to sway with commemorations for each major tragic event which hits the media. It is ignorant of the nature of the world, and the terrible things which happen in it, everywhere, all the time. In a year's time, most people will not remember this man's name, as they have forgotten Oscar Grant's name and many others'. That is life. I very clearly stated that the anti-racism message should be a constant, and not tied to specific events, and also that my concern was that many would think racism was something which took people's lives in other countries and ignore the millions of smaller issues of racism which tie into systemic racism right here in Britain. Your response to all this is a real lashing out that probably comes from a feeling of powerlessness in the face of awful tragedy. Well, that is the world, I'm afraid.
Like I said, you just want to feel comfortable watching a football. If you don't care about racism that fine but not everyone is a nihilist. Some people actually give a shit. Some people actually realize there are things bigger than the sanctity of sporting events. Racism and discrimination aren't just a US problem (which is pretty fecking obvious if you watch football) and football isn't so sacred that it should shun solidarity or awareness in order to allow people like fps to feel comfortable in his safe space watching entertainment.

Actually, I feel pretty damn powerful. I volunteer in my community, donate to causes I care about, and am part of network of people with the resources, time, and motivation to counteract nihilists like yourself. Don't project your weakness on those of us actually doing attempting to change an amoral system that has claimed many lives. Cheers.